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Yosemite Sam named new ambassador to Muslimland

deevah

TRIBE Member
All over a Caricature

Source

Fury rippled throughout the Muslim world Friday after cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, originally appearing in a Danish newspaper in September, were reprinted across Europe in a show of press freedom.

In Indonesia, more than 150 hardline Muslims stormed into a highrise building housing the Danish Embassy to protest the caricatures, then tore down and burned the country's white and red flag. The rowdy protest was one of the first in Indonesia, the world's most populous Muslim country, against the 12 cartoons.

The cartoons included an image of Muhammad wearing a turban shaped as a bomb with a burning fuse.

Islamic tradition bars any depiction of the prophet, favourable or otherwise, to prevent idolatry. The drawings have prompted boycotts of Danish goods, bomb threats and demonstrations against Danish facilities in Muslim countries.

"We are not terrorists, we are not anarchists, but we are against those people who blaspheme Islam," one of the Indonesian protesters shouted outside the building, which also houses several other foreign missions.

The demonstrators, who wore white Arabic-style robes, pelted the building with eggs before pushing their way past security guards into the building's plush lobby.

Shouting "God is Great," they tried to push into elevators to reach the mission on the building's 25th floor, but were told to stop by protest leaders. Some furniture was damaged in the melee, an Associated Press photographer said.

Meanwhile in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Muslims chanted "Destroy our enemies" at a rally Friday outside the Danish Embassy.

About 60 members of the opposition Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party, or PAS, accused the Danish newspaper Jyllands Posten of intentionally seeking to incite hatred and violence against Muslims.

"It's an uncivilized act, it's heinous," PAS youth chief Hanifah Maidin said after submitting a letter to the Danish Embassy.

"We want the Denmark government to tender an apology to the Muslim world and . . . take serious measures to prevent Jyllands Posten from repeating the same mistake," he said.

Pakistan's parliament passed unanimously a resolution Friday condemning the cartoons, and a coalition of hardline Islamic parties planned to hold street protests in major cities.

The resolution said that the cartoons have "hurt the faith and feelings of Muslims all over the world."

The measure added: "This vicious, outrageous and provocative campaign cannot be justified in the name of freedom of expression or of the press. Freedom also requires responsibility."

Iraq's top Shiite cleric also weighed in on the controversy, condemning the publication of the cartoons, but suggesting Muslims were partly to blame for distorting the image of Islam.

"We strongly denounce and condemn this horrific action," Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani said.

Al-Sistani's remarks, posted on his website and dated Jan. 31, refrained from any calls for protests against the cartoons. Al-Sistani referred to "misguided and oppressive" segments of the Muslim community and said their actions "projected a distorted and dark image of the faith of justice, love and brotherhood."

France's foreign minister said Friday he was shocked that Islamic hardliners have burned flags to protest caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad printed in European newspapers.

Philippe Douste-Blazy also criticized the drawings, saying "it isn't normal to caricature a whole religion as an extremist or even terrorist movement."

However, the minister told LCI television: "I'm shocked and I find it unacceptable that, because there were caricatures in the West, extremists can burn flags or adopt fundamentalist or extremist positions that would suggest the caricaturists were right."

Right-wing Italian newspapers on Friday published the 12 caricatures and printed editorials criticizing European media for giving in to pressure over the drawings.

The drawings appeared on the front pages of the Libero daily under the headline "Muhammad rules here."
 

Hi i'm God

TRIBE Member
Tens of thousands of Palestinians demonstrate against Prophet cartoons

http://news.yahoo.com/s/cpress/20060203/ca_pr_on_wo/prophet_drawings


GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) - Tens of thousands of angry Muslims marched through Palestinian cities, burned the Danish flag and called for vengeance Friday against European countries where caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad were published.


The demonstrations were the latest sign of growing anger against the cartoons that has spread across the Muslim world.

Early Friday, Palestinian militants threw a bomb at a French cultural centre in Gaza City and many Palestinians began boycotting European goods, especially those from Denmark, where the cartoons where first printed.

"Whoever defames our Prophet should be executed," said Ismail Hassan, 37, a tailor who marched through the pouring rain along with hundreds of other angry Muslims in the West Bank city of Ramallah.

"Bin Laden our beloved, Denmark must be blown up," protesters in Ramallah chanted.

Fundamentalist Muslims protested outside the Danish Embassy in Malaysia, chanting "Long live Islam. Destroy our enemies" and accusing Denmark's Jyllands Posten newspaper, which first published the cartoons, of seeking to incite hatred.

"It's an uncivilized act. It's heinous," said Hanifah Maidin, youth wing spokesman of the Pan-Malaysian Islamic party. "We want the Denmark government to tender an apology to the Muslim world."

Islamic law, based on clerics' interpretation of the Qur'an and the sayings of the prophet, absolutely forbids depictions of the Prophet Muhammad, even positive images, in order to prevent idolatry.

About 800 people protested in Pakistan's capital, Islamabad, chanting "Death to Denmark" and "Death to France," where the cartoons have also been published in a show of press freedom in solidarity with the Danes. Another rally in the southern city of Karachi drew 1,200 people.

Pakistan's parliament unanimously voted to condemn the cartoons as a "vicious, outrageous and provocative campaign" that has "hurt the faith and feelings of Muslims all over the world."

Seeking to diffuse the uproar, Denmark's Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen met with ambassadors from 70 countries, including Egypt, Turkey, Iran and Lebanon.

Egyptian Ambassador Mona Omar Attia said afterward that the Danish leader's response was inadequate and that the country should do more to "appease the whole Muslim world."

In Indonesia, 150 demonstrators hurled eggs at the building housing the Danish Embassy, then stormed in, pushing past security guards.

French Foreign Minister Philippe Douste-Blazy said Friday he was shocked that Islamic hardliners have burned flags to protest the caricatures. But he also criticized the drawings, saying "it isn't normal to caricature a whole religion as an extremist or even terrorist movement."

In Baghdad, Iraq's top Shiite cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, denounced publication of the caricatures. However, he suggested that militant Muslims were partly to blame for projecting "a distorted and dark image of the faith of justice, love and brotherhood."

"Enemies have exploited this . . . to spread their poison and revive their old hatreds with new methods and mechanisms," he said of the cartoons.

In mosques throughout Palestinian cities, Muslim clerics condemned the cartoons. An imam at the Omari Mosque in Gaza City told 9,000 worshippers that those behind the drawings should have their heads cut off.

"If they want a war of religions, we are ready," Hassan Sharaf, an imam in Nablus, said in his sermon.

About 10,000 demonstrators, including Hamas gunmen firing in the air, marched through Gaza City to the Palestinian legislature, where they climbed on the roof, waving green Hamas banners. "We are ready to redeem you with our souls and our blood our beloved Prophet," they chanted. "Down, Down Denmark."

Thousands of protesters in the centre of Nablus burned at least 10 Danish flags. In Jenin, about 1,500 people demonstrated, burning Danish milk and cheese. Hundreds protested in Jericho and protests were held in towns throughout Gaza.

Fearing an outbreak of violence, Israel barred all Palestinians under the age of 45 from praying at Jerusalem's Al Aqsa Mosque compound, Islam's third holiest site.

Nevertheless, about 100 men chanting Islamic slogans and carrying a green Hamas flag demonstrated outside Jerusalem's Old City on Friday afternoon. The crowd scattered when police on horseback arrived, and some of the protesters threw rocks. Police broke up a second demonstration at Damascus Gate with tear gas and stun grenades.

In Gaza City, unknown militants attacked the empty French cultural centre about 2 a.m., shooting at the entrance to the building's garden and throwing a bomb, Palestinian security officials said. No one was injured and there was no damage to the building.

Foreign diplomats, aid workers and journalists began pulling out of Palestinian areas Thursday because of kidnapping threats against some Europeans. Gunmen in Nablus briefly kidnapped Christopher Kasten, a 21-year-old German teaching English at a local school before Palestinian police rescued him unharmed.

A boycott against many European products began to take hold Friday in Gaza supermarkets, despite shortages of some goods due to Israel's two-week closure of the Karni cargo crossing into Gaza.

Noman Malahi, 49, the owner of a store in Gaza, said he threw out three boxes of Danish cheese that he bought just three days ago.

"It cost me 900 shekels (about $200 US) but I am ready to pay nine million to voice my anger over those who had harmed the image of our beloved Prophet," he said. "God willing, they are going to face a hard time, have a collapse in their economy and God also will avenge his prophet. It won't be a surprise if a new tsunami or strong earthquake will hit (Denmark)."
 

AdRiaN

TRIBE Member
Noman Malahi, 49, the owner of a store in Gaza, said he threw out three boxes of Danish cheese that he bought just three days ago.
Throwing out perfectly good cheese? Talk about sacrilege!
 

acheron

TRIBE Member
Here's a link to the Mohammed Image Archive, a collection of depictions of the prophet of Islam over the centuries - right up to, including, and after the current collection of cartoons that are creating such controversy.

http://www.zombietime.com/mohammed_image_archive/

**Warning - some of the caricatures and images are offensive in a general sense, not just to Islamic fundamentalists.
 

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
So do jews get to scream and yell about us using the word 'God' or at the Simpsons or Southpark for depicting 'God'. Technically its completely against there religion as well.

I think maybe any excuse to trash the western world is a good enough reason to burn flags and this is just another example.
 

Taro

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by acheron
Here's a link to the Mohammed Image Archive, a collection of depictions of the prophet of Islam over the centuries - right up to, including, and after the current collection of cartoons that are creating such controversy.

http://www.zombietime.com/mohammed_image_archive/

**Warning - some of the caricatures and images are offensive in a general sense, not just to Islamic fundamentalists.
thanks..
and for the disclaimer
 

Big Harv

TRIBE Member
The Cartoon: "The cartoons included an image of Muhammad wearing a turban shaped as a bomb with a burning fuse."

The hypocritical, violent reaction from across the Muslim world to the cartoon has unfortunately only validated the cartoon's message. The widespread reaction of orthodox Muslims overshadows the more peaceful, cerebral objections to the cartoon made by the moderates:

1. In Indonesia, more than 150 hardline Muslims stormed into a highrise building housing the Danish Embassy to protest the caricatures, then tore down and burned the country's white and red flag. ....the demonstrators, who wore white Arabic-style robes, pelted the building with eggs before pushing their way past security guards into the building's plush lobby......shouting "God is Great," they tried to push into elevators to reach the mission on the building's 25th floor, but were told to stop by protest leaders. Some furniture was damaged in the melee, an Associated Press photographer said.

2. Meanwhile in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Muslims chanted "Destroy our enemies" at a rally Friday outside the Danish Embassy.

3. GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) - Tens of thousands of angry Muslims marched through Palestinian cities, burned the Danish flag and called for vengeance Friday against European countries where caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad were published.

4. Palestinian militants threw a bomb at a French cultural centre in Gaza City

5. Whoever defames our Prophet should be executed," said Ismail Hassan, 37, a tailor who marched through the pouring rain along with hundreds of other angry Muslims in the West Bank city of Ramallah....Bin Laden our beloved, Denmark must be blown up," protesters in Ramallah chanted.


6. About 800 people protested in Pakistan's capital, Islamabad, chanting "Death to Denmark" and "Death to France,"

7. About 10,000 demonstrators, including Hamas gunmen firing in the air, marched through Gaza City to the Palestinian legislature, where they climbed on the roof, waving green Hamas banners. "We are ready to redeem you with our souls and our blood our beloved Prophet," they chanted. "Down, Down Denmark." ....

"God willing, they are going to face a hard time, have a collapse in their economy and God also will avenge his prophet. It won't be a surprise if a new tsunami or strong earthquake will hit (Denmark)."

8. Thousands of protesters in the centre of Nablus burned at least 10 Danish flags. In Jenin, about 1,500 people demonstrated, burning Danish milk and cheese.
 

basilisk

TRIBE Member
Technically, but no one cares that much.

This, on the other hand, is just like trolling on a message board... only the angry parties are entire countries. It makes everyone look bad.

Denmark has thrown a burger back into the car of the Muslim world.
 

Sleepy Giant

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Ditto Much
So do jews get to scream and yell about us using the word 'God' or at the Simpsons or Southpark for depicting 'God'. Technically its completely against there religion as well.

I think maybe any excuse to trash the western world is a good enough reason to burn flags and this is just another example.
You hit the nail on the head.
 

judge wopner

TRIBE Member
i agree that these kinds of depictions stem more from the need to be ignorant than a show of free speech. they would never do that with jewish symbols, at least not to my knowledge in recent years.

but i agree that the goverment of denmark has no place to overturn freedom of speech laws. i dont think anti-hate laws have the same depth in denmark as they do in canada.

interestingly enough, about 1300 women are killed each year in pakistan at the hands of their families for honour killings.

yet we dont see muslims en mass hitting the streets in protest, or muslim majority states clsoing down their embasies in Pakistan, or even refering them to the UN for sanction.

its a case of picking your spots rather poorly.

and the violent reactions by the tiny minority only further entrench the stereotype that the muslim world responds with violence when they have been insulted.
 
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praktik

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Ditto Much
So do jews get to scream and yell about us using the word 'God' or at the Simpsons or Southpark for depicting 'God'. Technically its completely against there religion as well.

I think maybe any excuse to trash the western world is a good enough reason to burn flags and this is just another example.
Man, and Im stuck over HERE. Any time there's some trashing of the western world I jump in, even if there's NO excuse!!

Too bad most of my america-and-the-civilised-west-hating buddies live across oceans...

I wish the ACLU had a Canadian chapter!
 

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
Knowing how serious muslims take their religion I don't understand why they would swat at the hornets nest of the extremists. Then to be defiant about it... seems the message is one of disrespect and indifference.

Just deepen the gulch of misunderstanding a little more... as if it wasn't deep enough already.
 

Lovely N Amazin

TRIBE Member
this morning's the current had an interesting panel re: this issue

i think it's funny how we always rail at the u.s. for relying on empty rhetoric ... while at the same time newspapers all over europe are reprinting cartoons that are very offensive to a large group of people. this is has nothing to do with "freedom of expression", as if it belongs to europe alone :rolleyes:

the endless reprinting of cartoons to prove what exactly? i hate when people manipulate a liberty or a value when what they really want to do is use it to differentiate themselves from the "other". in turn, muslim leaders are doing the same: using uproar and outrage to further their own political ambitions.

since when were freedom of expression and respect, tolerance and appreciation for others culture/religion mutually exclusive?
 

octo

TRIBE Member
Denmark embroiled in Muslim controversy
Feb. 2, 2006. 01:00 AM
HAROON SIDDIQUI


The protracted, still-raging controversy over a Danish newspaper's caricature of the Prophet Muhammad is a case study of the West's troubled relations with Muslims.

It features the easy clichés of the age — freedom of speech vs. Islamic intolerance, and open democratic debate vs. politically correct cravenness.

But what it has actually exposed is the European media's tendency to exploit anti-immigrant, particularly anti-Muslim, bigotry, as well as the Danes' readiness to bow to the gods of commerce.

The story begins last fall when an author complained he could not get an artist to illustrate a children's book about Muhammad's life, given Islam's prohibition against depicting the Prophet, lest it lead to idolatry.

Jyllands-Posten, the conservative mass circulation daily, asked 40 illustrators to defy the ban. On Sept. 30, it published a dozen of their drawings.

One depicted the Prophet as a bearded terrorist, with bulging eyes and a bomb-shaped turban with a burning fuse. Another had him wielding a sword. Another showed him as a crazed, knife-wielding Bedouin. Another placed him at the gates of Heaven telling suicide bombers: "Stop. Stop. We have run out of virgins!''

The first to complain were Danish Muslims. They were ignored. Muslim ambassadors to Denmark asked to meet the prime minister. Anders Fogh Rasmussen refused.

Flemming Rose, the paper's cultural editor, said he had commissioned the cartoons to break the self-censorship he felt had descended on Europe since the 2004 murder of Dutch filmmaker Theo van Gogh by a Muslim (since convicted and sentenced to life imprisonment). Editor Carsten Juste said he saw no reason to apologize.

Prime Minister Rasmussen walked a fine line, denouncing "any expression that attempts to demonize groups on the basis of religion or ethnic background," but adding that "freedom of speech is not negotiable.''

As protests spread worldwide, Editor Juste struck a disingenuous note. "We are sorry if Muslims have been offended."

On Jan. 10, the cartoons were reprinted in Norway in an evangelical Christian newspaper.

Protests continued. The Arab League and the 56-member Organization of the Islamic Conference issued formal condemnations. Last week, Saudi Arabia recalled its ambassador from Denmark. Libya closed its embassy.

A grassroots consumer boycott of Danish and Norwegian products spread from Saudi Arabia across the Arabian Gulf.

Arla Foods — the Danish dairy, which sells about $421 million (U.S.) a year in that region — said sales had come to a "standstill." Other Danish firms also reported lost sales and cancelled business meetings.

In Copenhagen, the Confederation of Danish Industries accused Jyllands-Posten of jeopardizing $1 billion of annual sales to the Middle East.

Editor Juste went back to being defiant. The paper "cannot and will not" apologize. "If we were to, we'd be letting down generations who have fought for freedom of speech. Do we have to give up this right to protect Danish export interests?"

Meanwhile, in Iraq (where Denmark has 530 troops), thousands protested. In the West Bank, Danish flags were burnt. A militant Fatah group demanded that all Danes and Swedes leave the region, apparently confusing Sweden for Norway.

Sweden, Norway and Denmark urged their citizens to avoid travel to the Middle East.

By Monday evening, Jyllands-Posten had caved. "The drawings are not against the Danish law but have indisputably offended many Muslims, for which we shall apologize."

Yesterday, a newspaper in France and another in Germany published the cartoons, citing freedom of the press.

But the issue goes well beyond the old debate over whether freedom of expression has limits. It does in countries like Canada, which have anti-hate laws. But regardless of the presence or absence of legislated limits, every society has its own notions of what is acceptable and what is not.

We can be certain that the editors publishing the Muhammad caricatures would not smear their pages with anti-Semitic graffiti. Or commission drawings maligning the Pope, by depicting him, say, in compromising sexual positions.

And had the editors opted to be that offensive, we can be equally certain that not too many people would have been rushing to their defence.

It is this double standard that's at the heart of the repeated conflicts between the West and the world of Islam over how far anti-Islamic provocateurs can go in baiting Muslims, repeatedly, knowing full well the depth of Muslim feelings about their most cherished beliefs.

Invoking freedom of speech or the need to puncture political correctness are no more than smokescreens to hide that larger, and uglier, truth.

The Danes have neither defended freedom of speech well nor upheld another sacred secular principle, mutual respect between peoples of all faiths.

In balancing these two competing rights in this troubled world at this time, thinking people and responsible public institutions should err on the side of advancing mutual understanding, not fanning more conflicts.
I think it's down right racists and irresponsible of the other European papers to have reprinted the cartoons.

i want to see all those papers publish caricatures of Jesus fucking choir boys and something that would be just as offensive to Jews. then we'll see what happens.
 

Hal-9000

TRIBE Member
I say fuck 'em.

I've seen depictions of Jews in Middle Eastern cartoons that are straight of Nazi papers.
 

Hi i'm God

TRIBE Member
What’s so strange about all this I was watching SPIKE between STNG and STDS9 there was a commercial and it had in it what looked like a mortal combat type video game with Moses vs. Muhammad. It shows Moses taking Muhammad's head clean off by tossing one of the Ten Commandments tablets at him.

So why pick on the Danish? Will we have to fight off Muslims claim to Hans Island now that Jihad will destroy Denmark?!











:D
 

Littlest Hobo

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Boss Hog
Just deepen the gulch of misunderstanding a little more... as if it wasn't deep enough already.
"Sorry we slaughtered the people at Bali/WTC/Munich/honour killings/all sorts of crazy shit. 'Tis a misunderstanding!"

Any goodwill moderates had towards the religon of peace is quickly being pissed away by this cartoonish (ha ha) stupidity.





Above is just one example of anti-Semitism in the arab media, but you don't see Jews acting like savages. Fuck, at Mecca the powers that be regularily lead the pilgrams in chants of "Death to America, Death to Israel". You cannot discount this viciousness.
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
I think there are reasons for this behaviour, that are being quietly ignored. It is much easier to talk about moral platitudes than it is to determine the historical reasons for such behaviour.
 

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Littlest Hobo

Above is just one example of anti-Semitism in the arab media, but you don't see Jews acting like savages. Fuck, at Mecca the powers that be regularily lead the pilgrams in chants of "Death to America, Death to Israel". You cannot discount this viciousness.

You're talking about extremists, not the entire nation of Islam.

By lampooning people's faith (and not just for humour - there's obvious undertones here) you're only going to create more indignance and push more people toward extremism. Or at least make people more sympathetic to extremists.

Something for people to think about as they push the issue.
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Hal-9000
Socialized religiosity that leads to an irrational collective consciousness, perhaps? ;)
I have no trouble blaming religion for a lot of things. I wonder, though, why other countries with equally-violent and culturally-integrated religions don't exhibit the same behaviours?

Or maybe they do, and we just aren't hearing about it...
 
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