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What's the big deal with getting a passport?

dig this

TRIBE Member
Is it cause it costs $80 every 5 years? Is it the pain in the ass to get a notary's signature and to get some photo's taken?? I don't get it... Why is it such a big deal to expect people to have a passport when they cross international borders, especially in a time like this?

I keep on hearing that it'll cost business X amount of money since there is so much trade between our two countries... but what is stopping the people that are doing business between the two countries from getting a passport?

It just seems like this is getting blown out of proportion. It's not like we're getting retinal scans or fingerprinted.

your thoughts?
 

Hi i'm God

TRIBE Member
dig this said:
Why is it such a big deal to expect people to have a passport when they cross international borders, especially in a time like this?

it cause it costs $80 every 5 years? Is it the pain in the ass to get a notary's signature and to get some photo's taken??
fix'd
 

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
If your a family of 4 going down to the US it would cost about $300 more if you had to have a passport. For a small family doing the road trip down to florida or for instance checking out montreal from new york state this may very well represent 1/4 - 1/2 of the total budget. It does take a couple of weeks and you have to take your kids to get pictures and to get the forms all signed and sealed.

Honestly its more a matter that it takes a while costs money and is pretty silly.
 

AdRiaN

TRIBE Member
The United States is working on developing a credit card sized identification card as an alternative to passports. Canada must decide whether it wants to introduce a similar identification card, which would be cheaper to obtain than a passport.

The main obstacle is the very tight timeline to develop and distribute these cards before the deadline of January 1, 2008.
 

Shug

TRIBE Member
Isn't that card supposedly biometric-based? Ie, encoded fingerprints, DNA, etc etc etc... I thought I read somewhere that the biometric angle was why Canada was balking...
 
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~atp~

TRIBE Member
AdRiaN said:
The main obstacle is the very tight timeline to develop and distribute these cards before the deadline of January 1, 2008.
The other major concern is the legality of that card in the face of PIPEDA.

Integration with American policy is sound when the interests of both countries are respected, not politically leveraged.
 

AdRiaN

TRIBE Member
Shug said:
Isn't that card supposedly biometric-based? Ie, encoded fingerprints, DNA, etc etc etc... I thought I read somewhere that the biometric angle was why Canada was balking...
The cards will be embedded with a radio-frequency chip that can be read at border crossings, and will contain the same information as a passport.

I believe discussion of biometric cards took place in Canada a couple of years ago as part of a Parliamentary Committee on immigration issues. The idea was rejected.
 
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Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
Nah but a Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus would be cool, or any of the following would be nice.

British Guiana
British Honduras
British West Indies
Burma
Dutch Guiana
East Samoa
Netherlands East Indies
New Hebrides
Rhodesia
South Vietnam
Spanish Guinea
Zanzibar
 
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Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
Now we can offer you diplomatic credentials from a EUROPEAN COUNTRY.

Our costs (the only costs you will have to pay) are US$ 40.000.

25% of this sum has to be paid upfront, the remaining amount after you have received all your paperwork directly from the State Department of the concerned country.

PROCEDURE:

1. Contact us by e-mailing your resume.
2. We will evaluate your resume, and get back to you shortly.
3. In case you are a suitable candidate, we will ask to transfer 25% of the cost and the following documents:

* Passport Pages showing photograph, signature, passport number, date, and place of issue are required. Pages with country entry/exit stamps are not required.
* A Certificate of Good Conduct.
* Character Reference. An original testimonial of good character is required from two references (this must not be family members). References may be a doctor, lawyer, accountant, and bank official or other professional. The name, address and phone numbers of the references are required.
* Health Certificate. The Health Certificate must show that the applicant is not suffering from any contagious or communicable disease, including HIV.
* Eight passport size color photographs are required. These must all be from the same negative.

4. Your Application will be processed, and in about 10 weeks, you will receive your documents directly from the State Department of the concerned country by courier. Thereafter the remaining fee has to be paid.
5. You will now be able to request the “Exequatur” from your local and federal authorities of your country, and you will receive diplomatic immunity according to your diplomatic position and the Vienna Convention making you a fully-fledged diplomat.

ORDER NOW

A WORD OF CAUTION: We will refuse any application should we have reason to believe that the Passport may be used for criminal purpose!
 

416

TRIBE Member
I don't see a problem with this. It's their country and they want a uniform and dependable way to figure out who's coming into it. Seems perfectly resonable to me.
 

alcid

TRIBE Member
Ditto Much said:
Yes I could use a couple!! Do you have any belonging to countries that no longer exsist?
I stayed with a guy at a B&B in Paris who had a passport that said "Origin Unknown" as his official country. He said it was because he was an orphan from WWII, and he really doesn't know where he was born, but I think he was really a spy. He used to work as a photographer for National Geographic. If that's not a spy's carreer, I don't know what is!
 

dig this

TRIBE Member
alcid said:
I stayed with a guy at a B&B in Paris who had a passport that said "Origin Unknown" as his official country. He said it was because he was an orphan from WWII, and he really doesn't know where he was born, but I think he was really a spy. He used to work as a photographer for National Geographic. If that's not a spy's carreer, I don't know what is!
did you ever catch him talking into his shoe in german?
 
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Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
No plan for Canadian ID card
Day rules out `expectations' of U.S.-style border pass
Deadline for passport requirement on track, Chertoff says
Apr. 19, 2006. 01:00 AM
TIM HARPER
WASHINGTON BUREAU

WASHINGTON—Public Safety Minister Stockwell Day says the Conservative government has no plans to produce a secure identity card for Canadians crossing the U.S. border.

That means, barring an amendment to legislation in the U.S. Congress, Canadians crossing into the United States at land borders beginning Jan. 1, 2008 will need a passport — or will be sent home.

Day's comments, following a meeting with U.S. Homeland Security chief Michael Chertoff, marked the first time Ottawa has flatly ruled out its own version of an identity card which Americans will be required to carry to re-enter their country.

The U.S. card will be cheaper than a passport, easily obtained and there will be discounts for families.

There had been an expectation here that Canada would respond in kind, but Day said he did not want to "raise expectations'' that his government would develop something that could be cheaper and more easily obtained by Canadians than a passport.

"We're not actively pursuing something different at this point,'' Day said.

He said Americans will be asked for proof of identity as they enter the U.S. and Canadians can carry passports to cross at the U.S. border.

"We're not suggesting at this time that we're launching into a program of a Canadian identity card or anything of that nature.

"We're looking at telling these Canadians that as these deadlines approach ... that Canadians travelling to the United States will still have full access with their passport as they have had in the past."

Canadians travelling to the U.S. by air or sea will need passports Jan. 1, 2007.

There have been some suggestions within the U.S. administration that the technological requirements and the need to train staff could delay the implementation of the 2008 law.

But Chertoff indicated he wanted to make the deadlines written into the legislation, just as U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and President George W. Bush did following recent meetings with their Canadian counterparts.

"In terms of legislation, I guess anything is possible, but I think we have to work with the law as it currently exists,'' Chertoff said. "We think this a deadline we can meet.''

Only one in four Americans has a passport, which cost $97 (U.S.), but are good for 10 years.

The new U.S. PASS card is likely to cost about $49.

More Canadians (about 39 per cent) have passports, but those who do not, must spend $87 for a document that is valid for only five years.

One U.S. lawmaker from a border state, Democratic Senator Byron Dorgan of North Dakota, has called for an exemption for Americans under 17, and has suggested that free day passes be made available at border crossings and the new cards here cost no more than $20 (U.S.).

---------------


Evidently Harper agree's with you on this one. Passports make sense and are able to be used everywhere.
 

DTD

TRIBE Member
416 said:
I don't see a problem with this. It's their country and they want a uniform and dependable way to figure out who's coming into it. Seems perfectly resonable to me.
They already know who is coming and going but now they want to know where you are going and what you are doing (rfid chips...) ??? You think that is ok too?? Not me.
 
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