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What's good for tonite (friday)

DjCao

TRIBE Member
i want to check another places....something aside system, fluid or element...
any word of advice ?

or wisdom ;)

Oscar
 

DjCao

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by exrboy
I know how you feel. And this is the answer :)

any more info on this ?
kind of music, crowd, etc...

i may be checking Ice Lounge or Betty Ford Temple...
Found them on Now Magazine
:confused:
 

exrboy

TRIBE Promoter
Originally posted by DjCao
any more info on this ?
kind of music, crowd, etc...

i may be checking Ice Lounge or Betty Ford Temple...
Found them on Now Magazine
:confused:

I have no idea guy. The way I see it..it's only $10, byob and close to my house so it works for me. There is an article on Jeff in this week's Eye by Denise Benson (great last name btw ;)

Rarely does a week pass without an aspiring producer asking me what it takes to have his or her music released. Each time, I respond with the same piece of advice: mail demo CDs to record labels with whom you share a musical affinity. Obvious perhaps, but no matter how good your music is, it won't be put out by somebody unless that somebody actually hears it.

Tech-house darling Jeff Samuel can attest to this. DJing for the past eight years and creating music for the past six, Samuel managed to capture the interest and investment of revered label heads like Dan Bell (7th City), Steve Bug (Pokerflat) and Triple R and Jacqueline Klein (Trapez) simply by doing a mail-out.

"I don't have connections," he laughs over the phone. "People seem to think there's some mystical thing going on for me to have hooked up with all of these people, but it's really just a matter of sending them your music. I've met a lot of really talented people just here in Seattle -- half of them are better than me -- but they don't send their demos out. Labels look for music. It's not so complicated."

A rock dude who warmed to techno and house after leaving his home of Cleveland for Ohio State University in Columbus, this classically trained pianist fell for early Chicago and Detroit sounds. Heroes included Juan Atkins, Claude Young, Morgan Geist, Dan Curtain, Dan Bell and Columbus' own Titonton Duvante. Now his sexy, techy, minimal and heavily melodic creations stand alongside those of his role models. Personally, I'm hooked on his ability to reference Detroit, Warp and hip-hop all at once.

"I've always liked the blippy stuff, sounds with a real short duration, and go after that for sure. I also take a lot of my basslines from hip-hop stuff. People seem to compare me most to Dan Bell, maybe because this is something that he and I share. We like a lot of the same stuff."

Samuel's sense of humour sets him apart, however. Though not particularly playful in conversation concerning his day job creating sound effects for a forthcoming "massive, multi-player, online game called Mythica," the producer is happy to share his obviously quirky personality in the music he makes.

"I'm a big goof," he laughs. "I joke around a lot, and I think that comes through to a degree. Most of my friends from back home are not into techno at all, and if they hear my music they say, 'Oh, well, that sounds like you.' I take that as a much bigger compliment than any techno magazine could give me."

Watch for forthcoming Jeff Samuel releases on Trapez, Spectral Sound and Morris/Audio.
 
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