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What are you doing to prepare for the coronavirus??

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
The city should be building field hospitals now. Not when 10,000 people show up at St. Mikes in a week or 2.
 

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
Withdraw some cash from ATM today (sunday) because the markets and banks might collapse or freeze up next week.

It is easy for them to switch ATMs off en mass. Or there might be runs on the banks, just sayin.

Spare cash on hand is a good idea if you can do that.
 

kennyboy

TRIBE Member
My Mom also used to say larder. Old school English. Especially relevant for baconpan lovers like me.
Well, it was either a larder or the pantry.
As for the Zombie apocalypse and the 3 week + March break, I have all the food, booze, and the bikes are tuned up and ready for a spring cycle. Get outside and welcome spring.

What could possibly be the greatest casualty in all of this is the possibility of my wife working from home for the next 3 weeks with myself and our daughter. (LOL).
 
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rave jedi

TRIBE Member
Withdraw some cash from ATM today (sunday) because the markets and banks might collapse or freeze up next week.

It is easy for them to switch ATMs off en mass. Or there might be runs on the banks, just sayin.

Spare cash on hand is a good idea if you can do that.
Alex, I saw your post and followed your advice this morning. My stupid branch ATM machine randomly changed its daily limit on how much I was allowed to withdraw. The ATM must have been reset to cap the amount people are allowed to take out of their bank account. Once this bullshit happened with my ATM, I immediately went to see a human being bank teller to withdraw more money.
 

praktik

TRIBE Member
^^ I'm not so concerned about the ability to access money, food or supplies.

But then again I dont have kids and it's just me and the wife. So far I am not seeing even in hard hit areas around the world that people can't retrieve money or get food when they need it.

Not to say it won't BECOME an issue.

So mostly I'm just continuing my normal habits of working from home and we're cancelling social events and so on.

Booking flights and accommodations for a trip to Azores/Portugal in August - ensuring everything is cancel-able.... Im thinking more and more that trip won't happen....
 

Mondieu

TRIBE Member
Are you fellow tribers prepared for this thing that's coming?
I’ll be riding it out in Mexico, 1 block from the brand new hospital in Bucerias, provided they don’t cancel my flight - which is a return trip, so the airline company will be flying me home regardless. Canada/US/Mexico are open for the time being. Might be a few days later than planned, if they shut the borders but I have a contingency for lodgings down there. Apparently all the foreigners have fled. I’m going the other way. Medical is essential.
 

praktik

TRIBE Member
Also lots of changes @ work but im in lucky position of this generating MORE work for us not less.... and able to work from home. so I have some alright context now vs others where challenges might be greater on employment/family file.

I DO Have a slight sore throat and have been feeling OFF a bit since yesterday - shitty time to have ANY symptoms cause you're like - IS THIS COVID 19??
 
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alexd

Administrator
Staff member
It is really hard to know what to do financially. I do have a small bit of cash and a small bit of gold (which took a beating today but will come back because it really is the only safe haven now the markets are in freefall. Also have some have trading beads I picked up in Africa years ago if it comes to that.
I still have enough cannabis left over from the plant I grew in the garden last year to last me until July for my knee. It is also helping with the anxiety. Thank you plant. If I really was prudent I could make my existing food last for 2 months. I'm thinking it might be wise to stretch it out because I suspect our supply chains for food will be impacted once the US hits full scale disease cases. Also the flights are being cancelled or reduced 50% or more now so that also impacts air freight for food imports. They could also shut the border with the US at any instant but I think Trudeau won't do it unless the US does first. What I am saying is don't eat all your best stuff now in hopes of buying more. Best to be careful. This isolation thing could be prolonged.
Hopefully the government will develop strategies and plans to allow people to buy food and restock basics once the disease takes hold here in Toronto and everyone is sick or contagious.
 

Bernnie Federko

TRIBE Member
Was there any mention of supply chain issues in Wuhan/Hubei province during the outbreak? Or Italy?

We left the city for Prince Edward County on Sunday. So far nowhere I've seen or heard real systemic issues of supply, only fear driven stories and behaviour that aren't justified. I think where possible support local business, and keep a couple of weeks worth of shit in the larder/freezer, contact your bank to ask about a line of credit (not a credit card), and remain psychologically present. It's more than likely going to work out okay.
 

Bernnie Federko

TRIBE Member
/THE CANADIAN PRESS
The empty grocery store shelves that have become symbolic of COVID-19 anxieties are mostly due to “panic buying" and not indicative of larger supply problems, major retailers and experts say.
“There is enough food being manufactured. There is enough food capable of being shipped,” said Karl Littler, senior vice-president of public affairs at the Retail Council of Canada, which represents most of the country’s major grocery chains including Loblaws, Metro and Sobeys. “There’s not actually a shortage of food.”
In statements to The Globe and Mail, major grocery retailers reiterated this. “We do not feel that there is a cause for concern as there is a significant supply of essential items," said Anthony Longo, president of Longo’s. Loblaws chairman Galen Weston, meanwhile, said that “volumes are already normalizing somewhat, and we are catching up.”

And at a press conference Monday, Health Minister Patty Hajdu urged Canadians against buying more than what they need for a two-week period. “We are not running out of food,” she said.
A big reason behind the temporary shortages is most major retailers have moved in recent years to a “just-enough," "just-in-time” supply chain approach, said Sylvain Charlebois, a professor in food distribution and policy at Dalhousie University.

With grocers moving towards smaller stores (particularly in major urban centres), they have relied heavily on logistics in order to maximize efficiency in their supply chains, and to prevent retail locations from holding excess stock at any given time.

And while such systems result in lower prices and reduced amounts of food waste, it also means they are less resilient to major spikes in demand.
“That’s why, even if people see empty shelves, it doesn’t mean that the company has run out of products," Prof. Charlebois said. "It’s just because that demand on that day, in that particular store, is strong.”
It is not a coincidence that the first images of panic buying began to circulate about a week ago out of British Columbia, he added. That’s where many of Canada’s first coronavirus cases were clustered, and where the country’s first recorded COVID-19 death occurred.
Not long after, Jim Mackie, owner of Jim’s Independent Grocers in Vanderhoof, B.C., said he started seeing a dramatic uptick in shopping at his store – about a 40 per cent increase in sales this past week compared with the same period last year. He said he has been having difficulty keeping certain items, such as pasta and toilet paper, in stock. “It’s hard to keep up,” he said. “People are panic buying.”

At the family-owned Nature’s Fare Markets – also in B.C. – director of marketing Stephanie Thatcher said they too have seen an increase in demand. Still, she said, “our supply chain remains strong and we don’t anticipate any shortages.”
Shortly after the B.C. images began circulating online, similar photos of empty store shelves began to appear out of Ontario, another province particularly hard hit by coronavirus.
Prof. Charlebois predicts that as the Atlantic provinces see increases in cases of confirmed COVID-18, we will see similar instances of panic buying there too. “Everyone has a different way of coping with anxiety and uncertainty,” he said.
Even if the situation with coronavirus continues to intensify and borders are eventually shut down, Canada is in a relatively enviable position, said Evan Fraser, director of the Arrell Food Institute at the University of Guelph. While we are heavily reliant on certain imported food – particularly fresh produce and processed products from the United States – he said Canada is still reasonably self-sufficient.
“Not across all categories, but in total, we are a net food exporter.”
He pointed to the fact that Canada is a major producer of many food products – grains and beef in particular, and certain supply-managed products, such as dairy and chicken.

The disruptions to grocery stores appear to have extended to online orders. On Monday afternoon, some shoppers attempting to place web orders for pickup from Loblaws were met with a splash screen saying the retailer was experiencing “an exceptional volume of traffic" to its site.


Source: As shutdowns occur across the country, are Canada’s grocery stores able to cope?
 
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Klubmasta Will

TRIBE Member
After today, I am heading to our cottage in Prince Edward County with my family, my sister's family, and our mother, for a week or so. My employer is mandating that employees who can work from home start working from home.

My mother is 85 years old with diabetes, which puts her in the highest risk category. Based on statistics I've found, the fatality rate for someone in my mother's condition upon contracting the virus seems to be at least 15%, which is far too high for comfort.

Fortunately, the fatality rate for kids under 10 is close to Nil.

Stay safe, everyone!
 

kennyboy

TRIBE Member
Also lots of changes @ work but im in lucky position of this generating MORE work for us not less.... and able to work from home. so I have some alright context now vs others where challenges might be greater on employment/family file.

I DO Have a slight sore throat and have been feeling OFF a bit since yesterday - shitty time to have ANY symptoms cause you're like - IS THIS COVID 19??
After today, I am heading to our cottage in Prince Edward County with my family, my sister's family, and our mother, for a week or so. My employer is mandating that employees who can work from home start working from home.

My mother is 85 years old with diabetes, which puts her in the highest risk category. Based on statistics I've found, the fatality rate for someone in my mother's condition upon contracting the virus seems to be at least 15%, which is far too high for comfort.

Fortunately, the fatality rate for kids under 10 is close to Nil.

Stay safe, everyone!
Make sure load up on all required supplies along the way if you don't already have them.

I was at the Superstore (Loblaws ) in Kitchener this morning to grab a couple items for my daughter. Not busy at all and pleased to see many signs limiting a number of key staple items to maximum 2. And a kind note to think of others and share.

Kind of weird to see it so quiet given that it's March break. I'm sure there are plenty of people staying put. I have 3 family members on a 14 day shutdown as just got back from the US.

Look after yourself and others.
 

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
Today's NYT The Daily was terrifying. They interviewed a front line doctor in Italy. It's worth a listen because this will be Canada in a week or 2.

Afterwards I had a sense that we are also in for some global political instability when this hits the US full on. As soon as a million or more Americans die (which is the trajectory) they may demand the president strike back at China militarily. Or the president may do this on his own initiative to make it even.

The Chinese must also be taking this into consideration, and it may really be why they declared those US journos persona non Grata today.
 
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alexd

Administrator
Staff member
After today, I am heading to our cottage in Prince Edward County with my family, my sister's family, and our mother, for a week or so. My employer is mandating that employees who can work from home start working from home.

My mother is 85 years old with diabetes, which puts her in the highest risk category. Based on statistics I've found, the fatality rate for someone in my mother's condition upon contracting the virus seems to be at least 15%, which is far too high for comfort.

Fortunately, the fatality rate for kids under 10 is close to Nil.

Stay safe, everyone!
Be safe. xo
 
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alexd

Administrator
Staff member
I have a feeling that even if we as a country and as individuals execute flawlessly against this virus, we will still have to deal with wave after wave of re-infection coming at us from the United States. They are absolutely fucked, and because of our border so are we.

The only real hope lies in the development of a vaccine or treatments against the disease itself.
 

praktik

TRIBE Member
I have a feeling that even if we as a country and as individuals execute flawlessly against this virus, we will still have to deal with wave after wave of re-infection coming at us from the United States. They are absolutely fucked, and because of our border so are we.

The only real hope lies in the development of a vaccine or treatments against the disease itself.
On the same topic:

 
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