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Trump Presidency

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SneakyPete

TRIBE Member


“No President has done more for the Evangelical community, and it’s not even close,” Trump said in his tweets. He declared that he “won’t be reading ET again!” using the wrong initials to describe the Christian publication.
I don't think he has read a single sentence from that magazine.
 
Kind of funny how Franklin Graham, Bill Graham's son and his dad being the founder of the magazine, says it's wrong.

I'm actually hoping that Pelosi doesn't take the impeachment to the Senate and keeps it in a holding pattern. It'll drive Trump nuts and neuters McConnell worse than his wedding night.
 
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Bernnie Federko

TRIBE Member
More than 99% of the Trump campaign's TV ads this year discussed impeachment, as tallied by the nonpartisan Wesleyan Media Project.

  • Over the past three months, the Trump campaign talked impeachment in 4,594 television ads costing $4.4 million.
Why it matters: This is a vivid new illustration of the alacrity with which the Trump campaign is embracing the stain of impeachment to raise money, rev up the base, and try to build a head of steam against whoever emerges as the Democratic nominee.

  • The Trump campaign declined to comment.
The tally covers national cable and broadcast TV between Jan. 5 and Dec. 14.

  • 99.2% of Trump's 2019 ads were about impeachment, according to Wesleyan, which issued the report in partnership with the Center for Responsive Politics.
  • What about the other .8%? "Between the start of the year and October, he aired just 36 ads on broadcast television or national cable, none of them mentioning the prospect of impeachment," the report says.
 

Bernnie Federko

TRIBE Member
Remember the numpty nump in this thread saying that Donny America was doing great talking to the Korean dictator?


In his sharpest criticism yet of his old workplace, John Bolton suggested the Trump administration is bluffing about stopping North Korea's nuclear ambitions — and soon might need to admit publicly that its policy failed badly.

  • Bolton told me in an interview that he does not think the administration "really means it" when President Trump and top officials vow to stop North Korea from having deliverable nuclear weapons — "or it would be pursuing a different course."
Why now? The president's former national security adviser, who served until September, is speaking out ahead of an end-of-year timetable.

If Kim Jong-un follows through on his threatened Christmas provocation, Bolton says the White House should do something "that would be very unusual" for this administration: admit they got it wrong on North Korea.

  • "The idea that we are somehow exerting maximum pressure on North Korea is just unfortunately not true," Bolton said.
  • For example, he said, the U.S. Navy could start intercepting oil that is illegally being transferred to North Korea at sea.
  • As Bolton sees it, the administration now has more of a "rhetorical policy" that it's unacceptable for North Korea to have nuclear weapons that could hit America or its allies.
  • If Kim thumbs his nose at the U.S., Bolton said, he hopes the administration will say: "We've tried. The policy's failed. We're going to go back now and make it clear that in a variety of steps, together with our allies, when we say it's unacceptable, we're going to demonstrate we will not accept it."
  • Bolton described his concerns about Trump's North Korea strategy in an interview with Axios late last week. He went significantly further than any of his previous remarks since leaving the administration.
Why it matters: Kim is back on his white horse, and the North Korean nuclear threat may be greater than ever, analysts say.

  • North Korea has intimated it will test some kind of advanced weapons in the coming weeks — weapons it's developed as Trump has tried to woo Kim.
  • Trump's top envoy to North Korea, Deputy Secretary of State Stephen Biegun, said recently that if North Korea follows through on that threat, it would be "most unhelpful in achieving a lasting peace on the Korean Peninsula."
  • Bolton called Biegun's statement "a late entry but a clear winner in the Understatement of the Year Award contest."
Bolton, who has advocated for a more aggressive North Korea strategy, also criticized Trump for saying earlier this year that Kim's short-range missile tests don't bother him.

  • "When the president says, 'Well, I'm not worried about short-range missiles,' he's saying, 'I'm not worried about the potential risk to American troops deployed in the region or our treaty allies, South Korea and Japan.'"
The big picture: The imminent threats from North Korea seem a world away from June 2018, when Trump returned from his Singapore summit with Kim to boast, "There is no longer a nuclear threat from North Korea."

  • In reality, Kim has expanded his nuclear arsenal since then, analysts say.
  • Using data from analysts and governments around the world, Japan's Nagasaki University estimated in June that Kim now has as many as 30 nuclear warheads. That's on the lower end of estimates, and it's up from as many as 20 warheads in the same study last year.
  • "Even though they're not testing right now, they're operating at full tempo," said Victor Cha, the National Security Council director for Asia under President George W. Bush and Korea chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.
  • The Trump administration declined to comment.
Go deeper: Read the full story about Trump's North Korea policy amid Kim Jong-un's fresh threats.
 

Bernnie Federko

TRIBE Member
Quote du jour
"We’ll have an economy based on wind. I never understood wind. You know, I know windmills very much. I've studied it better than anybody I know. It's very expensive. They're made in China and Germany mostly — very few made here, almost none. But they're manufactured tremendous — if you're into this — tremendous fumes. Gases are spewing into the atmosphere. You know we have a world, right? So the world is tiny compared to the universe. So tremendous, tremendous amount of fumes and everything. You talk about the carbon footprint — fumes are spewing into the air. Right? Spewing. Whether it's in China, Germany, it's going into the air. It's our air, their air, everything — right?
— From the White House transcript of President Trump's speech to the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit in West Palm Beach on Saturday.
 

Mondieu

TRIBE Member
Seasons greetings, from the Orange Clown.

If anyone puts the “Jesus H. Christ!” in Christmas, it’s this turkey...

 
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Bernnie Federko

TRIBE Member
"President Trump is promising voters a world free of the everyday inconveniences associated with combating climate change — rolling back lightbulb regulations, ordering a study on low-flow toilets and turning bans on plastic straws into a campaign rallying cry," the WashPost's Toluse Olorunnipa and Juliet Eilperin write.

  • Trump on toilets (Dec. 6, Roosevelt Room): "People are flushing toilets 10 times, 15 times, as opposed to once. They end up using more water. So, EPA is looking at that very strongly, at my suggestion."
  • Trump on wind (Sunday, West Palm Beach): "I never understood wind. You know, I know windmills very much. I’ve studied it better than anybody I know. ... They’re noisy. They kill the birds. You want to see a bird graveyard? You just go. Take a look. A bird graveyard. Go under a windmill someday. "
 
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praktik

TRIBE Member
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