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True Detective (HBO)

Spinsah

TRIBE Member
I really hope we get a good ending, but there's been so much red herrings and little jabs at possible clues - like the Revival Preacher's coffee mug (it's a John Deere mug - a yellow stag), or the two kids that Harrelson beat up - the blonde wearing a t-shirt with black stars,
Sure, there's a lot of fun little Easter eggs, but I think Pizzolatto is taking jabs at those who obsess over the wrong things in television series, those who are quick to draw that conclusion that Tuttle's yellow tie must mean he's the Yellow King, or that the John Deere logo might suggest something similar. That's mistaking the forest for the trees.

What did Hart say in the first episode? "You attach an assumption to a piece of evidence, you start to bend the narrative to support it and prejudice yourself."

There will be no literal Lovercraftian monsters in the final act, there will just be people caught doing horrible things. Isn't that scary enough?
 

kyfe

TRIBE Member
Because he contradicts himself all the time and generally seems to long for deeper meanings, connections, etc. The death of his daughter and wife obviously took a toll on him and you can see by the way he unloads on Marty for fucking up his marriage. Yet, when Maggie has her way with him, he's complicit but then resentful - she symbolized a lot to him and giving into his own irrational desires, however fleeting, suggests to me that he's a deeply conflicted man. Maybe it's not a demon creeping in at the side of his eyes, but something all together more human.

When Cohle's spinning up a monologue, like he was when observing the revival tent, Hart is quick to point out to him: "When you get to talking like this, you sound panicked."
I'll buy that for a dollar
 

janiecakes

TRIBE Member
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DJ Vuvu Zela

TRIBE Member
To a point, I agree, but it's an eight episode series, and you can make the same argument about race - especially for a story set it a state like Louisiana. It's glaring that it too goes largely untreated.
i'd say you can make the same argument for every character outside of Marty & Rust. It's their story. Everyone else is secondary.

If you had to rank what character received the most development it would clearly be Maggie, although her screen time is understandably far behind.

I really hate this sort of knee jerk politically correct dissection. It reminds me of the talk about the portrayal of races on Game of Thrones.

What a terrible thing it would be to force the show's creatives to bean count every gender and race depiction to please some quota instead of focusing on telling the story as best they can.
 

Spinsah

TRIBE Member
But the men aren't segregated from women the way blacks are segregated from whites.
Sure they are. It's not by chance that come 2012, the two detectives interviewing Rust and Cohle are black, as noticeably before that, in their 1995-2001 tenure it was still a white boys only club. Similarly, women are absent from the police force and exist mainly in that world outside the domestic sphere as whores and dead bodies. 2012 is very different, the way Maggie interviews with Gilbough and Palpania suggest she's become more than a cop's wife, but they don't see her for that.

Even as the story passes over Cohle's relationship between 1995-2002, he sweaty and uninvolved - he's not present in that world. I think calling for that character and relationship to be fleshed out would be losing narrative focus. Cohle is a lonely egoist and it's absolutely intentional that with the exception of Maggie, the only relationships that seem to matter to him are the ones he has with dead bodies.
 

Spinsah

TRIBE Member

ndrwrld

TRIBE Member
What a terrible thing it would be to force the show's creatives to bean count every gender and race depiction to please some quota instead of focusing on telling the story as best they can.
or telling the story the way they originally wanted to.
 
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Spinsah

TRIBE Member
That was a good read. And those illustrations! So awesome.

I think it's great that we're talking about True Detective in terms of character, gender and misogyny rather than obsessing over whether the Vietnamese sub shop owner is the Yellow King because his store's sign has a crown on it.
 

stryker

TRIBE Member
A more positive take from Grantland on True Detective's women: Her Looming Shadow Grows: The Complex Women of ‘True Detective’ «
Wow...that is a really good article.

I think it's a bit foolish for people to think that the show is misogynistic towards woman. The entire culture is flawed. Pizzolaato is doing a great job at conveying an exaggerated version of the tragedy of Louisiana. From the Pelican bay misery, to the spineless Cop Shop, to the Biker bars, projects and trailer parks. Everyone appears to be drowning in their own private hell, except for the monsters at the top of the food chain.

FFS..even Maggie's parents are a pain in the ass.

Stew
 
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coleridge

TRIBE Member
From this article:

Who Is True Detective's Yellow King? Here Are Our 6 Favorite Theories | Underwire | Wired.com

The Lawnmower Guy is the Yellow King

This one feels a bit more anticlimatic than Rust being the King—a bayou version of “the butler did it”—but the semi-regular appearances of Errol the lawnmower guy give him enough of a presence to feel like an unexpected culprit without coming completely out of left field. Sure, he seems like a simpleton, but what if he’s much more? With his green clothes, scraggly hair and beard, he also looks a bit like the “Spaghetti Monster” the young girl said chased her through the woods.

On a symbolic level, one of the earliest fights between Rust and Marty—and the foreshadowing of Maggie’s infidelity—was Rust mowing Marty’s lawn when he wasn’t there. If lawnmowing is linked to sexual transgressions, what could that means about a man who devotes his life to it? And what lies under that beard, anyway? Could it be the scars that Dora’s friend said were on the face of the man who visited her before her death, the same ones the rescued girl told Cohle was on the very worst of her abusers?
 
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Metal Morphosis

TRIBE Member
we've been deleting the episodes off of the PVR as we watch them and I'm kind of annoyed that we did that b/c now i want to go back and re-watch them all!
is there a chance the simpleton at the religious tent who was interviewed is also the lawnmower guy? i remember that guy was wearing glasses and he 'checked out' but can't remember exactly what he looked like and if he's the same dude as lawnmower guy.
 

ndrwrld

TRIBE Member
pretty sure simpleton at the tent is not lawnmower man.
i went back to episode 3...lawnmower guy had a beard.
in ep 7, it's much shorter and you can see the scars.
but they do look like the same guy.
 
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