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tribe help: therapy of the physio

Mephisto

TRIBE Member
after an encounter with a physiotherapist last night at a club it's come to my attention that after numerous drunken (and embarassingly sober) falls, 10 years of pitching, an abomination of a golf swing, countless impacts from a variety of angles and heights from bikes/snowboarding with an assortment of inanimate objects such as car doors, trees but namely the earth itself have taken their toll and left me a mangled mess of clickity tickity joints, misaligned lumbar and a range of motion comparable to that of a mummy. from the highly scientific check up that was performed to the 'hung up' on the dancefloor she said something about instability in both shoulders, a "torn ACJ", and managed to make my knees buckle after bending my wrist a certain way to pinpoint a chronic elbow injury i've been nursing for some time now.

i want to fix these impurities and make myself bionic. or, at least just be able to ride my bike without the searing pain in my shoulder/elbow and also not feel like there's a pixie fairy taking an acetyline torch to the underside of my kneecaps the day after. or, maybe just taking a tshirt off without pain would be nice on weekends. if anyone can point me to a sports clinic or licensed (for my paramedical coverage) physiotherapist that deals with this stuff it would make the world a better place for me :)
 
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deep

TRIBE Member
The PT I've worked with really knows her stuff, but she is not in the GTA. Then again, you are a pilot and could possibly land on the street near her clinic just like in SWAT.
 

Interchange

TRIBE Promoter
The Sports Medicine Specialists
150 Eglinton Ave. East
Toronto, ON M4P 1E8
phone: 416-481-1601

This is where i have been going for years of whip lash from car accidents that have cause my neck/shoulder/wrist to all be effected
 
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junglisthead

TRIBE Member
i have had physio done to me three times now, and perhaps its just the physiotherapists

but im still not healed right
 

undercover_girl

TRIBE Member
I've been having problems with my knee since January. It was diagnosed initially as meniscal irritation/tear by a sports doctor who directed me to see a physiotherapist for treatment. Off I went and then had my diagnosis revised to a Grade II MCL sprain (Tibial Collateral Ligament). After several weeks of physio, my knee wasn't getting any better. My new diagnosis is both an MCL sprain and meniscal tearing.

I now have to go back to the sports doctor. Maybe be scoped. Boo.

Anyhoo, my point is, you may want to see a sport's doctor first before going to physio. If you do decide to go this route, I recommend the Aches and Pains Clinic in First Canadian Place.

My physiotherapist just went on maternity leave :)( ) so I don't have a specific one to recommend, but check out the Canadian Physiotherapy Association or Ontario Physiotherapy Association websites: http://www.opa.on.ca/Find.html That's how I found my physiotherapist.
 

Mephisto

TRIBE Member
yikes, any idea how you tore it? i'm so paranoid about my knees. i've had friends who can't compete in triathlons anymore because of runner's knee and another who tore her cruciate. i wear neoprene knee supports when i snowboard with the cutouts to keep the patella aligned but i can definitely feel it the day after especially after sessions on the kickers at the park.

thanks for the suggestions. i'm going to get a proper checkout and referral from a sports doctor and go on the hunt. i think recommendations are super important for things like this, i've heard so many horror stories from friends who have gone through it and who have done their masters in physio and family about people who have gotten stuck with hack rmt/pt's and didn't made progress in their physio or who have done more damage than good and set them back even further.
tx again!
 

deep

TRIBE Member
Neoprene supports add minimal stabilization; this is backed by research. The value they add is in keeping the joint slightly warmer (improving lubrication and making the joint track easier), as well as the psychological belief that the knee is somehow more protected with the brace on. This can be a problem as the more external implements are used to support the knee, the less connective tissues have to do that themselves and the weaker the joint actually is against injury. Protecting the knee from injury is better served by strengthening all the surrounding muscles and connective tissues, and if a brace must be used to stabilize a past ligament tear, those beefy carbon fiber types are really the only ones strong enough to actually do something.
 

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
deep said:
Protecting the knee from injury is better served by strengthening all the surrounding muscles and connective tissues...
Squats!

Seriously... I had bad knee problems the first season I played Ultimate. By the end of the season, I could barely get through a game, and I didn't even play half the games in our final tournament, hobbling through the ones I did.

I spent the off-season doing lots of squats (dirty low squats where the bend in my knee is << 90 degrees), and the following season I was militant about warming up and stretching afterwards.

The results were that the entire following season I didn't once have problems despite playing harder and more frequently.

I had assumed that because I was experiencing knee pain, that I was screwed and there was nothing I could do about it (you hear about people with chronic knee pain and it sounds like a life sentence!)... but I was pleasantly surprised when I discovered that I could eliminate it entirely with strength training and proper stretching.
 
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deep

TRIBE Member
Yeah, I think people typically take joint problems as things they simply have to put up with, and don't see them as issues that can be improved significantly. And strength imbalances on either side of a joint are such a major contributors to joint injuries / problems. You can just spot the people who are begging for an injury, like when they're standing upright, if their leg curves forward due to their hamstrings being too weak.
 

Mephisto

TRIBE Member
all good to know!


but honestly suiting up in all my old man gear for snowboarding in the parking lot is one of my favourite parts of the whole undertaking. knee braces, pro-tec shorts (i have no shame about my padded diaper shorts. tailbone + rails = coccyx that never really forgives you no matter how many flowers you buy for it) burton gauntlets with the built-in wrist guards, powder skirt, goggles, balaclava and helmet. it's all about being a sweaty mess before you even get to the lift line after putting all your crap on and feeling like you're riding into a warzone going up the lift haha
 

Resolver

TRIBE Member
Mephisto said:
if anyone can point me to a sports clinic or licensed (for my paramedical coverage) physiotherapist that deals with this stuff it would make the world a better place for me :)

Try Humber Physiotherapy Services at 1436 Royal York Road. Tissa Wanniarachige has a B.Sc. (P.T.), M.C.P.A., C.A.F.C.I., D.O.M.T.P. He does physio as well as acupunctures and Osteopathy.
 

davehill79

TRIBE Promoter
Yup the best way is to strengthen the knee, but when i was on the road to recover after tearing my cartalidge (after my 3 ankle ops) when i was a rugby player, i found a number of exercises really aggrivated it. Whilst squats and hammy curls did the spot, any isolation of the quads, like the quad extensions would literally set me back about 3 weeks... I dont like doing them now.. they put too much pressure of your joints and ligaments.....

And YES goto see a sports doctor first or someone specialised in the field...
 

deep

TRIBE Member
Leg extensions are exceptionally bad for your knees from a kinetic chain standpoint and from the shearing forces they place through the knee joint. Yet because of their apparent "specificity" to knee extension, people instinctively think they need to do them to make their knees stronger, when in fact movements like squats are so much better for that purpose.
 
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Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
While we're on the subject... Am I covering all my bases in the legs if my workout consists of the following exercises?

- squats
- lunges
- hamstring curls
- calf extensions
 

deep

TRIBE Member
There's a lot more you can do that I think would help you in your athletic applications. Hip Abduction and adduction exercises would stabilize your cuts and lateral movements in ultimate, as well as make you stronger on the ground and in kicks for MMA. Training these muscles will also call into play muscles and connective tissues that help to stabilize the knee laterally. Hip flexor work would improve your running and kicks. I think you're already deadlifting but stiff legged deadlifts would add some more different hip extension work to your routine. One of the best exercises for the posterior chain (lower back, glutes, hamstrings) is something called a reverse hyperextension - the exercise was popularized by powerlifting guru Louie Simmons and there's a smoking hot broad demonstrating one way to do it here.
 

undercover_girl

TRIBE Member
Mephisto said:
yikes, any idea how you tore it?

Running. It's so hard on your body but I love it. My theory on how I hurt it is tri-fold: a) I had too many miles on my running shoes, b) the change in surface (I was running outside but for the couple months before that I had only been using the treadmill) and c) on my second last run I did do a quick cutover over a pipe at the Ex which hurt initially but I was able to continue running so I thought it was nothing. In hindsight, I think this is when the meniscal tearing happened. I haven't run since mid-January :( It's killing me seeing all those runners out and about enjoying all this perfect running weather we've been having...
 

deep

TRIBE Member
You might want to check out a book on running technique. Nost people are never trained how to run efficiently, they just do whatever comes "natural". But small aspects of form, multiplied by step after step, can have a significant aggregate effect on whether or not people get injured. The book Efficient Running by Jack Cady is a particularly good one, and cheap.
 

Mephisto

TRIBE Member
undercover_girl said:
Running....

ah crappy sorry to hear that. hopefully you can pull a lance armstrong and come back with avengence three times stronger with the ability to communicate with woodland animals
 
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KiX

TRIBE Member
sooo a torn acj?? that's umpossible, i'm guessing they meant a tear in one of your rotator cuff muscles? likely rehab will be a strengthening protocol for all ranges of GH motion, but you need a full assessment first.

as for the pain in your knees, deep subpatellar pain is usually indicative of patellafemoral pain syndrome, which means you'll likely need to neurologically retrain your VMO (vastus medialis obliquus...the teardrop-like muscle on the inside surface of your knee)) so that it contracts at the appropriate time. this will encourage proper patellar tracking with every step. assuming that's what's wrong, VMO retraining is your #1 concern. strengthening of the musculature around the knee is important to get to later, but may actually do more harm if the patellar tracking issue isn't sorted first. again, you need assessment to rule out other conditions.

i work at an injury rehab clinic at woodbine/danforth if you're looking for something east end. the physiotherapist/chiropractor i work with is the shit. (416)-694-APEX.
 

Mephisto

TRIBE Member
KiX said:
sooo a torn acj?? that's umpossible, i'm guessing they meant a tear in one of your rotator cuff muscles? likely rehab will be a strengthening protocol for all ranges of GH motion, but you need a full assessment first.

i injured my right shoulder rotator cuff about 6 years ago but i can't remember exactly what the problem was (from pitching). i had to do those exercises where you lie on your side and rotate your forearm ourwards keeping your elbow by your side. now i'm having a problem with my left shoulder ever since i landed on it after sketching out in the air of a kicker on the snowboard, i landed on sort of the back side of it (not with my arm extended or anything) and it's never been the same since. if i raise my arm out to my side, parallel to the ground i can't rotate my forearm higher than the shoulder without pain. she said she needed to do an adjustment to my shoulder that could help it but i'd have to be lying on my back. she said when she was prodding and poking she only went as far as the point of resistance but no further. she also talked about needed to strengthen some muscles in the front part of my shoulder (forget the muscles, not delts) under the scapula to build more stability and doing stretches like leaning forward in a doorframe with my arms in a sort of military press position. ok so the dancefloor at the drake probably wasn't the "ideal" venue for an initial assesment but being half in the bag it seemed like a fantastic idea at the time.

my wrists are also fucked up. nothing like learning about all the ways your body is falling apart just in time for your birthday wooo! "happy bday, here's a gift certificate for your neurological reprogramming"
 

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
deep said:
There's a lot more you can do that I think would help you in your athletic applications. Hip Abduction and adduction exercises would stabilize your cuts and lateral movements in ultimate, as well as make you stronger on the ground and in kicks for MMA.

I was actually doing these in the past but haven't had time to do them lately. For a while, I was actually only doing the adduction (or whichever one works the groin muscle) so that I could have a wicked strong guard in BJJ.

One of the best exercises for the posterior chain (lower back, glutes, hamstrings) is something called a reverse hyperextension - the exercise was popularized by powerlifting guru Louie Simmons and there's a smoking hot broad demonstrating one way to do it here.

Whoa! Borderline nfsw, but smoking hot indeed. :)
 

partypix

TRIBE Member
I agree with the advice to go see a Sports Med doctor first. They will be able to start you out in the right direction. So many injuries, tweaks, pains are linked together. If you are near the core I would recommend Aches and Pains Clinic at First Canadian Place.
I have had chronic knee and ankle pains, from hockey, soccer, biking, and alot from snowboarding. My shoulder has been messed since I tore it playing volleyball. Physio does help, but you have to keep up with your stretches and exercises, its not a one time fixer over nite. It does take some time to re-gain your movement and flexibilty.
If you are downtown I would recommend Adelaide West Physiotherapy = all the PTs there are also instructors/examiners and have all their levels. Very open group and really helpful in making you understand what the treatment is doing for you. Tell Kate Alex sent you. Plus the building is really kool as well.
http://physiotherapytoronto.com/
 
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