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top 40 deep house tracks of all time

octo

TRIBE Member
SPIN posted their top 40.

I'm not going to hate on the picks. They're all great tracks, but i'm sure most people could easily replace 20 of the tracks (if not 30).

I'm not gonna lie. I'm scared that deep house will get bastardized by EDM.

Blood (and Tears) on the Dance Floor
by SPIN Staff
Way back in the mid-1980s, when the disco gods appeared over the Chicago skyline and proclaimed, "Let there be house," his acolytes responded, "And let it be deep." And it was good.

Slower, moodier, and more sensual than most other club-music forms — heir to disco at its most mirrorball-blissful — deep house has survived for nearly three decades, staying mostly out of the spotlight, consigned to warm-up sets and after-hours reveries. But lately, it has bubbled back to the surface.

This month, the soulful sound scored a No. 1 hit on the U.K. pop charts with Storm Queen's "Look Right Through," a '90s-flavored song by Metro Area's Morgan Geist and busker extraordinaire Damon C. Scott that was first released on Geist's Environ label in 2010. It was a more recent remix from '90s deep-house mainstay MK (Marc Kinchen), and a summer's worth of heavy club play, that finally pushed it to the top slot, on the back of MK's recent success with remixes for Lana Del Rey, Sky Ferreira, and Disclosure.

"Look Right Through" wasn't a fluke. Duke Dumont's "Need U (100%)," another U.K. No. 1, has logged more than 17 million plays on YouTube; its plunging bass line and sub-aquatic keyboard stabs are direct descendants of Kerri Chandler's deep-diving take on New Jersey garage. Disclosure, the year's biggest dance-pop crossover success story, draw heavily from the deep-house playbook in their lanky grooves and woozy atmospheres. Behind them, there's a veritable groundswell of deep-house revivalists: Jamie Jones, Maya Jane Coles, Breach, Dixon and the Innervisions crew, Axel Boman, Hot Since 82 — even Bloc Party's Kele Okereke has plunged into the full-fathom sound.

In fact, 21 of Beatport's current Top 100 tracks are tagged as deep house. That doesn't make it the most popular genre on the site, but after big-room electro house, it's tied for second place with progressive house, and boasts a stronger chart presence than tech house (14 tracks), house (12), indie dance (four), and techno and trance (two apiece). Remember dubstep? That particular wub-genre doesn't have a single song in the Top 100.

A few years ago, that would have been unthinkable; deep house's moody pulses were drowned out in a cacophony of lasers and jackhammers and drops. But deep house's deliberately low profile is beginning to bear out the old meek-will-inherit-the-earth maxim.

Why now? In part, it's a reaction to the ubiquity of EDM at its most garish and bottle-serviced. Warm, moody, sometimes hesitant, and often melancholic, deep house is the antithesis of mainstream EDM's harder/faster/stronger ethos, that capitalist ego-topia fueled by cheap presets and dodgy Molly, hell-bent on success. Deep house is contradictory, wracked with doubt, so full of blue notes it bleeds indigo. It's pro-sadness on the dance floor; pro-pathos in the mix.

Ironically, the success of deep house as an alternative to big-tent EDM has helped it creep towards the mainstream. Pete Tong's "Essential New Tune" selections increasingly lean toward deep house breakout stars like Jamie Jones and Richy Ahmet, while the rest of his show favors crossover cornballs like Afrojack and Avicii; even trance grandmaster Tiësto now has a weekly deep house radio show on Sirius XM.

We'll be the first to admit that some of the attention has been misplaced. A lot of what gets flogged as deep house right now isn't really worthy of the name; it's mid-tempo, pop-dance fare with a 2-step twist, or it's snoozy, monotone background music tailor-made for SEO plays on YouTube channels emblazoned with soft-lit hipster cheesecake. In fact, "deep house" itself is a retrospective term; in their heyday, many of the first songs in the canon were simply considered "house," full stop. It was only later that a style assembled itself around the template those originators had set.

So what classifies as deep house today? Some basic guidelines: The four-to-the-floor pulse is imbued with a suggestive bit of shuffle and swing, with accents on the two and four. The grooves are more restrained than techno's, leaning back rather than barreling forward. The tempo generally runs between 118 and 125 beats per minute, although there are many outliers. More than anything, deep house is rich in harmony and atmosphere, buoyant as a jellyfish, bursting with lush textures and phosphorescent tones. Taking the definition of deep house at its most elastic, we've selected 40 songs that trace its evolution across 27 years, one inky chord at a time. PHILIP SHERBURNE

40. Steffi, "Sadness" (Ostgut Ton, 2011)
39. Faze Action, "In the Trees" (Nuphonic, 1996)
38. Tensnake, "In the End (I Want You to Cry)" (Running Back, 2009)
37. STL, "Silent State" (Smallville, 2009)
36. Fallout, "The Morning After (Sunrise Mix)" (Fourth Floor Records, 1987)
35. Axel Boman, "Purple Drank" (Pampa, 2010)
34. Omar-S, "Psychotic Photosynthesis" (FXHE, 2007)
33. Luomo, "Tessio" (Force Tracks, 2000)
32. The Other People Place, "Sorrow and a Cup of Joe" (Clone, 2002)
31. Kerri Chandler, Atmosphere EP (Shelter, 1993)
30. DJ Koze, "Cicely" (Philpot, 2007)
29. Justin Martin, "The Sad Piano (Charles Webster Remix)" (Buzzin' Fly, 2003)
28. Andrés, "New for U" (La Vida, 2012)
27. Roy Davis Jr. feat. Peven Everett, "Gabriel" (Large Records, 1996)
26. Dream 2 Science, "My Love Turns to Liquid" (Power Move, 1990)
25. Bobby Konders, "The Poem" (Nu Groove, 1990)
24. N.Y. House'n Authority, "Apt. 3A" (Nu Groove, 1989)
23. Ananda Project, "Cascades of Colour" (Nite Grooves, 1998)
22. Storm Queen, “Look Right Through” (Environ, 2010)
21. Gunnar Wendel, "578 (Omar S. Rude Boy Warm Mix)" (FXHE, 2010)
20. Robert Owens, “I’ll Be Your Friend” (RCA, 1991)
19. Iz & Diz, "Mouth (Brad Peep's Remix for Friends)" (Classic, 2002)
18. E.S.P., "It's You" (Underground, 1986)
17. Romanthony, "The Wanderer" (Black Male, 1993)
16. MK feat. Alana, "Love Changes (Deep Mix)" (Charisma, 1993)
15. Earth People, "Dance" (Kool Groove Records, 1989)
14. Chez Damier, "Untitled" (KMS, 1993)
13. Cajmere feat. Dajae, "Brighter Days" (Cajual, 1992)
12. Black Science Orchestra, "New Jersey Deep" (FFRR, 1994)
11. Frankie Knuckles Presents, "Your Love" (Trax, 1987)
10. Mr. Fingers, "Can You Feel It?" (Trax, 1986)
09. Saint Etienne, "Only Love Can Break Your Heart (Masters at Work Dub)" (Warner Brothers, 1991)
08. Theo Parrish, "I Can Take It" (Sound Signature, 2001)
07. Moodymann, "J.A.N." (KDJ, 2001)
06. Round Two, "New Day" (Main Street, 1995)
05. Crustation, "Flame (Mood II Swing Borderline Insanity Dub Mix)" (Jive, 1997)
04. Blaze, "Lovelee Dae" (Classic, 1997)
03. Joe Smooth Inc. featuring Anthony Thomas, "The Promised Land" (D.J. International, 1987)
02. Pepe Bradock, "Deep Burnt" (Kif, 1999)
01. Chez N Trent, "Morning Factory" (Prescription, 1994)
Keep on Deepin' On: The 40 Best Deep House Tracks of All Time | SPIN | Discover | SPIN Lists

thoughts?
 

le bricoleur

TRIBE Member
Nothing from Strictly Rhythm?

Nothing from Nervous?

No Little Louis?

Where's Romanthony's "Let Me Show You Love"?

Don't get me wrong. There's great stuff on that list but there are some serious omissions.

Also, why is Storm Queen's "Look Right Through" only breaking out now? It's three years old. (Albeit a great track).
 

LunaVC

TRIBE Member
love deep house especially this new garage/acid house/detroit inspired stuff from Disclosure Duke Dumont and the likes

Depends where you want to draw the line, I mean Raze Break 4 Love is what I would call deep house but some people may have it other things. What about Dionne Come Get My Lovin is a pretty deep track and a lot of the stuff nowadays with the wood chopper hi hats and everything sounds a like that era
 

LunaVC

TRIBE Member
Nothing from Strictly Rhythm?

Nothing from Nervous?

No Little Louis?

Where's Romanthony's "Let Me Show You Love"?

Don't get me wrong. There's great stuff on that list but there are some serious omissions.

Also, why is Storm Queen's "Look Right Through" only breaking out now? It's three years old. (Albeit a great track).
I'd say Nervous and Lil Louie are more garage and jazz/funky house

I hate all the names though, just drop whatever works into a set.

THat Jazzanova tune what got remixed by Cajmere I think is getting played a lot too.
 

LunaVC

TRIBE Member
if you look at the label on the record for things like FCL Let's Go it says in the credits 'Recorded in a very amteurish "that's what house is all about" - way @ studio 55'


and that pretty much sums up why Dubstep and DnB are shockingly bad and why deep house is huge now and will be for years to come. Nobody wants auto tune vocals and melodrmatic chrosuses. People just want dirty house that isn't having the kitchen sink thrown at it like DnB and Dubstep. Sometime the best music can be so simple. Hardcore suffered because of the over production but at least it had a cool sound to it.

Love live deep house, I don't think dubstep and DnB will ever be big in the UK ever again especially now you have country and western singers making dnb and dubstep tracks.

Terrible
 
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