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This is awful! :(

Skipper

TRIBE Member
:(


Tragic end to 70-year marriage

Nursing home transfer split couple
Wife, then husband, die within days
Mar. 3, 2006. 08:38 AM
DIRK MEISSNER
CANADIAN PRESS


VICTORIA - Al and Fanny Albo were married for almost 70 years, and when they both were admitted to hospital in rural B.C. last month for different medical conditions they nevertheless expected to remain together.

Instead, Fanny, 91, was forcibly removed from her 96-year-old husband in a Trail hospital and shipped more than 100 kilometres along a winding mountain road to a long-term care facility where she died 48 hours later , on Feb. 19.

Yesterday, the Albo family confirmed Al's death, less than two weeks after government bungling led to their last parting.

B.C. Health Minister George Abbott, who cancelled plans for a European trip to deal with the fallout from Fanny's death, yesterday expressed his condolences in the legislature.

"I know this is again a very, very difficult new chapter of their lives that they'll be entering," he said, referring to the Albos' relatives.

"I know (the Albo) qualities of patience, understanding and courage will serve them well as they move forward with their lives."

A government inquiry into Fanny's death yesterday blamed bureaucratic errors and medical misjudgment for the decision to move the frail 91-year-old, needlessly separating her from her husband.

Abbott said he called the family to "apologize unreservedly."

But family members are still upset at the way the two were parted.

Son Jim Albo said after his mother's death that, at the parting, she was rolled into her husband's room and told by staff, who got her name wrong in the process, "Say goodbye to your husband, Mary."


Daughter-in-law Carole Albo said the family is now mourning the loss of two beloved family members, and that they appreciate "everything everybody's done over the last few days," she said.

"It's going to have to hold for a little while now."

Outside the legislature, Abbott said he called the family shortly after hearing of Al's death and told them he and the ministry were there to help if they needed any.

"I feel a great deal of sympathy and empathy for the family," he said.

"It is a very difficult time for people in their lives when they lose a parent.

`` For the Albo family to have to go through what I think was an unfortunate last few days with Fanny Albo was something that I feel very bad about."

The health ministry report said Fanny was a candidate for palliative care, but local health officials chose to move her to Grand Forks without considering placing her in the community's single palliative bed.

Debra McPherson, president of the nurses' union, said government health policies are leading to early death and that the province "has moved into active euthanasia."

"If the health authority just wants to not the spend money on care of seniors, than why don't they just be honest about it, rather than send them to an early death?" she questioned.

Abbott called these comments "irresponsible."
 
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Skipper

TRIBE Member
Old people are so delicate and attached to one another...this made me think about my grandparents. :(
 

Crazlegs

TRIBE Member
That is so tragic! Poor things had to spend their final days alone. If I were the family I'd be getting myself a very good lawyer. :(
 
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grounded4life

TRIBE Member
Usually in geriatric cases from what I have seen, a lot of married couples such as in this case bcome co-dependant, even if they don't want to be and often when separated they die within a very short period of time.
 

AdRiaN

TRIBE Member
Debra McPherson, president of the nurses' union, said government health policies are leading to early death and that the province "has moved into active euthanasia."

"If the health authority just wants to not the spend money on care of seniors, than why don't they just be honest about it, rather than send them to an early death?" she questioned.
Wow, these union types never miss a beat.
 

rhyss

TRIBE Member
Skipper said:
Old people are so delicate and attached to one another...this made me think about my grandparents. :(
It happened to my grandparents too. They lived together for 50+ years and then his alzheimer's got so bad that he had to be hospitalized. It broke my gramma's heart not being with him everyday. After a while, he didn't know she was his wife (he thought she was his girlfriend). She passed on a within a year. He a year after her.
 

R4V4G3D_SKU11S

TRIBE Member
AdRiaN said:
Wow, these union types never miss a beat.
Agreed. She has a valid point but I don't think it was the time or the place to be bringing that up in public.

The article is pretty weakly written. It isn't really all that clear on why/how she was forcibly moved? I also love how they have to add that it was a "winding mountain road".

The family would have had the final say in sending her to the nursing home, so it'll be interesting to see what the inquiry digs up. It might surprise alot of people.
 
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