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the York U murder

kerouacdude

TRIBE Member
^^^
yeah, I had to look it up myself and apparently that's not the way it works in Canada. If you commit or intend to commit sexual assault and the person is killed, it's 1st degree, full stop. Intent to kill is irrelevant.
 

Bass-Invader

TRIBE Member
^^^
yeah, I had to look it up myself and apparently that's not the way it works in Canada. If you commit or intend to commit sexual assault and the person is killed, it's 1st degree, full stop. Intent to kill is irrelevant.
Actually you're right. I didn't think they would differ in requiring intent for 1st degree.

Murder in commission of offences
Criminal Code
230. Culpable homicide is murder where a person causes the death of a human being while committing ... sexual assault ... whether or not the person means to cause death to any human being and whether or not he knows that death is likely to be caused to any human being, if
(a) he means to cause bodily harm for the purpose of
(i) facilitating the commission of the offence, or
(ii) facilitating his flight after committing or attempting to commit the offence,
and the death ensues from the bodily harm;


That means the lawyer must've been contesting the boldfaced part (230a) - basically that:
- the defendant admits sexual assault;
- the defendant admits the fact that death resulted;
- the defendant submits that he didn't intend to cause the bodily harm (it was an accident.)

Still sort of an intention based thing, it just attaches to bodily harm instead of death. I guess the evidence in favour of Dickinson having committed the sexual assault must have been lock tight. That would leave this as the lawyer's only real runnable argument... I suppose evidence that strong + mandatory life sentence meant that there probably wasn't much on offer for a guilty plea (or Dickinson simply refused to admit guilt) so the lawyer was stuck having to run some kind of defence.
 

The Kid

TRIBE Member
Ugh, what a disgusting human being. I wish I hadn't watched that video when I was baked last night...so creepy.
 

rentboy

TRIBE Member
That post from Coleridge gave me chills.

I ran into Brian quite a few times in the early 2000s and always found that there was something off about him.

Did anyone on here know him well?
 

R4V4G3D_SKU11S

TRIBE Member
Detective recounts catching Webcam Killer | Toronto & GTA | News | Toronto Sun

TORONTO - In a tiny neighbourhood bar on Gerrard St. E. in April 2011 it occurred to the “webcam killer” his days of freedom were numbered.

“Have you ever been to jail?” Brian Dickson asked a patron on the next stool at My Bar at 936 Gerrard, just east of Carlaw Ave. “I am going to jail for life.”

The hair on the back of the man’s neck stood up.

It was strange bar talk but Det.-Sgt. Frank Skubic, a veteran of Toronto Police’s homicide squad, knew what it meant.

Dickson was spooked.

“We were interviewing him just before that,” Skubic said following Dickson’s conviction last Monday. “We had him in for three and a half hours.”

And while Dickson, 32, had come to the conclusion investigators were on to him, police had already come to the conclusion he was Qian “Necole” Liu’s killer.

They now just had to prove it.

Attacked and sexually assaulted in her basement room, the 23-year-old York University student had been dead just four days.

But it had been a long two days for Skubic since Dickson first appeared on his radar. He was the only person who was rooming in the residence near York University who was “unaccounted for” since the April 15 murder.

They tracked down his parent’s phone number.

“He was cordial on the telephone and agreed to come in for an interview,” Skubic recalled. “He wanted to help.”

In the meantime, police had worked up a profile, which included past allegations against Dickson of violence on women and a disturbing Internet presence in which he advocated incest, underage sex and recruiting 12-year-olds for pornography.

And police were also talking with another man who had dated the victim. They were working on a limited description that was provided by a former boyfriend in China, to whom Liu was speaking with on her computer when she was attacked.

The focus was on Dickson — a quirky character who had modelling pictures of himself online and who was still living among university students, despite no longer studying.

“I showed him a picture of her,” said Skubic, a veteran of more than 100 homicide cases. “He picked it up and looked at it sideways. I could see on his face the emotional connection he had to her.”

Although Dickson was “emphatic” he wasn’t involved, Skubic said that by the time the interview had wrapped up, “I knew he was my guy.”

Then came the hardest part for any detective.

“Having a gut feeling and proving it are two different things,” said Skubic. “We did not have enough evidence to hold him and we had to make the difficult decision to let him leave.”

Dickson was free — but he was not alone.

“I was confident our surveillance team would not lose sight of him and they did not,” Skubic said.

From Toronto Police headquarters on College St., Dickson walked straight to My Bar while Skubic waited for a call for the Centre for Forensic Sciences.

There were many officers hard at work on this. Skubic’s team had collected two cigarette butts the day before left behind by Dickson, plus he had voluntarily offered DNA samples in his meeting with them.

“In my opinion he was brazen,” said Skubic. “I think he was confident he had cleaned up the scene.”

The phone rang with news that he shouldn’t have been so cocky. The Centre for Forensic Sciences had made a preliminary DNA match with semen found on Liu’s body at the time of her murder.

It was time to make the arrest and they followed Dickson to a friend’s home in North York.

No one was more relieved than Skubic.

“I didn’t like leaving him out there,” he said. “He is a predator.”

This was one of the first cases where the Toronto Police homicide squad had gone to the “cluster” approach to investigating murder. Led by Insp. Ed Boyd, the group also consisted of Det.-Sgts. Brian Borg, and Dan Neilsen, Dets. Tam Bui, and Les Dunkley, Sgts. Todd Carefoot and Shawn Meaney, as well as Consts. Paul Soucy, Craig Brister, Chris Armstrong and John Welsh.

All of them played a role in putting away a dangerous person who killed a young person and her dream.

Liu arrived in Toronto with big plans and great hopes of family and friends back in China.

“We have never lost sight that Qian Liu is the most important person in this,” Skubic said.

He also credits the Centre for Forensic Sciences who “turned it around quickly” and “understood the urgency of it.”

Even though they had Dickson in custody, police still had to deal with an upsetting phase of any murder case — informing the grief-stricken family.

“I have spent a lot of time with her parents and they are amazing people,” said Skubic. “Our hearts go out to them.”

Dickson had offered to plead guilty to the less-serious charge of manslaughter before the start of his trial last month but the Crown wouldn’t go for it. Their case for murder was too strong.

And, just shy of the third anniversary of Liu’s death, a jury found Brian Dickson guilty of first-degree murder last Monday, a conviction that carries an automatic life sentence with no possibility for parole for 25 years.

“I guess he called it,” Skubic said, harkening back to Dickson’s barstool prophecy three years earlier.
 

ndrwrld

TRIBE Member
True Detective, with Dexter all over it.
Again...this guy floated thru the scene, lots of police involvement, and he was let go, to do this ?
 

The Truth

TRIBE Member
Millions of people use online dating websites every year to try to find love. But one dating web site we found has victims advocates and psychologists outraged. It’s called “Canadian Inmates Connect” — and it features, violent criminals — including convicted murderers — looking for love.

His online dating profile says I’m a 32-year old tall, fit single white male seeking exciting, adventurous, attractive female pen pal. He goes on to describe himself as a loving, kind, gentle and caring person who is stuck in a terrible and precarious situation. His name is Brian Dickson and above that profile it says convicted of first degree murder.

That’s right, he’s a convicted murderer looking for love on a website called Canadian Inmates Connect.
http://www.chch.com/dating-inmates-online/
 

rentboy

TRIBE Member
It's weird the amount of women that are into convicted/incarcerated men.

Some of the most notorious convicts receive letters from women seeking a relationship.
 

SneakyPete

TRIBE Member
His online dating profile says I’m a 32-year old tall, fit single white male seeking exciting, adventurous, attractive female pen pal. He goes on to describe himself as a loving, kind, gentle and caring person who is stuck in a terrible and precarious situation. His name is Brian Dickson and above that profile it says convicted of first degree murder.

That’s right, he’s a convicted murderer looking for love on a website called Canadian Inmates Connect.
Maybe they will setup a webcam date.
 

Klubmasta Will

TRIBE Member
does he get to use the internet sometimes? otherwise, how would he have posted that? did his friend post it for him?

who on this board was friends with him?
 

SneakyPete

TRIBE Member
Last profile on the page. Not sure if it's a joke.


INSTITUTION: PACIFIC PENIENTIARY

ADDRESS: P.O. BOX 3100
ABBOTSFORD, BRITISH COLUMBIA
V2S 4P4

D.O.B: DECEMBER 18, 1948​​​​​​​​CONVICTED OF: MURDER
EXPECTED RELEASE DATE: UNKNOWN
INTERESTED IN: WOMEN

​​I want tu meet peepl hu r inturrestd in witch craft (olso noan as Nature Worship). I wuud like tu correspond and b vizutd bi peepl hu R inturrestd or eevn just curious. I du not want peepl hu: A) Think thay no it ol B) R pretentious and overbearing C) Want tu B aibl tu trn peepl intu frogz D) Think thay kan bkum powrfl bi dooing eevl. Tu inny wun hu thingkz that I hav nuthing tu ofr but insens, kandlz and tarot kardz: I stait th folloing: Thair R minny supposedly learned peepl (hu I dskribe as pseudo-intellectual haf-witz) hu dunowns az superstitious nonsense thingz (such az biorhythmz) which hav bin knkloosvly established az fakt. (for biorhythmz and a numbr uv uthrz, kunsult the Encycloperdia Britanicca; this haz bin wun uv mi moast reliable sources of information.)
 

R4V4G3D_SKU11S

TRIBE Member
A few above djsnakethesnake is Jeff Tuck, who is the guy convicted of 2nd degree murder in the Hullabaloo murder at the Docks.

Worlds. Colliding.
 

R4V4G3D_SKU11S

TRIBE Member
Last profile on the page. Not sure if it's a joke.
R. v. Gillese, 1993 898 (BC CA)

The accused was described by one of the other tenants, aptly, I believe, as an eccentric. He was a compulsive collector of containers; juice cartons in particular, but also glass jars, styrofoam hamburger boxes, newspapers, and even empty toothpaste tubes. On cross-examination, he had no real explanation for that conduct, simply stating that he collected stuff because you never know when it may be handy.
The accused has been unemployed and on social assistance for some years. He likes to design and build things, not for a living, but because he feels compelled to, like Alexander Graham Bell. He says that while in custody awaiting his trial on this charge, he was working on an inexpensive navigation system for the blind. Hoarding things, an expression used by the accused himself, is a better description for his mania than collecting. After this shooting, seven truckloads of material were removed from the attic and his small suite.
 
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