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The Official Stanley Kubrick Thread

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The Tesseract

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by el presidente Highsteppa
as probably would have been the case for A.I. if he had still been involved.

Spielberg did A.I. exactly the way Kubrick wanted to do it. (it was kubricks script after all)

However, Neither Kubrick Nor Spielberg stayed true to Brian Aldiss's work, which was much simpler, and had the father getting fired, and finds David abandoned by his wife (who leaves him) and telling David that everything is going to be fine.
None of that real-live brother, super-city, return to the creator crap.
 

wakipaki

TRIBE Member
Love Kuprick, tell me what titles I'm missing so I can see them immediately, I've seen:
Dr. Strangelove
Lolita
Bary Lydon
The Killing
Sparticus
The Shining
Clockwork Orange
2001 : A space....
Full Metal Jacket
AI
Eyes Wide Shut

My personal favourite = Full Metal Jacket, nothing beets it, except maybe Clockwork, too me Dr. Strangelove, Lolita and The Killing represent Kupbrick at an underdeveloped stage in his carreer, they leave me longing for more
 

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by BigBadBaldy
..and let's not even get *INTO* the amazing performances he was able to pull out of actors!!!

GAH!!!


YES - his berating and terrorizing Shelley Duvall on the set of the Shining (in the documentary) gives a good indication of how he was an effective director!
 

JESuX

TRIBE Member
what amazes me about kubrick is his ability to deliver quintessential genre pieces, he has crafted seminal pictures in sci-fi, horror, war, action, epic and period genres and that above all else signals a diverse and legendary director.

he is imho the most important director of the 20th century.
 
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Originally posted by DSV
I liked Barry Lyndon. It had a nice ironic tone pervading the whole thing. And I thought the cinematography was quite pleasurable. Also, the themes that he plays with, the way he gets your mind working is brilliant. And that final duel was amazing, so much tension!


See I found the acting to be pretty flat and I honestly believe in Ryan O'Neill's bitching that his best work in that film was left on the floor. You're right about the set ups that he had for when action started to come together, the duel being the highlight of course.


As for Eyes Wide Shut, my understanding is that it was finished and Kubrick was happy with it; but that he didn't get a chance to screen it, and he was known for making small adjustments after showing the film a few times. I liked that movie as well. The very end may have been a bit anti-climactic, but the whole last act of that movie is classic Kubrick. The pacing, the camera work, it all seems to stimulate pleasure centers in my brain that no other director seems to pull off.

That's where I have a problem with the claim that it was fininshed. No-one said it was finished until after Kubrick passed away, and I think it was because the studio (Warner Brothers) knew that they wouldn't be able to get a stand in director to finish the film, since the screenplay was constantly being re-written on the fly (which is pretty standard for Kubrick films, and a pretty incredible acheivement for any director, as that usually indicates serious scripting problems). I mean there's no actual record that he himself said it was finished, and Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman weren't working on anything because of Kubrick's contract demanding that they be available for reshoots at any time until the film was finished. Remember that Kubrick spent well over 3 years making this film, throwing out huge chunks of footage and reshooting them over and over again, re-scoring the film something like 7 times (I could be wrong at the amount of times he rescored it, but I do have an Entertainment Weekly blurb that mentionned that Mr. Metalheadz himself Goldie was going to do the soundtrack for Eyes Wide Shut at one point. Honestly, it was always the footage of Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise going on record saying it was finished (which I don't think it was) and they never had anything from Kubrick himself (remember that this is the guy that recut The Shining a week after it was in theatres). Finished? I don't buy it. I believe it was in the final stages, but it still felt like it needed another draft in the editing room and a couple of more reshoots.
 
Originally posted by The Tesseract
Spielberg did A.I. exactly the way Kubrick wanted to do it. (it was kubricks script after all)

However, Neither Kubrick Nor Spielberg stayed true to Brian Aldiss's work, which was much simpler, and had the father getting fired, and finds David abandoned by his wife (who leaves him) and telling David that everything is going to be fine.
None of that real-live brother, super-city, return to the creator crap.

Speilberg stated that he stuck to the storyboards, but I think the script was tinkered with (I have a hard time believing the "alternate blue fairy ending" would have been something done by Kubrick, the film itself is so cold up until that final recovery sequence, where it all went to mush and out of character for a Kubrick film).
 

terrawrist III

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by JESuX
what amazes me about kubrick is his ability to deliver quintessential genre pieces, he has crafted seminal pictures in sci-fi, horror, war, action, epic and period genres and that above all else signals a diverse and legendary director.

he is imho the most important director of the 20th century.

OH man...them's big words! :D ...I would go out on a limb and say Kurosawa is...but Kunrick being not far behind...of course the body of work speaks for itself
 

DSV

TRIBE Promoter
Originally posted by terrawrist III
I would go out on a limb and say Kurosawa is...but Kunrick being not far behind...of course the body of work speaks for itself

Who's Kurosawa? What movies has he done. If he's as awesome as Kubrick, I gotta' know!!!
 
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chipotle

Well-Known TRIBEr
You have to watch:

Ran
Seven Samurai
Red Beard

Oh man... Kurasawa was a very good director.
He has tons of movies.

But I am not film buff..
 

terrawrist III

TRIBE Member
Sugata Sanshiro, 1943

The Most Beautiful
(Ichiban Utsukusiku), 1944

Zoku Sugata Sanshiro, 1945

They Who Step On The Tiger's Tail (Tora no O wo Fumu Otokotachi), 1945, released 1952

No Regrets For The Youth (Waga Seisyun ni Kui Nashi), 1946

Asu wo Tsukuru Hitobito, 1946

One Wonderful Sunday (Subarashiki Nichiyoubi), 1947

Drunken Angel (Yoidore Tenshi), 1949

The Quiet Dual (Shizukanaru Ketto), 1949

Stray Dog (Nora Inu), 1949

Scandel (Shubun), 1950

Rashomon, 1950

The Idiot (Hakuchi), 1951

Ikiru, 1952

Seven Samurai (Shichinin no Samurai), 1954

Record of Living Being (Ikimono no Kiroku), 1956

The Throne of Blood (Kumonosu-Jo), 1957

The Lower Depth (Donzoko), 1957

The Hidden Fortress (Kakushi Toride no San-Akunin), 1958
The Bad Sleep Well
(Warui Yatsu Hodo Yoku Nemuru), 1960

Yojimo, 1961

Tsubaki Sanjuro,
1962

High and Low
(Tengoku to Jigoku),
1963

Red Beard (Akahige),
1965

Dodes'ka-den, 1970

Dersu Uzala, 1974

Kagemusha, 1980

Ran, 1985

Akira Kurosawa's Dreams,
1990

Rhapsody in August,
1991

Madadayo, 1993

influenced countless directors in terms of style and camera angles etc...ALSO inspiration for lucas' star wars(rashomon)...he also IMO has the greatest sequences using rain as the primary backdrop
 
Akira Kurosawa lay the groundwork for most of modern cinema today.

The Seven Samurai was the basis for the Magnificent Seven, Yojimbo and Sanjuro were the basis for For A Fistful of Dollars and For a Few Dollars More, Rashomon has been remade countless times with the theme of one event with several different ponts of view. Throne of Blood was his reinterpretation of Shakespear's MacBeth, while Ran is a reinterpretation of Shakespear's King Lear. He did most of his groundbreaking work before the 1950's, when American cinema was just starting to find it's feet.

His camera work and vision are on par with Orson Wells, and his ideas were revolutionary for their time, and still leaders today.

DSV, by all means, see Kurosawa's films, he's one of the best and my all time favorites.
 

BigBadBaldy

TRIBE Member
Sure, Kurosawa's themes were plagarised more than any other modern director, but I still think Kubrick is far and away a much more revolutionary filmmaker. I think Kubrick took his medium to the accepted limits and then rewrote the boundaries, in every aspect of the way he tackled a film from idea to screening.
 
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leigh

TRIBE Promoter
Originally posted by el presidente Highsteppa

Finished? I don't buy it.

even if it wasn't finished, it still is probably one of the smartest and most groundbreaking films i've seen. i loved it. i loved the way it was marketed. and i loved how 90% of the people who came out of it were annoyed because it wasn't what they thought it was going to be... such a good film.
 

Lysistrata

Well-Known TRIBEr
The ending of AI was NOT NOT NOT NOT Kubrick.

I'm happy to see you guys (specifically those of you with film knowledge and tastes I particularly respect) appreciate Eyes Wide Shut. While I was bored with Barry Lyndon (I respect a lot of the film making in it, but ooo, it was a snoozer) I found Eyes Wide Shut fascinating. I know the word psychological can be overused, especially in this dicsussion, but it was. It was psychological, and I think that a lot of people didn't 'get' it because of this modern north western focus on plot we have--we need things to happen. We need for things to happen and for them to have a clear cause and effect relationship for us to follow a narrative, and Eyes Wide Shut did away with that sort of convention.

However, it's far from my fave (see Pres' commentary for reasons.) I love the Peter Sellers Kubrick movies hte most, and then the horrors/sci fis. (AI does not count as a Kubrick Sci Fi.)
 

SENSEi

TRIBE Promoter
Originally posted by DJ TRO
I'm acctually reading clockwork orenge right now

it's a really strange book...the language is tough at times..it's like russian slang:p

-Bill

Do you have the version with the glossary in the back?
That makes it easier the first time.

There was me.
That is Alex.
And my 3 Droogs.
That is Pete, Georgie and Dim, Dim be very dim.
And we sat around the Korova Milk bar trying to make up our razdocks what to do with the evening.

The Korova milk bar sold Milk Plus.
Milk plus synthemen or drencrum, which is what we was having.
 

windowlicker

TRIBE Member
re: kubrick

his later more flashy films get all the attention but his earlier stuff (paths of glory, etc) are equally, if not more impressive

the supposedly innovative and groundbreaking film reservoir dogs is a blatant rip off of kubrick's 'the killing' (which is worth checking out, btw)- tarantino cites early kubrick as one of his biggest influences
 

terrawrist III

TRIBE Member
Re: re: kubrick

Originally posted by windowlicker
his later more flashy films get all the attention but his earlier stuff (paths of glory, etc) are equally, if not more impressive

the supposedly innovative and groundbreaking film reservoir dogs is a blatant rip off of kubrick's 'the killing' (which is worth checking out, btw)- tarantino cites early kubrick as one of his biggest influences

don't EVER say that...it's called an HOMAGE...you and me both know Tarantino loves this shit TOO much to blatently paraphrase a peice of film like that!...just like KIll BIll had elements of MANY genres and styes...just a tribute really...plus the use of laurence teirney added to that ;)
 
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windowlicker

TRIBE Member
Re: Re: re: kubrick

Originally posted by terrawrist III
don't EVER say that...it's called an HOMAGE...you and me both know Tarantino loves this shit TOO much to blatently paraphrase a peice of film like that!...just like KIll BIll had elements of MANY genres and styes...just a tribute really...plus the use of laurence teirney added to that ;)

don't get me wrong I like tarantino (and reservoir dogs is one of my favourite films) but it does bear too many similarities to 'the killing' to just be classified as paying homage- even the plot was the same
 
Re: re: kubrick

Originally posted by windowlicker
the supposedly innovative and groundbreaking film reservoir dogs is a blatant rip off of kubrick's 'the killing' (which is worth checking out, btw)- tarantino cites early kubrick as one of his biggest influences

Actually it's a blatant rip off of a Ringo Lam action/drama with Chow Yun Fat and Danny Lee, called City On Fire, which even has the mexican standoff with loyalties being challenged and the hero's cover being blown. It also features a Diamond robbery gone wrong (partly because of a psychopath amoungst the group) as well as a ton of other similarities. I really didn't see much of a reference to The Killing as much as I did see him taking a lot from Ringo Lam's Hong Kong thriller.
 

terrawrist III

TRIBE Member
Re: Re: Re: re: kubrick

Originally posted by windowlicker
don't get me wrong I like tarantino (and reservoir dogs is one of my favourite films) but it does bear too many similarities to 'the killing' to just be classified as paying homage- even the plot was the same

I was paying too much attention to the brilliant dialogue to worry I guess ;)

BTW one of my fav's too:D
 

Hal-9000

TRIBE Member
heehe

Kubrick ripped somebody else off with 'The Killing'. The tracking shots in 'Paths Of Glory', which were later to become something of his trademrk, were ripped-off Max Ophul's. That spooky two-shot of the twins in 'The Shining'? Direct rip-off of a Dianne Arbus still..

more later
 

terrawrist III

TRIBE Member
Re: Re: re: kubrick

Originally posted by el presidente Highsteppa
Actually it's a blatant rip off of a Ringo Lam action/drama with Chow Yun Fat and Danny Lee, called City On Fire, which even has the mexican standoff with loyalties being challenged and the hero's cover being blown. It also features a Diamond robbery gone wrong (partly because of a psychopath amoungst the group) as well as a ton of other similarities. I really didn't see much of a reference to The Killing as much as I did see him taking a lot from Ringo Lam's Hong Kong thriller.

note to self(in norm mcdonald voice):GET CITY ON FIRE!

:cool:
 
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