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The final season of BREAKING BAD

kuba

TRIBE Member
Todd get's rejected by Lydia, goes nuts and kills her.

Heads back to the compound pretty heated.......and Walt shows up with the gun. Walt shoots everyone, frees Jessie, and then...after telling Jessie how he is the only family he has left, takes the Ricin. Walt dies.

Jessie takes the money, with no one to pin any crimes on him, he takes the little boy of the murdered mother, and raises him.

fade to black.

thank you very much.
zero chance of walt taking ricin, he's going own swinging, he aint a selfish prick to kill himself, he loves who he has become too much to not want to see the end of a gun, vs a pill

good thing you're not a writer on the show ;)
 
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SneakyPete

TRIBE Member
zero chance of walt taking ricin, he's going own swinging, he aint a selfish prick to kill himself, he loves who he has become too much to not want to see the end of a gun, vs a pill

good thing you're not a writer on the show ;)
I wouldn't rule that out but if it does happen I don't think it's going to play out like mrs pink described.
 

Maui

TRIBE Member
Yes, I didn't like the character since the very first episode.
Exactly.

This has nothing to do with Walt, or anybody or anything. It's just her personality and character. SHE IS A WHINY BITCH.

Yes you could say Walt is a bad person, although that is arguable depending on your stance on drugs. Sure he killed some people, but all criminals involved in the business and getting killed in a known possibility that comes with the territory and anyone who decides to join that business knows this.

Besides Skylar decided to go along with Walt so she is just as bad. Period. But she still continued to whine about it along the way. She also ordered the hit on one of their own team not even knowing the details of what was going on.
She's raised a whiny kid no less, my gosh when Walt was offering him the hundred grand... And Jessie, no sympathy whatsoever. He committed the number one foul you just don't do in life. Ever.

But he has suffered enough and I'd like to see Walt maybe save him.
 

Lojack

TRIBE Member
It's going to end in tears. The creator Vince Gilligan basically said so, commenting that writing the ending brought him to tears. Couple that with his previous comments about pitching the series as Mr Chips meets Scarface, well, it's pretty obvious.

My own predictions? He'll poison Lydia (gotta have that Splenda in her coffee/tea yo), as she's a threat to the family. He'll try to take out Uncle Jack, Todd and their crew, in order to rescue Jesse. May succeed in that, but he won't live much longer anyway.

-- L
 

Maui

TRIBE Member
Does nobody think he's going to try to poison those his ex business partners?

They are the ones who ruined his whole life, that's who I'd be after.

I think Skylar is going to die. Let us pray now. :D
 

ndrwrld

TRIBE Member
the Stantons are still in Toronto and just FB'd they need a big screen, beer and popcorn to watch the finale.
just invited them to Hamilton to my place...they said yes.
to be continued...
 
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Maui

TRIBE Member
Yahoo News Canada - Latest News & Headlines


One day from now, at approximately 10:15 p.m., the internet will explode. That’s because it will be seconds after the credits roll on the final episode of AMC’s Breaking Bad, and everyone—no matter what the ending—will have something very important to say.
Will Walter White—the high school science teacher turned murderous meth kingpin—receive his moral comeuppance, or will he walk off into the New Mexico sunset? Will his scorned business partner Jesse finally see vengeance, or will he die at the hands of Walt’s new neo-Nazi buddies? Will Walter Jr. enjoy another delicious breakfast at the White household, or will he be doomed to walk the earth, Kwai Chang Caine style, forever searching for a satisfactory pancake? Whatever happens, it won’t make a difference, not really: for the millions watching at home and then immediately commenting online, there will be no entirely satisfactory conclusion.
Who can we blame for such a mess? Well, me, for starters, and the army of television recappers and commentators who make their livelihood dissecting creativity. In this era of highly scrutinized viewing—where every drama sparks a million words online, and at least twice as many GIFs—it’s become impossible for showrunners to stick the landing, to please each and every fan. Not when audiences blog, tweet, Tumbl and screen-capture episodes for posterity, each eager to be the first to slam or praise. And not when critics can expend thousands of words detailing why, exactly, an episode didn’t live up to the massive expectations they set for it, week after week, year after year.
It didn’t use to be this way. Only a decade ago, things were different—not better, necessarily, just different. Sunday nights, for instance, were far less stressful than they are now, for viewer and critic alike. When a TV drama reached its natural end—when all plots and/or contract negotiations had been explored—it received a few highly placed eulogies from the top newspapers and magazines, maybe 800 words a pop, and we all moved on. Sure, some of the more divisive finales—the fantastical St. Elsewhere bait-and-switch, the moral comeuppance of Seinfeld—sparked mild grumbling, but those who were still talking about it a week later were dismissed as water-cooler cranks. What else, everyone wondered, was on next?

Then, Television Without Pity picked up steam in the early aughts, and TV recaps—irresistible mini-essays coated in snark and layered with an oft-profound/disturbing level of attention to detail—became essential post-TV reading, a sort of syllabus for understanding, for truly experiencing, your favourite program. It became socially acceptable to obsess.
Flash forward a few years, and the landscape is now awash with TV recappers, small armies of quick typists and even quicker wits spilling words about what they—and you, yes you!—just experienced not an hour ago. On Sunday nights, after the prestige cable dramas typically air, the web can resemble a spoiler-fuelled traffic jam, with arguments rear-ending each other at a furious clip.
With this rise in quick-to-criticize TV recappers—from the hyper-detailed musings of The AV Club‘s Todd VanDerWerff to the bratty wit of Grantland‘s Andy Greenwald to the wise grandfatherly sage of them all, Alan Sepinwall—comes an inevitable sense of disappointment. The more columns you read (hell, even The New Republic is now in the game) and the more a show is dissected, the easier it is to detect flaws, to find imperfection. To be disappointed.
This isn’t to say such criticism is bad or unwanted—it’s impossible to tally how many excellent points have been made by Sepinwall and his ilk—it’s just hard to deny how the movement has changed the modern television landscape. It’s gotten to the point that no one showrunner could possibly secure each and every columnist’s wholesale seal of approval, to deliver so perfect a product that recappers will just set aside their keyboards after typing, “Yep, perfect. Nothing more to say here.” Everyone wants to be a unique voice, a contrarian.
As Breaking Bad nears its end Sept. 29, let’s all take a moment to think of series mastermind Vince Gilligan. No matter what he chooses to do—no matter which direction he throws Walt—he will never live up to our expectations, and we’ll make our disappointment known right here, online, where it will echo for weeks and years.
It will be the same problem Matthew Weiner faces in 2015, when Mad Men wraps up. Ditto Kurt Sutter for Sons of Anarchy, and Alan Ball for True Blood. Try as they might, their hour-long efforts to entertain will never satisfy, not when there are two dozen perfectly well-reasoned and expertly researched pieces arguing the exact opposite, all posted not 45 minutes after the show ends.
So here’s to you, Walter White. No matter what happens to you next Sunday, we’ll never forget you. Or stop complaining.
 
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Maui

TRIBE Member
Meh... Hollywood ending.

I guess the director was lying when he said there would be tears at the end, I dunno what sick fucks would be crying over Walt dying.

Pretty far fetched also. Walt's the most wanted man in America and he's cruising around like nobody's business, visiting Skylar when they know he's in town? lol Yeah good one. The gun thing c'mon now...

No curve balls, everything goes perfect for Walt. Although I guess that's how his luck has gone since day one.
 
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Lojack

TRIBE Member
I agree, satisfying. My only complaint is the call to Lydia saying that he poisoned her with ricin. It is best to have only hinted at it, IMO. That said, very well done.

And to quote a comment from the AV Club "One of the most critically acclaimed TV shows in in the history of the medium ENDED WITH THE MAIN CHARACTER KILLING NAZIS WITH A ROBOT GUN."
 

Hawk Eye

TRIBE Member
I was a bit disappointed.. i dunno. I just wasn't satisfied with the ending. Mind you, I think it might be bc i am just sad it's over :(
 

KickIT

TRIBE Member
Loved the scene with the Schwartzes.

Hated that the car keys were in the visor.

Loved the ending.

Hate that its over.

Where do you think Jesse would go first?
 

Hawk Eye

TRIBE Member
I thought he was going to drive into a tree or another car with the way he was driving. He just looked completely and utterly deranged.
 
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