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The art of "Digging" has been lost?

PAUZE

TRIBE Promoter
I have decided to start a thread about the art of "Digging", because someone on Facebook posted this which sparked a pretty massive debate on his wall. I am not going to mention any names, but would love to see what Tribe has to say about this.

So this person's status write's: "New pet peeve: people who peak over my shoulder when I am mixing to write down the track I am playing in my Traktor". This sparked a massive debate on his wall. Some big producers saying they don't like telling people anything because they had to search for hours etc etc.

Back in the day when we used to buy vinyl, it was about "digging", spending hours and hours in record stores trying to find those hidden gems. Tracks that may have been hidden by another dj so he could come back and pick them up later. Tracks that may have fallen behind in one of Play De's bins.

You used to have to spend a great deal of time in stores to have a different/unique sound. You didn't have access to the same music that everyone else does as with Beatport/Juno Digital today.

Personally, I don't mind too much because I believe that everyone plays music differently. You can give Joe Gino your tracklisting but there's a small chance he's gonna have the upper edge on you.

Another small but important point to mention is the fact that we need to support labels. Some of the smaller one's will never get the recognition they deserve or make money in order to expand.

Just a few of my thoughts.

Discuss....
 

possibledj

TRIBE Promoter
I have never understood why this is a big deal. I will NEVER hesitate to ask someone what track they just played, and I am always more than happy to share with someone when I am playing. when you think about the odds of someone 'getting an edge on you' (whatever that means) because you told them the name of the track you just played vs. how much they are probably going to enjoy going home and getting that track themselves, it strikes me as absolutely ridiculous that a DJ wouldn't share the name of the track. I mean seriously, if you can't get a gig as a result of telling other DJ the name of a track you just played, I think you've got bigger problems.

Regarding the hours spent digging... I bet dollars to donuts that 99% of DJs don't start out by getting a bunch of gigs, and then roll their eyes about having to make the arduous trek to the record store so that they have to spend countless long, boring hours digging through record bins, or sifting through beatport. DJs start out because they enjoy digging. I have been DJing for 6-7 years now, and I still love that moment where you've been digging your way through the ever increasing volumes of crap on beatport and you find that new track by an artist you've never heard of, check out his other stuff, you're checking out the guys who have remixed his stuff, and their labels, and the nex thing you know, your crate's at $65 and it's 3:30 am. My point is that, to me, that isn't work. And the minute you stop enjoying that, you'd better find a new job.

Secondly, it's not like you wrote the damn thing. You maybe spent two hours sifting through beatport to find it. so someone else wants to play it? cry me a river. and if you actually did write it, I'm pretty sure you would be more than happy to share that.

anyway, I have certainly gotten my share of attitude from fellow DJs who I have asked for IDs. I have also become lifelong friends with some doing the exact same thing. You bascally have the choice to let something bother you, or to take it as a compliment an share the fucking love.
 

Eclectic

TRIBE Member
Digging is useless now.

There's no need to ask/peek over a shoulder anymore with Shazam being very comprehensive on most music.

It's all about networking.

The only way to have a track that nobody else has is to either make it yourself of get it directly from the source.

Other than that, anyone can/will have that song the same day you get it.

Welcome to the internet.
 

PAUZE

TRIBE Promoter
No one on Facebook responded when I wrote: "So what do you do if you own a record label and the track that's playing is from your label, tell them to bugger off?"

lol.
 
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dg0425

TRIBE Member
I bought some cdj 800's two years ago thinking the cheap and easy access to music would mean i'd spin more and and that justified the cost of a xone62 and the 800's. The opposite was true. Turns out it was the saturday afternoons spent digging in 2thebeat, play de, release, etc.... that i liked more than playing the tunes. In two years i've dl'd 11 tracks total and my 800's are covered in dust.
 

Caz

TRIBE Member
Oh give me a fucking break. If you take issue with someone wanting the name of a song they just heard, you shouldn't be DJing. Stay home and wipe the drool of your sweater instead.
 

ghaleon

TRIBE Member
I dig through digital music the same way I do at a record store. I would say crate digging is more sastifying, but digitally its a faster process
 

rentboy

TRIBE Member
i miss crate digging for vinyl. I have fond memories of being in London and digging through scores of bins for classic and rare drum n bass tracks. I've found some gems at Play De and had Dave Cooper return from the basement with obscure cuts.

I don't mind digging through digital catalogues for tunes (there is so much crap to wade through now).
 
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diablo

TRIBE Member
Let's just agree that digital DJing is shit and we should have just stopped time in the year 2000.
 

acheron

TRIBE Member
I would have thought it was the role of DJs, who generally play out tracks in clubs without paying the producers of the tracks any performance royalties, to *promote* the music. i.e. in their own way do as much as possible to help the scene. Throwing down a playlist and keeping it secret is totally unethical. If you want to keep working as a DJ, you need music. Producers need people to know which tracks of theirs are being played out, where and by who so they can keep doing what they're doing. Heck, sharing playlists promotes sales ffs.
 

PAUZE

TRIBE Promoter
My process is super extensive. I download countless dj mixes with tracklistings. I put all of the tracks in my crate. Then i go to each artist who is new to me and put all of their tracks, old or new, in my crate.

Then I go through all of the top downloads and top 10's of artists I am familiar with and enjoy listening to. After taking all of the tracks I like in their top ten I then go to my crate and start refining.

This takes approximately 4-6 hours per week, sometimes more depending on how many new artists I find and how many pages of tracks they have.

At the end of the day I still don't care who knows my tracks as I really enjoy exposing new artists and labels!
 

Wiseman

TRIBE Member
If I had a track out and gave a promo to a number of DJs and heard that one of those DJs refused to tell someone the track ID when asked, you can be sure that DJ would never get a promo from me ever again.
 
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[- FuNKtiOn -]

TRIBE Member
when it comes down to trainspotting, as a dj you should be trying to expose music you like to other people so they want to listen to more of that sound, so for those still afraid to tell people what tracks you play - get your heads out of your asses.

as for the art of digging, it still exists but has changed.
to me, digital digging isn't going on Beatport and going through the releases and choosing songs you like. digital digging to me is going through page after page on Soundcloud and various other artist sites, scoring many free edits and remixes that wouldn't be available otherwise, and also finding about cool tunes that can be found on the retail sites that would otherwise fly under the radar.

that said, I still love hitting Play De and digging through the crates to find old gems that I didn't buy or didn't know about previously. but this works better for funk and rare grooves than it does for most electronic music.
 

derek

TRIBE Member
most djs were guilty of this in the early days. we went to great lengths blacking out labels. mind you release numbers were very limited, so the pool of songs to play from and distinquish yourself was limited, and press quantities were also low.

but i can tell you it was pretty much every dj. pts, dino & terry, malik x, mark oliver, jmk, and the list goes on. although to the credit of some they didn't mind being asked, they just didn't like having somebody peer over their shoulder. i remember some would lie about the track names (some of the names one dj would make up were actually hilarious to those who knew the real track name), this was mostly with rare older funk/disco tunes though, not so much what would have been current tracks at the time.

it also helped being close with the staff at carnival, stars sound, and eventually play d. eric and tyrone use to hold rare or popular tracks for people they knew.

looking back it is pretty lame, but it was pretty much every dj that was doing it. secrecy was key to having the tracks nobody else did. pretty greedy on the djs part to snub the producer though. it was rampant in the late 80s early 90s.

i ain't justifying it, when i look back it was selfish and silly, and i feel kind of stupid for doing it.
 
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PAUZE

TRIBE Promoter
I totally remember back in the day when they used to hold tracks for bigger dj's at Play De. That used to piss me off!
 

[- FuNKtiOn -]

TRIBE Member
when there are only a few copies of a record, it kinda makes more sense.
nowadays when tunes are a dime a dozen, there really shouldn't be this sense of hording that used to take place with people being afraid of telling the names of a tune.

but what it comes down to is that I like to be in a club and hear a dj play tunes that I like, so I'm never like "I can't believe he knows about this tune as well" as much as "good choon, lets dance". so if me telling people the names of tunes I play might mean better music in the club as an attendee later, whats the harm?
 
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Bacchus

TRIBE Promoter
if you can't get a gig as a result of telling other DJ the name of a track you just played, I think you've got bigger problems.
this sums it up completely.

we're in an era now where not only is the market saturated with music - but many genres have stopped growing. Things sound the same all over. If you're unable ot find a tune - you're sure to be able to find one that sounds like it.
 

AgentSanchez

TRIBE Promoter
So this person's status write's: "New pet peeve: people who peak over my shoulder when I am mixing to write down the track I am playing in my Traktor".
I think the problem with this statement is the person who made it - some people seem to think that 'digging' and finding tracks means the music somehow 'theirs'. Fuck man.. underground producers don't make much $$ to begin with (most of them), so when a DJ doesn't give proper credit to people who are interested, its a selfish and prickish move that, IMO, hurts the people actually making the music by limiting their exposure.

Also, if other people seeing your laptop screen is such a huge issue, why not spin CDs or vinyl? fuck...
 

AgentSanchez

TRIBE Promoter
This takes approximately 4-6 hours per week, sometimes more depending on how many new artists I find and how many pages of tracks they have.

At the end of the day I still don't care who knows my tracks as I really enjoy exposing new artists and labels!
And if you're actually any good at it, and stick with it, then you'll ALWAYS have new tracks that other people will ask about. If giving away a few track names causes you to have concern for your competitive edge, then you've got none ;)
 

dj_soo

TRIBE Member
i don't mind if people ask about tunes, but i've literally had people standing behind me writing down every tune i play in the order i play it in. that shit is beyond wack.
 

Caz

TRIBE Member
Seriously why is that whack, do you think you have a secret that must be protected? Tons of DJs have played every track on your list tons of times, maybe even in the same order.

What about recorded mixes with playlists, how is that different?

It's all just so ridiculous.
 
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