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Tesla Motors

CiG

TRIBE Member
Semi-Related...

Did anyone go to the Unveilling of the Tesla Monument in Niagara?

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I want hydrogen cars...
 

zoo

TRIBE Member
that's pretty misleading advertising, they should call it "Electric Battery Motors", this car has nothing to do with tesla coils!

 

Sinister Shadow

TRIBE Member
Definite step in the right direction I think. The major issue is definitely battery disposal and lifetime. They suggest you'll get 100,000 miles or better from the batteries. Those can be recycled. But still, a large waste product. In addition the power still has to come from somewhere.
They've taken that into account and given a conservative 135MPG rating to the car. That's smart. It's not free clean energy, but it's cleaner.
Now we just need one on the market for the rest of us. One that won't cost 100k+
 

I_bRAD

TRIBE Member
Sinister Shadow said:
Now we just need one on the market for the rest of us. One that won't cost 100k+
It's called the Prius.

I wonder what the range is on that thing in the dead of winter?

Definitely not the first production electric though, GM already had the EV-1

I think they need to reconsider what constitutes a "4 cylinder high performance engine":

 

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
^^^(@Sinister Shadow) Yeah one thing that's been pointed out to me before about electric cars, is that even though the car itself might emit very few pollutants, the energy to charge that battery still has to come from somewhere and often comes from coal plants, which isn't much of an improvement environmentally on a gas-powered combustion engine.
 

I_bRAD

TRIBE Member
Subsonic Chronic said:
^^^(@Sinister Shadow) Yeah one thing that's been pointed out to me before about electric cars, is that even though the car itself might emit very few pollutants, the energy to charge that battery still has to come from somewhere and often comes from coal plants, which isn't much of an improvement environmentally on a gas-powered combustion engine.
Imagine if everyone in Ontario charged their cars in addition to the current load! We can't even keep the AC running much less all the cars.
 

Rataxès

TRIBE Member
I_bRAD said:
I think they need to reconsider what constitutes a "4 cylinder high performance engine":

That's 140ft/lbs of neck-snapping torque....wooooo-WEEEEEEE!!!

Electric cars simply shift the energy/emissions burden elsewhere - good to keep smog in cities down, but you'll have a big coal-fired plant somewwhere running the generators.
 

salad

TRIBE Member
I_bRAD said:
I wonder what the range is on that thing in the dead of winter?
Most open-top cars are not going be driving in the snow anyays. ;)

I think the concept is a step in a different direction (even if it turns out to not be the right one). At least they are looking about providing a vehicle that, overall, requires less energy to operate.

As with all new toys, the early adopters pay the high prices to have the thing first. Ten years from now though, the technology will be mass marketed. Once it has been perfected, it can be placed in regular, everyday sedans, at a fraction of the current price.
 

vinder

TRIBE Member
there was actually a production electric car in teh 80's. they were eventually recalled and all destroyed. there was a documentary on it called "who killed the electric car?"
 

I_bRAD

TRIBE Member
salad said:
I think the concept is a step in a different direction (even if it turns out to not be the right one). At least they are looking about providing a vehicle that, overall, requires less energy to operate.
It's 248hp! That's more energy than a typical family car uses (although it's getting close these days), and it only seats 2.
 

I_bRAD

TRIBE Member
vinder said:
there was actually a production electric car in teh 80's. they were eventually recalled and all destroyed. there was a documentary on it called "who killed the electric car?"
It was the EV-1, and they weren't technically recalled as they were leased (with no buyout option)
 

RumRogerz

TRIBE Member
looks pretty sweet,
the tech specs are pretty awesome too

i just don't know if the price will even be worth saving all that milage.
 

AdRiaN

TRIBE Member
I_bRAD said:
Imagine if everyone in Ontario charged their cars in addition to the current load! We can't even keep the AC running much less all the cars.
Since the batteries take several hours to recharge, I would imagine that most people would charge their electric cars overnight rather than during periods of peak electricity demand. Also, Ontario is moving towards time-of-use pricing, so the cost of charging your electric vehicle overnight will be about two-thirds less than during the day.

That being said, I have always been curious to run the numbers and see exactly how much additional electricity would be required if every personal vehicle in Ontario were replaced with an electric car. I'm just not sure where to find the data.
 

vinder

TRIBE Member
I_bRAD said:
I bet you heard the same interview I did on the radio the other morning ;)
actually i was watching some show that was doing a piece on the documentary i mentioned
 

vinder

TRIBE Member
AdRiaN said:
Since the batteries take several hours to recharge, I would imagine that most people would charge their electric cars overnight rather than during periods of peak electricity demand. Also, Ontario is moving towards time-of-use pricing, so the cost of charging your electric vehicle overnight will be about two-thirds less than during the day.

That being said, I have always been curious to run the numbers and see exactly how much additional electricity would be required if every personal vehicle in Ontario were replaced with an electric car. I'm just not sure where to find the data.
totally. and i wonder exactly how much extra that energy would cost compared to buying gasoline.

anyone find any info on how much this car is going to cost?
 

AdRiaN

TRIBE Member
Rataxès said:
Electric cars simply shift the energy/emissions burden elsewhere - good to keep smog in cities down, but you'll have a big coal-fired plant somewwhere running the generators.
A valid point, but the trade-off between pollution generated by vehicles and pollution generated by power plants is not one-for-one. A large power plant is more efficient in converting fossil fuels to energy than thousands of small combustion engines ("economies of scale").

My guess is that a wholesale shift to electric cars would probably increase pressure to build nuclear plants over the long run, rather than increasing coal-fired generation to meet the additional electricity demand. Nuclear power is emissions free, but there is always the inevitable criticism of the radioactive waste. It's a bit of a connundrum for environmentalists.
 

Rataxès

TRIBE Member
AdRiaN said:
A valid point, but the trade-off between pollution generated by vehicles and pollution generated by power plants is not one-for-one. A large power plant is more efficient in converting fossil fuels to energy than thousands of small combustion engines ("economies of scale").

My guess is that a wholesale shift to electric cars would probably increase pressure to build nuclear plants over the long run, rather than increasing coal-fired generation to meet the additional electricity demand. Nuclear power is emissions free, but there is always the inevitable criticism of the radioactive waste. It's a bit of a connundrum for environmentalists.
It's true that a large, centralized pollution emitter (e.g. generating station) is easier to manage pollution-wise than thouisands of small emitters (cars). However, I am doubtful that nuclear power, as much as I prefer it as an option, will be the main source of energy. The US has vast coal reserves and an intense coal lobby which will push hard to see more coal fired plants built. Nuclear power has a bad image to overcome regardless of how safe and emission free it is, not to mention the spectacular mismanagement that nuclear plants have suffered from in the past casting a huge shadow over atomic enrgy. Additionally, nuclear power plants have much longer ROI windows compared to coal fired plants and coal-fired plants tend to scale better (although experimental, modular pebble-bed reactor technologies offer a more scalable nuclear alternative.)

One funny aside
about electric cars it that they have a much higher incident of pedestrian/bird/animal collisions because they are so quiet that people don't hear them coming.
 
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