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Tennis Elbow - Turning to Tribe for help

So I've been researching on Google the means of treating tendonitis, but haven't been having a whole lot of luck in treating my left arm when it comes to this for the last couple of weeks.

I understand that it takes usually 6-12 weeks in order to let it heal, but is there anything I can do to treat this without having to stop or slow down my workout routine?

Anyone had any experience in treating this? I've been trying to research a means of getting around this, and haven't had a whole lot of luck.
 

agentRC4

TRIBE Member
Ice before and after your workout. Stretch and hold for a solid minute. Get a tennis elbow brace to help take the pressure off of the muscle.
 
agentRC4 said:
Ice before and after your workout. Stretch and hold for a solid minute. Get a tennis elbow brace to help take the pressure off of the muscle.
The stretching doesn't seem to help things very much, and the tennis elbow brace I'm finding restricts movement while in the gym. I try to ice it a bit after the workout, but why before? Wouldn't it cause the muscles to contract and work against the stretch?
 

agentRC4

TRIBE Member
el presidente Highsteppa said:
The stretching doesn't seem to help things very much, and the tennis elbow brace I'm finding restricts movement while in the gym. I try to ice it a bit after the workout, but why before? Wouldn't it cause the muscles to contract and work against the stretch?
The tendon/muscle is constantly inflammed, the ice before a workout helps decrease the post workout inflammation.

But the best treatment for tennis elbow is about 2 weeks of complete rest (this means doing nothing at all) and get massage done on it to help break-up the scar tissue that has formed. Massage will help break this up and give the muscles better fluidity.

Also, if you're going to workout, keep your elbow and wrists out of extreme range in either direction.
 
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Okay, thank you for the explanation. Just out of curiosity, do you know if would a chiropractor be able to help with the joint strain? The one I've been seeing has been quite good with some of the stiffness in my shoulders, but I'm a bit skeptical as to how good they can be with other joints.
 

agentRC4

TRIBE Member
From my experience a chiro won't be able to help you unless they do actual soft tissue work like Active Release Technique (ART).
 

NemIsis

TRIBE Member
Back away from the cell phone..

No not kidding, it causes, and/or aggravates tendonitis :0
 

KiX

TRIBE Member
agentRC4 said:
The tendon/muscle is constantly inflammed, the ice before a workout helps decrease the post workout inflammation.

But the best treatment for tennis elbow is about 2 weeks of complete rest (this means doing nothing at all) and get massage done on it to help break-up the scar tissue that has formed. Massage will help break this up and give the muscles better fluidity.

Also, if you're going to workout, keep your elbow and wrists out of extreme range in either direction.
just out of curiosity, can i ask what your background in injury rehab is? some of the stuff you reccomend is so sketchy.

you don't want to massage to break up scar tissue during a flareup. the tendon is breaking down during this stage, you don't want to encourage that. massage during the acute stages of tendonitis to the affected tendon would increase local inflammation and microtrauma, which would worsen the condition. same reason you put ice on it and not heat. control the inflammation and trauma to minimize the degeneration.

no work should be done to the actual tendon site, gentle work is done to the affected muscle bellies, and antagonists are treated normally but scar work doesn't come into play until the tendonitis is in the chronic stages.

james, you really need to find the cause of the problem - perhaps your postural mechanics are messed up, perhaps your computer setup is crappy, perhaps you're doing too much load at the gym and your forearms aren't strong enough to handle the load, perhaps you have strength imbalances, etc...

ice is best during flareup (remember to ice with the muscles in a comfortably lengthened position), and heat is best in the chronic stages to relax the surrounding musculature.

i'd reccomend rest until the inflammatory flareup has died down. let your body catch up and heal what's going on. the more you use it and stress the area, the longer healing will take.

=tina=
 
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KiX

TRIBE Member
agentRC4 said:
From my experience a chiro won't be able to help you unless they do actual soft tissue work like Active Release Technique (ART).
:rolleyes: what if the tendonitis is happening due to altered biomechanics or improper joint mechanics? a chiro would totally be able to help in that case. chiropractors also do a lot of soft tissue work beyond ART (which is just a fancy trademarked name for a technique most manual therapists know anyways). a chiro would also be able to perform a full assessment to determine the source of the tendonitis (or rule out other conditions) and determine the appropriate course of treatment. a massage therapist or physiotherapist would be able to do this as well, so it's up to the client to determine what health care provider to talk to.


=tina=
 

jasonchaos

TRIBE Promoter
el presidente Highsteppa said:
So I've been researching on Google the means of treating tendonitis, but haven't been having a whole lot of luck in treating my left arm when it comes to this for the last couple of weeks.

I understand that it takes usually 6-12 weeks in order to let it heal, but is there anything I can do to treat this without having to stop or slow down my workout routine?

Anyone had any experience in treating this? I've been trying to research a means of getting around this, and haven't had a whole lot of luck.

lots of rest for about a week or so treat with tiger balms and that then ice, take it easy on activity doing little to none
 

dvs

TRIBE Promoter
lookup medial epicondylitis or lateral epicondilytis. (aka... tennis or golfer's elbow. depending on origin of pian being medial or lateral, natch.)

it's an inflammation due to overuse, plain and simple, so the only thing that's gonna make it any better is treatment (nsaids & ice) and limited or no use until the inflammation subsides.

as for wearing braces of any sort, they may help a bit but they won't reduce any existing inflammation.

d
 
Tina, thanks for the tip. Right now, I'm backing off from the gym. Would it be a bad thing though to continue my swimming?

As for everyone else, thanks again for the help on this.
 
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KiX

TRIBE Member
swimming, tho one of the best forms of low impact resistance exercise may still be too much for it right now if it's currently painful or you're experiencing increased heat in the area (interestingly, with tendonitis, although there is an inflammatory response, you can't palpate swelling in the area usually).

after some selfcare, when you're not experiencing pain you should work on maintaining balance in muscle strength between your wrist flexors and extensors primarily.

=tina=
 

agentRC4

TRIBE Member
Kix you're on CRACK - please see the CLUBBING BABY SEAL THREAD about getting educated on a subject.

IF you want to know my background, I have a Kinesiology degree with post grad in Athletic Therapy. Certified in CAN and US. I also have completed Active Release Techniques for the Upper, Lower and Spine. I'm also in the final stage of completing my Osteo degree. Oh, also, my wife is a Massage Therapist with NISA (Neuromuscular Intergration and Structural Alignment) designation.

Does that answer you question about my background. Please DO NOT question my answers, as Tennis elbow is a chronic state of inflammation by which there is scar tissue and massage would indeed help this. Also massage would help with the elimination of the swelling and bi-products at any stage.



So what is the fancy name that therapist know for ART??

It is a specific type of myofacial release also know as a level 4 release. But if you want to learn myofacial release you need to take a course.
 

deep

TRIBE Member
Any kind of overuse injury, I think your best bet is to just take the time off necessary to let it heal 100%. IME, for a variety of different injury grades, all attempts to "work through" the injury still prolongs the recovery time to more than it would be if doing nothing further to exacerbate it. Especially with connective tissue / inflammation type injuries where the healing exactly requires the inflammation to go down, not be bumped back up periodically through use.

It may be mentally tough to take the time off, but it becomes a lot easier if you frame it like this: a few weeks off now, by choice, or months off later, by force of more severe injury.
 

lucky1

TRIBE Member
Are you aware of what caused it? I developed "tennis elbow" pains from working at a not properly adjusted workstation (computer desk job, I do a lot of typing).. I didn't really treat it, the ergonomist guy, Ross, came in and helped allign my workstation and chair. it just went away on its own.
 

agentRC4

TRIBE Member
oh, one more thing.

Please do not take any advise regarding a medical problem from a message board.

Go see your doctor, physio, chrio, massage therapsit and have them look at it and treat your injury accordingly.

But as it has been stated here before - when in doubt - rest and ice are always your best choice.
 
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KiX

TRIBE Member
direct massage therapy tecniques on the affected tendon of any tendonitis during an acute flare up is a contraindication. period. any reputable massage therapy school will teach you that. the scar tissue is only to be addressed in the chronic stages of the condition or you will make the condition worse and enhance the degeneration and inflammation.

if inflammation is the concern, something like lymph drainage is advisable, not the type of massage that would break down scar tissue. inflammation is rarely the concern with tendonitis anyways.

scar tissue work is absolutely reccomended in the CHRONIC stages of tendonitis, but absolutely not during acute, painful, flareup stages. do you realize how painful friction techniques would be on acute tendonitis!?

lol no massage therapist needs any sort of special certification to do myofacial release, we learn it in school day one pretty much, and is incorporated in every treatment for most conditions. lol 'NISA' and other namebrand techniques are fairly basic concepts that slightly vary from typical myofascial work, that are either taught in schools like the one i went to, or you can learn in simple weekender courses.

active release therapy is taught under non-trademarked names such as "dynamic release" (that's how we were taught it). you don't need to shell out $10,000 to achieve the exact same effect with pretty much the exact same techniques. sorry, but it's pretty much a cash grab with a fancy name. it just got super popular because of it's effectiveness, but it isn't something out of the scope of a properly trained therapist sans-name. you're paying for use of the name pretty much.

i will absolutely question sketchy advice given in regards about health, i'm one of the few people who knows better about shit like this around here to be able to question it. please, just because someone is a doctor or a chiropractor or a kinesiologist doesn't mean they're going to give good advice 100% of the time. i trust someone like deep more than i'd trust half the health care practitioners i know! and i will -especially- question sketchy advice when it's directly related to my own personal field of expertise (massage therapy).

=tina=
 

Interchange

TRIBE Promoter
I have had tennis elbow on and off since i was 12 - it was gone for a while and over the past 5 years it acts up during sports, ie, yoga, kayaking, biking even writing for long periods of time or when the weather is bad out.

I went to see my doc last week about it he reccomended me to physiothreapy, perscription for lotion and told me to buy a brace for my hand to wear at night... meh i have done none of these things yet, but the flare up went away and my ass is broke.
He did say it is a very hard thing to treat.
 

KiX

TRIBE Member
agentRC4 said:
Does that answer you question about my background. Please DO NOT question my answers, as Tennis elbow is a chronic state of inflammation by which there is scar tissue and massage would indeed help this.
i think i should clarify. while any tendonitis is "chronic" in nature, there are acute flareups that occur. these tend to come and go so long as the true cause isn't addressed appropriately. during an acute flareup, treatment is to follow acute treatment protocol on the affected musculature. and the types of massage you're suggesting are contraindicated during this particular stage, which seems to be what stage james is at. obviously he has to be properly assessed and other conditions need to be ruled out, but to seek that type of massage may cause more damage and pain.

when the inflammation has calmed down, the cause has been corrected and the musculature can be addressed appropriately without compounding the inflammation, then you can start fricitions. frictions work because they CAUSE inflammation - this breaks down scar tissue to be later realigned with streching and set with icing. frictions while the tendon is acutely inflammed will only cause more inflammation, which in turn leads to more degeneration.

if you have a better answer i'd love to hear it. seriously, i believe health care providers should be open to suggestion and their advice should always be in question.

=tina=
 
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agentRC4

TRIBE Member
KiX said:
if you have a better answer i'd love to hear it. seriously, i believe health care providers should be open to suggestion and their advice should always be in question.

=tina=
totally agree. But one thing you need to understand is that while ART is a form of Myofacial release, it is not a true myofacial release in the sense that most techniques to release the fasia are cross fibre. ART is more of a technique closely aligned with sarcomere pumping, where by the longitudinal fibres are "pumped" and swelling is decreased. ART can infact be used in the acute state, you just need to monitor where you are treating.

But I agree you must treat the cause inorder to affect true change.

however if you read some of my earlier posts I suggested that he rest and Ice for a solid 2 weeks then try massage to help break-up the scaring.

so whats your background?
 
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