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techno room book club (was intrigued)

Dave Lee

TRIBE Member
Got a couple of books I thought I'd mention that I got for xmas:
1) Got the collected McSweeneys (vol 1-3) which I was dying to get for the longest time. So far it has been.... interesting. I'll have more a report later. If you haven't heard of McSweeneys before have a peek on indigo

2) The Ruined Map by Kobe Abe. I loved the first two books I read by Abe that I decided to pick up another. The blurb on the back of this one says "...combines the narrative suspense of Chandler with the surreal imagery of Kafka and the psychological acuity of Dostoevsky". Sounds pretty neat :)

3) Sleep Country by Yasunari Kawabata. My gf's father told me this book changed his life so I decided to pick it up. Gotta read something that has changed someone's life.
 

gsnuff

TRIBE Promoter
Originally posted by Dave Lee
2) The Ruined Map by Kobe Abe. I loved the first two books I read by Abe that I decided to pick up another. The blurb on the back of this one says "...combines the narrative suspense of Chandler with the surreal imagery of Kafka and the psychological acuity of Dostoevsky". Sounds pretty neat :)
I really have to get my ass in gear re: Abe. I wanted to read him before but the mention of Mr. Kafka really raises my eybrow. Up until a week ago, I've had no time to read.. but I was still carrying a copy of Kafkas "Paradoxes and Parables" around with me - which is full of bitesized meditations on various topics.

Xmas was quite kind to my library.. I'm about to hop on a bus to Manhattan and am especially eager to dig into "The Problem of Media: US Communication Politics in the 21st Century" by Robert W. McChesney which has been described to me as a comprehensive survey of the deregulation of media (ownership/monopoly) and Deleuze and Guattari's "Mille Plateau" which I've been building up to reading for several years.
 
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isoprax

TRIBE Promoter
latest few read...

Sirens Of Titan - Kurt Vonnegut
Elegant Universe - Brian Greene
The Dancing Wu Li Masters - Gary Zukav
The Human Factor - Kim Vicente


all of them sweet.
 

seeker

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by isoprax

The Dancing Wu Li Masters - Gary Zukav
that reminds me that I need to finish reading this one. hrmm...

'techno rebels' is going well. about what I expected from reading the blurb. aside from that, I also started Stephen King's "The Green Mile" just before Christmas. I don't normally read him, but more than one person has recommended that I see the movie, and others have recommended the book. it seems like reasonable fiction so far.
 

geminigirl

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by isoprax
latest few read...

Sirens Of Titan - Kurt Vonnegut
Elegant Universe - Brian Greene
The Dancing Wu Li Masters - Gary Zukav
The Human Factor - Kim Vicente


all of them sweet.

Gary Zukav is a wicked Author. I just got my 3rd book by him for Christmas, The Heart of the Soul...can't wait to start reading it.
 

derek

TRIBE Member
just finished reading the mckenna brothers - the invisible landscape

currently reading:

pkds - lies inc (the unteleported man)
 

seeker

TRIBE Member
hey derek, did you get much out of that 'invisible landscape'? i was thinking about that one again. i remember it being quite slow and heavy stuff. just wondering what you thought of it...
 

ian

TRIBE Member
I'm currently reading "The Fuck-Up" by Arthur Nersesian. Amusing book about a loser in NYC.
 

The Kid

TRIBE Member
Reading On The Road by Jack Kerouac... interesting book but still not sure what all the hype I've heard is about? Maybe I'm not looking at it in the context of the time it was written?

Anyways... fun read.
 

ian

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by The Kid
Reading On The Road by Jack Kerouac... interesting book but still not sure what all the hype I've heard is about? Maybe I'm not looking at it in the context of the time it was written?

Anyways... fun read.
Also, I think it has more of an impact when you read it as a young person. . . Don't forget to read it quickly : )
 

derek

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by seeker
hey derek, did you get much out of that 'invisible landscape'? i was thinking about that one again. i remember it being quite slow and heavy stuff. just wondering what you thought of it...

yeah, it's pretty heavy reading at times. most of their theories, by their own admission, and advancements in neurobiology have been shown to be dated and inaccurate . the postulation on holographic memory, and drug activated molecular chemical reactions are interesting. essentially, they view universal phenomenon from sub-atomic to the grand, as at type of hologram, or at leasht, having holographic qualities. psycho-active chemicals react at a molecular level permiting the individual to perceive the fabric of reality.

the second part of the book gets in the the I-Ching. i'll leave that for a later review
 

The Kid

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by ian
Also, I think it has more of an impact when you read it as a young person. . . Don't forget to read it quickly : )
Heh! I'm a little further through it now - it's picking up nicely...
 

Destro Sanchez

TRIBE Member
attention Haruki Marukami fans!!!!!!


there is a new book out. (birthday present - thanks!)

"Kafka On The Shore"

after browsing through this thread again, I have to remember to write some of these titles down!!!


Just finished "Ham On Rye" by Charles Bukowski.

My commute isn't the same treacha'ness, so I have been reading less. But more free time is bess.


anything I should write down the next time I pass through this thread?


Destro
 

watanabee

TRIBE Member
If you like Murakami check out a novel by David Mitchell called Number Nine Dream. He's an British expat living in Tokyo and writes in a very similar style as Murikami and even mentions Murikami in the book. A little bit of a fresh take on a great writing style and asian scenery.
 

Dave Lee

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by watanabee
If you like Murakami check out a novel by David Mitchell called Number Nine Dream. He's an British expat living in Tokyo and writes in a very similar style as Murikami and even mentions Murikami in the book. A little bit of a fresh take on a great writing style and asian scenery.
Is it anything like Kazuo Ishiguro writing on Britain?
 

d.code

TRIBE Member
I read a fuck of a lot at my job. One weekends I usually do 12 hour shift with nothing to do.

Anyways- I just finished one of the better books I have ever read. American Gods by Neil Gaimen.

The story is basically about the old gods- and how they were brought to America and abandoned for what ever reason. Weather thats slave masters beating the will out of the slaves or people just loosing belief. It follows an ex-con named Shadow who has a thing for doing coin tricks who gets hired by one of the old gods to help gather the old guys for a war with the new gods. Gods of the internet, tv, media, cellphones and other modren day things. Quite the ending- and an awsome read. Gaimen is one of the favorites.
 

Hal-9000

TRIBE Member
^^Can't say I enjoyed the book as much as you (interesting premise, flawed execution in my opinion). That said, did you know that the House on The Rock actually exist? I just found that out recently and was pleasantly suprised.
 

seeker

TRIBE Member
The edition of American Gods I read had a bit by Gaiman saying that most of the landmarks mentioned exist. I enjoyed the book quite a bit.

Right now I'm reading "The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress" by Robert A Heinlein. Quite good so far.
 

d.code

TRIBE Member
I found a map online actually that traces shadow's route through america. Kind of intresting. Apparently Gaimen did some extensive touring of the states to research his locations.

Have you read anything else by Gaimen Hal-9k?
 

watanabee

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Dave Lee
Is it anything like Kazuo Ishiguro writing on Britain?
I have no idea. Was his take on Britain interesting or a disaster.
I'm currently reading the Lonely Planet Guide to Laos as i'm going there in 4 months.
 

HMP

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by oddmyth
BBB: The book is far more intense than the movie, I couldn't put it down.

Cheers
Todd
lolita is written in a densely, poetic prose that appropriated --and brilliantly twisted --the popular romantic form at the time. nabokov purposely chose the topic almost with malicious genious -- he created a finely crafted story of love lost by a pedophile and thereby just turned the genre to shit for anyone else. and he did it so well, he had the last laugh.

i loved it, too, and no movie has been able to do it justice.
 

gsnuff

TRIBE Promoter
Originally posted by HMP
lolita is written in a densely, poetic prose that appropriated --and brilliantly twisted --the popular romantic form at the time. nabokov purposely chose the topic almost with malicious genious -- he created a finely crafted story of love lost by a pedophile and thereby just turned the genre to shit for anyone else. and he did it so well, he had the last laugh.

i loved it, too, and no movie has been able to do it justice.
I just watched a film version of The Defense called Luhzin's Defense. It wasn't bad.. it's funny though, in terms of the narrative and depth of the book.. you'd guess that the movie was made 80 years before the book.. not vice versa. I always find it ironic that most book-> movie conversions only appropriate the base plot and leave out all of the good stuff.
 

Destro Sanchez

TRIBE Member
Lolita is another I have to cross off my 'must read' list.

update: Kafka on the Shore by H. Marukami is even better than Wind Up Bird Chronicle! (maybe it's because I relate to the main character more than the salaryman in the Chronicle)


Destro
 

oddmyth

TRIBE Member
I need more Marukami. Wind up Bird Chronicles literally killed me, I was a wreck for days.

My empathy for imaginary people is boundless. I couldn't sleep for nights while reading Jane Eyre.

Currently halfway through Nabokov's biography. Never have I read such well threaded tangents, weaving in and out, almost losing you entirely in prose and then bringing you back to the main vein.

Life is good when you're not reading documentation and manuals.
 
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