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techno room book club (was intrigued)

Destro Sanchez

TRIBE Member
OK blue jays,

let's hear what books you've read lately that you would recommend to the techno forum.

I'm about 50 pages away from finishing Wind-Up Bird Chronicle

great book (and it gets the thumbs up from Mr. Smalls and Mr. Baldy) ;)

just started Rule Of The Bone- a great book about a 14 year old punk kid in NY.

finished John Varleys "Steel Beach'- great sci fi book.

just after that I finished:
Douglas Couplands 'All Famillies are Psychotic'..nice quick read. I enjoy his contemporary writing style. He appeals to the gen x in me.

up next in the batter circle I have:
Neil Stephensons 'Diamond Age' and 'Snowcrash'
and also 'The Art oif War'

..and finally, when I get a chance, I want to peep Noam Chomsky's 9/11- reviews anyone?

Destro
 

BigBadBaldy

TRIBE Member
Greg Egan's "Diaspora", or any of his work. Techno-peeps should eat this shit up. One of the best "hard" sci-fi authors I have ever read.
 

tommysmalls

TRIBE Member
i always recommend alan lightman's "einsteins dreams" ... a nice & simple, yet beautiful read.

as for 9/11, it left me a tad disappointed - it really seemed to be thrown todether in a hodge podge of questions that have a great deal of repetition in chomsky's responses...9/11 really needed a better editor.

I recommend this one instead:Power and Terror: Post 9-11 Talks and Interviews
 

ian

TRIBE Member
Another thumbs up from me for "Wind-Up Bird Chronicle" - awesome book :D

I'm reading an old classic, "The Crying of Lot 49" Tomas Pynchon

-ian g.
 

Hal-9000

TRIBE Member
Just finished 'Mr Nice', a biography of Howard Marks. Marks was a Welshman who attended Oxford in the late 60's and ended up being the largest global smuggler of hashish in the 70's and 80's. He had something like 40 aliases and his line of work brought him in direct and indirect contact with the M14, the I.R.A, the Mafia all over the world. Truely fascinating character.

Just started 'The Devil In The White City' a non-fiction story piece about the The Worlds Fair in Chicago in 1893. A two-pronged story: half of which tells the story of the architects and landscape designers scrambling to build something that would eclipse the Paris exposition of a few years earlier against considerable odds; the other half focusing on the charismatic serial killer who stalked the grounds of the fair. Very good so far, especially the stories that concern the architects and builders.
 

zoo

TRIBE Member
i read microserfs months back

i've been working on "the hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy: a trilogy in five parts" for awhile now

it's retarded long [but funny]


after that, i'm either going to finish reading Don Quixote, Crime & Punishment, or War and Peace
 

seeker

TRIBE Member
I've done a lot of reading this year -- it's made me quite happy.

Right now I"m working through 'Autobiography of a Yogi' by Paramahansa Yogananda. Probably not for everybody, but if you have an interest in biographies, or yoga, or Christianity, or spirituality, it's a pretty decent read.

I'm also slowly reading 'Thinking In Java' by Bruce Eckels, because I want to be writing more code -- I've nearly lost all of the skills I spent time developing in school.

Aside from that, I've read 'Heart Of Darkness' by Joseph Conrad, which was excellent. Also:
'The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz' - Mordechai Richler
'The Odyssey' - Homer
'The Dharma Bums' - Jack Kerouac
'Flatland' - Edwin A Abbott <-- highly recommeded if you like satire posing as science and philosophy, or is that philosophy posing as science and satire?
'Robinson Crusoe' - Daniel Defoe
'Glue' - Irvine Welsh

As far as what's lined up:

'Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep' - Philip K Dick
'The Picture Of Dorian Gray' - Oscar Wilde
'Our Man In Havana' - Graham Greene
'Swann's Way' - Marcel Proust

I highly agree with BBB that more people should check out Greg Egan. I've read 'Diaspora' and 'Quarantine', and both were excellently mindbending. 'The HItchhiker's Guide' is also really funny, and probably deserves another reading. And if you've never read Philip K Dick or Robert A Heinlein, do yourself a favour and check them out.

(and now each of you has read one more novel, this post! :rolleyes: )
 

oddmyth

TRIBE Member
hmmm in the past four months ...

Dark and strange -

Vladimir Nabakov's "Lolita" - a gripping tale of a man obsessed with one particular lolita, who also happens to be his step daughter.

Vladimir Nabakov's "Pale Fire" - The first half of this book is a poem written by a different author. The second half is a critique fo the poem by one of his close friends, who also happens to be the king of a small country called Zembla, and is partially responsible for the authour of the poems death. Immensely intricate work, an unbelieveably good read. Not recommended as a starting point for Nabakov though.

Irving Welsh - "Porno" - Hard to read this one on the bus without getting a few strange looks, but I'm digging it. I feel dirty when I read it, Welsh really knows how to recreate the dirty secrets in peoples lives. Some of the situations are very surreal to me simply because I've met several people that emulate the characters in this book.

Computer Nerd fluff -

Cory Doctorow - "Down and out in the Magic Kingdom" - After reading a short review on /. I sniffed out this downloadable eBook (anyone else read these? I read books off my computer much faster than I read them on paper). Futuristic earth sci fi stuff where money no longer exists and people buy things with "whuffie" (basically who well reputed you are in society). A light but funny and intriguing read.

Classics -

Ernest Hemingway - "The Garden of Eden" - Some people say Hemingway was a bore, and his writing too simplistic. I find both statements to be untrue. He writes simply to disallow vagueness, and his simple writing style really makes a person gullible to his unique portrayal of sarcasm. This story involves a newlywed couple and their adventures while summering down the southwest coast of Europe. The husband is a write and the wife an financially well off lady who enjoys being unique. They both fall in love with a girl, and take her on their adventures. Anyone who has read Hemingway already knows there's one thing this book has lot of in great detail : DRINKING. Reading it just made me want Perrier and whisky.

Franz Kafka - "Metamorphisis and other short stories" - Strange man Kafka, I love these stories though, essential reading methinks, I don't want to give anything away on this one.

Next up for me will be rereading Asimov's "Foundation" series (eBooks again). I saw a new Tom Robbins the other day too that I keep meaning to pick up. Anyone read that yet?

Cheers
oddbox
 

ian

TRIBE Member
UHh. . . well thank you very much. ;)

-ian g.

Some of the situations are very surreal to me simply because I've met several people that emulate the characters in this book.
 

oddmyth

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by BigBadBaldy
Todd: How did you like "Lolita"? I've always been curious to read the book, compared to the film (which I love).
BBB: The book is far more intense than the movie, I couldn't put it down.

Cheers
Todd
 

JGirlP

TRIBE Member
Just finished reading Tennessee William's play "A Streetcar Named Desire." a really fun four hour read...have never seen the movie. Can you believe it?

I'm currently reading "Souvenir of Canada" from Douglas Coupland. I'll tell you all about it when I'm finished. He's taken a collection of still lifes that truly encapsulate Canadian life and then he seems to be backing it up with childhood memories. So far anyway.

Before all of this I read "The Time Machine" by HG Wells. Way better than any movie however the latest one did the book justice by giving us a chance to see how Wells may have written the book if he was born later in the last century.

Before that I struggled through only 5 pages of "The Rebel" by Albert Camus. God help me I will finish that book by the end of the summer!!!

Before that I read "All tomorrows Parties" by William Gibson....holy piece of boring crap!! Totally not up to his usual standards with that one. I'm interested to see what "Pattern Recognition" will be like.
 

Bean

TRIBE Member
I'm making my way through the latest Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering. The theme is ice, and the paper I'm in the midst of reading is about global warming and ice break up.

I've got a Calvin and Hobbes comic collection sitting on my nighstand to provide some non-technical relief. :)

I recently read The Food Bible by Judith Wills. It really should be used as a resouce, but I did find it a good read.

I used to be such a bookworm growing up and am trying to get back into that habit. :)

Peace,

Sabina

.:. Share what you know, learn what you don't .:.
 

erk

TRIBE Member
Anything by Linda McQuaig ("The Cult of Impotence", "Shooting the Hippo") is boung to make you angry in the political type arena. However, if you're a right winger you may just hate her...or have her change your mind.
"Diamond Age" by Neil Stephenson is awesome. I really enjoyed that one. Just tore through it. Sometimes that's a rarity for Mr. ADD over here.
I'm on to Philip K. Dick's "The Man in the White Tower". So far so good.
Keep the recommendations coming. The last one got me on to Philip K. Dick.
 

tommysmalls

TRIBE Member
at my bedside:
chomsky - architecture of language
vonnegut - welcome to the monkey house
vukovic - art of attack (chess)
murakami - sputnik sweatheart

...and today i'm going to pick up a book on the eames brothers - i'm more interested in the house they designed, but they're more famous for their furniture.

..i also plan to revisit herman hesse's "siddhartha" this summer, and perhaps some of his other works.

cheers,
t
 

erk

TRIBE Member
Oh yeah, George Orwell's "Animal Farm" is a good one. Clocks in at under 100 pages too for people who are afraid of commitment. Good afternoon's read.
 

tommysmalls

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by erk

Keep the recommendations coming. The last one got me on to Philip K. Dick.
proceed with caution if you are interested in "Valis" - it is a serious head trip...i am told its one of the last books he wrote, and madness had taken over his mind.
 

Harmonika

TRIBE Member
Ghostwritten - David Mitchell: read this for a second time -awesome narrative, with interconnected scenes and POV from Hong Kong, Ulan Bator, London, Petersburg and so on. One of the best modern writers to come along in a while, imho.

Stupid White Men - Michael Moore: I'd been wanting to get my hands on this since it came out, but it wasn't available in the Philippines. Pretty much what I expected, with lots of juicy bits that made me even angrier about the U.S. than I was before.

The Wheel Of Time - Carlos Castaneda: I'm really diggin' ancient cultures again (was very into Norse and Roman mythology when I was a wee yun), and this compilation of wisdom collected from his many years spent studying with Mexican shamen is perfect for those long sits in the library (read: bathroom).

...and of course, given the current temperament of the planet, I had to revisit Huxley's "Brave New World" and Orwell's "1984" brrrrr...

i.
 

JGirlP

TRIBE Member
...and today i'm going to pick up a book on the eames brothers - i'm more interested in the house they designed, but they're more famous for their furniture.
hmmm I dunno, but are you talkin bout Charles and Rae Ames? The married couple that designed all that funky furniture way back when? hehe if so I don't think they're brothers. I have a cool concise guide to Design in the 20 Century...it's a pocket book, yet the title escapes me. They're featured in a section of it. If you're interested, I'll gladly pass along the name when I'm home.
jjj
 

Destro Sanchez

TRIBE Member
question:

Who was it that wrote that book that inspired the detroit kats

(the one where the word Metroplex was first used..where magic juan jacked it for his label name)

..and what was it called.

I don't have my (techno) history books in front of me.

thanks

Destro
 

Hal-9000

TRIBE Member
Could be 'Future Shock' by Alvin Toffler, as I know Atkins was turned onto that work by Rik Davis as the story goes.
 

tommysmalls

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by JGirlP
hmmm I dunno, but are you talkin bout Charles and Rae Ames? The married couple that designed all that funky furniture way back when? hehe if so I don't think they're brothers. I have a cool concise guide to Design in the 20 Century...it's a pocket book, yet the title escapes me. They're featured in a section of it. If you're interested, I'll gladly pass along the name when I'm home.
jjj
Ha ha!! my bad! :D

Kind of a funny assumption for me to make when reading about Charles and Ray Eames - i didn't think for a second that Ray was his wife (her name was Ray Kaiser before they wed, as they turn out - not the most feminine names out there)..

thanks for setting me straight jjj :)
 
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