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T.O. to Rochester ferry

moose-meat

TRIBE Member
Seems like an interesting prospect.
Only 2.5 hours to get across.
They are talking 3 trips a day , 350 days of the year.

I wonder if it will be a success ? Any bets ?


[ for some reason , I can picture the ferry loaded with garbage trucks on their way to some new landfill site near Oswego ]
 

moose-meat

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by torontobarfly
i'm still trying to think of a reason why i would want to go to rochester........:confused:


NY thruway not far from Rochester , then on to NYC....

I will probably try it once for the novelty.
 

Littlest Hobo

TRIBE Member


It began, one could say, in 1918, when Nick Tahou Hots (now Nick Tahou's) was opened in Rochester on Main Street.1

Tahou's originally served a mixture of hots and potatoes, but it wasn't until much later that the name evolved into what we now know as the Garbage Plate.

"Groups of college kids would come in and say, 'Give me one of those plates with all that garbage on it.' It eventually turned into 'Give me one of those garbage plates,' " Alex Tahou (the founder's grandson) told the Democrat and Chronicle in 2000.2

The Garbage Plate itself is relatively simple. Take a strong paper plate (or a styrofoam container with lid, if it's "to go") and give yourself a good base layer of two out of the following four items:

Home fries
French fries
Baked beans
Macaroni salad
Once that's been established, now comes the "main layer" of your choice: two cheeseburgers, or two hamburgers; a fried fish fillet; two fried eggs; a Delmonico steak; two Texas hots; two white hots (hot dogs without nitrates) -- the list goes on.
On top of that layer, you have deli mustard (not yellow mustard!) smeared on the "main layer," followed by diced raw onion. And then, the final touch.

Rochester has this affinity for a meat sauce (referred to as "hot sauce") which adds a certain level of spice to a cooked item, yet isn't necessarily hot. It's more flavorful than anything else. It's not a tomato-y sauce, like a meat sauce for pasta, but almost on the cusp of being something European, like a goulash sauce without the pasta. No matter the origin, this is the (almost) final ingredient to the plate.

I say it's almost the final ingredient, because many patrons use Frank's RedHot as a condiment for the garbage plate. Others opt for ketchup, though many consider that sacrilege, figuring that if there needed to be a tomato flavor to the plate, it'd have been in the hot sauce to begin with.

The plate itself is served with sourdough bread. There's been speculation as to where it comes from in Rochester; this is not something I'm certain of, so I won't guess now.

(The best picture to date that I've seen online is located here; roadfood.com is a site created by Jane and Michael Stern, who also wrote up the Garbage Plate in their book "Eat Your Way Across the USA.")

For a long time, Tahou's (both the original location, and the Gates location which opened in 1979) were the sole purveyors of the Plate, until other eateries realized that there was a great deal of money in all that mess. These days, there are well over 50 different locations in the Rochester area (and beyond) that serve the garbage plate. Personally, I've travelled as far as Richmond, Virginia and had one at a cafe there.
 
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AGrayson

TRIBE Member
Does it take cars? Would it significantly reduce the time it took to drive from Toronto to NYC? Rochester isn't that far from here anyway, is it..?

Or is it..?

ROCHESTER NIGHTHAWKS SUCK!! GO ROCK GO!!!

Um, yeah.

Adam
 

Adam

TRIBE Member
I read it was supposed to carry 600-700 passengers and about 250 cars.

I'd definitely do this up if I was going to NYC. Wouldn't this cut about 3 hours off the trip from TO?
 
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moose-meat

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Adam
Wouldn't this cut about 3 hours off the trip from TO?
I dont think it ends up as a big time saver. You gotta add in time to get your vehicle OFF the ferry , and then there's the US Customs issue.

However , if its a hot day in July , it looks like a cool alternative than the stop and go mess on the QEW.
 

twitch

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by torontobarfly
i'm still trying to think of a reason why i would want to go to rochester........:confused:

i'm probably not the only one......
Not that I care, but isn't the Baseball Hall of Fame their only well known attraction?
 

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
It would be marginally quicker to take the ferry than to drive.

You'd probably save about 30/45 minutes dependin on whether you can take care of customs while you're on the boat and the time it takes to load/unload.
 
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C-NiCE

TRIBE Promoter
Originally posted by OTIS
Anyone got info on how mch would it cost?
A one-way fare for cars will be $40 (U.S.) plus $20 per passenger, $10 for children 5 to 17, and free for kids under 5.

from the Toronto Star yesterday. article
 
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bucky

TRIBE Member
those garbage plates taste A LOT better than they look and sound.. especially either hungover, or after a few beers.

I think this makes sense for people MAYBE with families, but otherwise for it's not going to cut any time off travel to say NYC.. by the time the ferry crosses the water you'll have to wait to go through customs, and wait for everyone to exit.

add on the cost, it'll cost less in gas and toll money.

someone might say, well theres a lot of malls in rochester to go shopping... but i think most people would just save an hour off the trp and shop in buffalo.

*shrug*
 

knight_bear

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by bucky
those garbage plates taste A LOT better than they look and sound.. especially either hungover, or after a few beers.

I think this makes sense for people MAYBE with families, but otherwise for it's not going to cut any time off travel to say NYC.. by the time the ferry crosses the water you'll have to wait to go through customs, and wait for everyone to exit.

add on the cost, it'll cost less in gas and toll money.

someone might say, well theres a lot of malls in rochester to go shopping... but i think most people would just save an hour off the trp and shop in buffalo.

*shrug*
I've had that Garbage plate at Nick Tahoe's after a hockey tourney in the ROCH!
Definately worth tryin once in your life!
 

AGrayson

TRIBE Member
From this issue of Eye Mag.. pretty damn funny:

Denizens of the centre of the universe were surprised to learn from the Globe and Mail's Jan Wong on Nov. 29 that there's a city across Lake Ontario in Michigan called Rochester, which apparently we will soon be able to get to on a fast ferry. Wong's view of the city -- plagued by violent crime, high unemployment, crumbling buildings -- was essentially that no one on this side of the lake should really bother riding the ferry. Apparently this didn't go over well in that sleepy little Illinois burg.

The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle struck back on Dec. 6 with a front-page article attacking Toronto ("Come for the all-day rush hour!" the story says, "Stay for the inefficient public-transit system!"). Among the horrors they found in our city were traffic and ugly orange lights on the QEW, a mayor too busy to meet with reporters from this uppity New Hampshire town, lots of construction, fish served (gasp!) medium-rare, expensive cab fares, people who were rude to them when they held up the queue at the subway and a hotel-room on Carlton that cost them the outrageous (by their pastoral Maine standards) sum of US$68.49 per night plus taxes.

Citizens of Toronto: we cannot continue to antagonize these people of Rochester, Massachusetts -- they have seen through our friendly charade and stung us with their razor wit. Call off the dogs, Rochester, we admit it: we are big and sophisticated and rich. You win.
 
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