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South Korea impeaches President

Vote Quimby

TRIBE Member
South Korean parliament impeaches President Roh


Associated Press



Seoul, South Korea — South Korea's President Roh Moo-hyun was stripped of his constitutional powers Friday in an unprecedented impeachment vote that rattled a government already struggling to resolve the North Korean nuclear crisis and revive an economic recovery.

The vote on charges of illegal electioneering and incompetence came after hours of scuffles and protests that included one Roh supporter setting himself on fire and another man trying to drive his car up the steps of Parliament and into the building.

Prime Minister Goh Kun will assume Mr. Roh's duties while the Constitutional Court decides whether to unseat the president. The powers include his role as commander-in-chief of South Korea's 650,000-strong military, which faces off against communist North Korea's 1.1 million armed forces across the world's most heavily armed border.

South Korea's main stock index tumbled 5 per cent after the decision and security forces went on heightened vigilance.

By evening, thousands of Roh backers had gathered to hold a candlelight vigil near the National Assembly building, decrying the impeachment as a "mutiny."

The pro-Roh Uri party, which had tried to physically block the vote by commandeering the National Assembly podium, announced that its 47 legislators would resign in protest.

The vote marked a spectacular setback for 57-year-old Mr. Roh, a self-made human rights lawyer who took office last February on a populist ticket that promised South Koreans better relations with the communist North and a more equal footing with the country's biggest ally, the United States.

His 13-month tenure was dogged by corruption scandals. But Friday's vote was the peak of embarrassment for the feisty, independent leader. It was the first time South Korea's Parliament has impeached a president.

The Constitutional Court has 180 days to approve or reject Mr. Roh's ouster.

In a statement issued by Mr. Roh's presidential office, the administration said it would subject itself to "the judgment of history and the people" and hoped the court would "make a quick decision to minimize confusion in state affairs."

Chief Justice Yoon Young-chul could not say when hearings would begin. But he called the impeachment "a matter of grave consequence" and pledged to handle it "in a speedy and precise manner."

Mr. Goh, as the new acting head of state, told the Defence Ministry to heighten military vigilance along the inter-Korean border, where the North and South have kept thousands of troops since the end of the 1950-53 Korean War.

Tensions are running high amid the deepening international standoff over North Korea's nuclear weapons development, but the ministry said Friday it detected no unusual North Korean military movements.

The National Security Council acknowledged concerns that the upheaval "could invite danger to the nation's security situation," but issued a statement saying security and foreign affairs policies wouldn't change.

"The people feel unease because the impeachment bill was passed at a time that the economy faces difficulties," Mr. Goh said. "The cabinet and all government officials must do all they can to stabilize the people's lives and ensure that the country's international credibility will not be damaged."

Mr. Goh also issued a statement saying it was "deplorable that this kind of incident has happened," and that he "cannot but feel sorry to the nation that the situation has reached the point it has."

The opposition Grand National and Millennium Democratic parties cited three main reasons for the impeachment: Mr. Roh's violation of election laws, corruption scandals surrounding former aides and his alleged mismanagement of the world's 12th-largest economy.

South Korea's KOSPI stock index ended the trading day down 2.5 per cent, and the U.S. dollar surged nearly 1 per cent to 1,180 won. But Moody's Investor Service, a major credit rating agency, said the turmoil wouldn't affect its rating of South Korea.

"The impeachment will produce near-term political uncertainty, but does not affect the fundamental creditworthiness of Korea's sovereign ratings in Moody's opinion," said Moody's vice-president Thomas Byrne.

South Korea's economic growth rate slowed to 2.9 per cent last year, from 6.3 per cent in 2002. The government is aiming for five per cent growth this year, but poor domestic consumption and North Korea tensions are a burden.

Finance and Economy Minister Lee Hun-Jai tried to offer reassurance: "This crisis doesn't mean there is a problem with our economy. We have so far established an economic system that is resistant toward political upheavals."

Mr. Roh has not apologized for the flashpoint of the impeachment vote: accusations that he broke election laws by stumping for the Uri party in the campaign for the April 15 parliamentary election. He doesn't belong to the Uri party, but has said he wants to join.

The National Elections Commission ruled last week that Mr. Roh had engaged in illegal electioneering — but that the infraction was minor and didn't warrant criminal charges.

He also was hit by corruption scandals. In December, three former Roh aides were indicted on charges of collecting illicit funds from Samsung, LG and other big businesses for the December 2002 presidential campaign.

Mr. Roh has said his campaign was far cleaner than the opposition's. Prosecutors' investigations indicate the GNP amassed 84 billion won ($96 million Cdn) and that Roh's camp accepted 11 billion won ($12.5 million Cdn.)

Political analysts said policy may now take a backseat to politics in next month's election.

"I worry the nation may split into pro-impeachment and anti-impeachment factions," said Lee Jung-hee, a politics professor as Seoul's Hankuk University of Foreign Studies.

http://globeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20040312.wkorea0311/BNStory/Front/
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oh those nutty Koreans...
 
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OTIS

TRIBE Member
POPULIST LEADERS ARE NOT ALLOWED!!!

This is the leader that was brought in by a grassroots movement organized mostly on the internet which proved successful as South Korea is one of the most wired up countries in the world. Thus the election of him was unexpected and considered an upset to the powers that be as they never saw it coming. It was only a matter of time before big money gathered enough steam for an impeachement. Go team democracy. This shit has gotta end.
 

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by OTIS
POPULIST LEADERS ARE NOT ALLOWED!!!

This is the leader that was brought in by a grassroots movement organized mostly on the internet which proved successful as South Korea is one of the most wired up countries in the world. Thus the election of him was unexpected and considered an upset to the powers that be as they never saw it coming. It was only a matter of time before big money gathered enough steam for an impeachement. Go team democracy. This shit has gotta end.


yes his corruption had nothing to do with it.
 

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by OTIS
He shoulda just gotten a blowjob, it would have been easier.

or maybe not stolen a large percentage of the GNP...


The man was on the take and the people who elected him kicked him out.
 
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2canplay

TRIBE Member
Holy, at least learn to read Ditto..."a large percent of the GNP"???

Corrupt. Yeah, just as "corrupt" as the other party which received over 7 times the amount of "quasi-illegal" dough. How about, the powers that be, with tons of cash and tons of power behind them, have twisted the facts and tried to influence foreign public opinion who are mostly too lame to dig further into the story and will accept anything they hear as fact.

Because as Quimby said, "oh those nutty Korean's." I suppose that means...actually, I don't know what that means. Quimby, do you mind explaining what "oh, those nutty koreans" means?
 

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by 2canplay
Holy, at least learn to read Ditto..."a large percent of the GNP"???

Corrupt. Yeah, just as "corrupt" as the other party which received over 7 times the amount of "quasi-illegal" dough. How about, the powers that be, with tons of cash and tons of power behind them, have twisted the facts and tried to influence foreign public opinion who are mostly too lame to dig further into the story and will accept anything they hear as fact.

Because as Quimby said, "oh those nutty Korean's." I suppose that means...actually, I don't know what that means. Quimby, do you mind explaining what "oh, those nutty koreans" means?

Or maybe you have a pre determined belief that clouds your judgement and requires american involvement even when it isn't necessarily present.

Again show your facts, right nowe it looks like Quimby has and that its an intewrnal impeachment for corruption. Something that has dogged his administration since day one.

I'm not saying that you are wrong, just that I need more than opinion to make the same decisions. Back it up!!!
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Ditto Much
Or maybe you have a pre determined belief that clouds your judgement and requires american involvement even when it isn't necessarily present.

50,000 marines in South Korea and the massive greviences they're causing among the Korean public isn't enough indication of American Involvement/interest in the country?
 

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by OTIS
50,000 marines in South Korea and the massive greviences they're causing among the Korean public isn't enough indication of American Involvement?

In the impeachment.

hey there are 650,000 South Koprean soldiers who lose there jobs if the North and South unite. Seems to me they have there own reasons!!!
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Ditto Much
In the impeachment.

hey there are 650,000 South Koprean soldiers who lose there jobs if the North and South unite. Seems to me they have there own reasons!!!

Or the fact that drunken marines with nothing to do cause shit among the general public who their mostly southern US indoctrinated skulls don't blend well with. My friend teaches in Seoul, he provides me with nice stories. Like how they've gotten drunk and run over children after hopping into a vehicle.

It's put allot of pressure on the administration to do something about getting them out. And was part of the election platform of Mr. Impeachmed. Since NK was revealed as part of the (non) axis of eeeevil, they can't really have an administration that disagrees with them can they. You believe too much in the autonomy of nations that are friendly with the US. The fact is most of the capital in the country is US owned, if the marines leave, the capital leaves. Why? Because they are there to provide a stable environment for it. Certainly you can’t have a civilian leader who is any way threatening to such capital So you have to wonder what the motives are for the impeachment, and who is behind it. Don’t get me wrong, when I say American involvement, I mean American money.
 
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Vote Quimby

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by 2canplay
Because as Quimby said, "oh those nutty Korean's." I suppose that means...actually, I don't know what that means. Quimby, do you mind explaining what "oh, those nutty koreans" means?
See the part I highlighted in bold in the article.
 

2canplay

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Vote Quimby
See the part I highlighted in bold in the article.

So?

I don't get it. How do the two connect (ie. what you highlighted and calling Koreans nutty)?
 

2canplay

TRIBE Member
Ditto, unfortunately I don't have much info on what is going on in S. Korea at this present moment. However, I'd be very cautious about prematurely labelling a democratically-elected leader corrupt, especially when he is a "populist," which to me, indicates he represents the popular opinion of the people, and therefore NOT tied to those who have "INTERESTS." 'Interests' usually guide all Western governments, and therefore, the people's wants/opinions may become subordinated by the power of those interests.

OTIS suggests the interests lie in the military-industrial establishment in Korea, backstopped by American capital. You even elude to the military interests, which stand to lose in a united Korea. I agree with both positions (although America's interests are more political than financial, because America does not have that much money invested in S. Korea - they're more political because the Korean pininsula is wrapped up in the larger financial interests and ideological perspectives which surround CHINA - everything in the Pacific is about China, it has been for 100 years.).

A united Korea threatens alot of interests...that's what it comes down to. For the same reason Kissinger undermined LBJ's peace talks in Vietnam in 1968, private interests often have very powerful forces behind them which usurp the public's own wants/wishes.

Considering that the article mentioned that the violations were not serious, and considering the above thoughts, I have trouble subscribing to the corrupt politician theory. Too many things point somewhere else, especially when you look at S.Korea's importance in American Foriegn policy over the last 54 years.
 

Vote Quimby

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by 2canplay
So?

I don't get it. How do the two connect (ie. what you highlighted and calling Koreans nutty)?
I've always kind of thought that people who set themselves on fire or try to drive their car into a building somewhat nutty.
 

2canplay

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Vote Quimby
I've always kind of thought that people who set themselves on fire or try to drive their car into a building somewhat nutty.

So, do all Koreans set themselves on fire or try to drive their car into buildings? Because, you are strongly inferring that you believe that all Koreans are nutty because they all drive their cars into buildings and set themselves on fire.

So, did you mean to say, "what a couple of nutty Koreans"?

If so, why did you not say it that way? Perhaps I'm wrong, please explain.
 
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Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by 2canplay
So, do all Koreans set themselves on fire or try to drive their car into buildings? Because, you are strongly inferring that you believe that all Koreans are nutty because they all drive their cars into buildings and set themselves on fire.

So, did you mean to say, "what a couple of nutty Koreans"?

If so, why did you not say it that way? Perhaps I'm wrong, please explain.

Okay dude, seriously I got it, its bolded and highlighted. I really honestly don't think it was meant as a racial slur in any way.

0.02
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Ditto Much
Okay dude, seriously I got it, its bolded and highlighted. I really honestly don't think it was meant as a racial slur in any way.

0.02

No, but I think the comment is being interpreted as offensive in a different way as it undermines the obvious explanation that those who are resorting to such acts of desperation are feeling legitimately desperate about their situation.

VQ did you find it nutty when the Korean farmer stabbed himself to death with a pocket Knife at the Cancun WTO protest? Was he just part of the nutty Korean camp?
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by silver1
It's like watching a Japanese gameshow and saying, "Ah those whacky Japanese".

Right! Like that weird one that's all dubbed over in english! I love that show. But I forgot to tape the episode where the contestants lit themselves on fire in protest. Got it handy?
 
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2canplay

TRIBE Member
Furthermore, I wouldn't have said anything if this was in the general forum. We are in politics. Quimby posts an article about a serious affair in world politics and then he ends with, what looks to be, a racial slur. So, WTF was his point, why did he post the article?? For the two highlighted lines? If so, then Quimby should post that kind of 'observation' in the general forum.
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
I don't think it's a racial slur in it's truest sense.. it's just indicative of a lack of understanding he may have of South Koreans. Besides. Everyone knows from those english dubbed gameshows that Koreans & Japanese are one and the same.
 

AdRiaN

TRIBE Member
2canplay -- Here's what you wrote in an earlier thread about anti-bush commercials being aired during the Super Bowl:

You guys are all getting worked up over nothing. Even if (A Big IF) they did manage to get it on air, how many of the 100 million people who watch actually get it? Not too many.

This is America after all...the dumber the better.

You made a generalization about 300 million people. VQ only made a generalization about 50 million. :)
 

2canplay

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by AdRiaN
2canplay -- Here's what you wrote in an earlier thread about anti-bush commercials being aired during the Super Bowl:



You made a generalization about 300 million people. VQ only made a generalization about 50 million. :)

I figured someone would have enough time on their hands to scower (sp?) back through my posts, I just figured that that someone would be Quimby, not his boot licker.

;)

Context my friend, context.
 
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