• Hi Guest: Welcome to TRIBE, the online home of TRIBE MAGAZINE. If you'd like to post here, or reply to existing posts on TRIBE, you first have to register. Join us!

So I finally installed Gentoo...

djfear

TRIBE Member
I finally decided to get back on linux and I must say Gentoo has been quite the learning experience. I've learned more installing Gentoo than I have with running Debian, and it's been quite the ride.

Then again, I'm only talking about the kernel and initial install. I have no GUI, no xorg, no nVidia driver (that's currently being emerged, seems to be taking longer than the initial kernel install though!), and networking didn't seem to work, although I have a nagging feeling it's my bloody router... :confused:

Anyway, took about a day to try installing it, first time failed (bootloader wasn't installed properly), then the second day I did it right, but my screen doesn't initialize properly in the beginning, now I just have the normal command line.

I have a feeling that I'll be going back to a lot of stuff and changing the configs and maybe recompiling the kernel again, but the good thing is that I won't have to be reformatting like in windows and losing all my settings, which is a bonus. I definitely like the way in linux everything is open - I'm talking about the configurations, and all the options specifically.

So far I haven't asked anyone for any help, I've just been getting by on the documentation alone. Seems fairly simple but time consuming since I have to keep switching to the live CD and back. It would have been helpful if I had a laptop laying around that I could use to read the docs (they are too many to print).

So the question I have is, have I just scratched the surface or am I half way there (in having this thing fully installed)? It seems that even though the kernel is installed and the majority of the back end things are working (minus the network, sound, video, and maybe some usb stuff), I still have to go about and get the gui up and running, and all the other applications, like a dvd writer, newsgroup binary program, etc. Or will all of that stuff come a lot easier once I get more comfortable with just emerging everything and what not?

There are still some fundamental things that I'm not sure about though, like I follow the instructions to the t but I'm not exactly sure what certain things do, although I'm assuming I'll learn as I go along...yeah, more like a rant/random post than anything.

Carry on. :eek:
 

mattt416

TRIBE Member
djfear said:
I finally decided to get back on linux and I must say Gentoo has been quite the learning experience. I've learned more installing Gentoo than I have with running Debian, and it's been quite the ride.

Then again, I'm only talking about the kernel and initial install. I have no GUI, no xorg, no nVidia driver (that's currently being emerged, seems to be taking longer than the initial kernel install though!), and networking didn't seem to work, although I have a nagging feeling it's my bloody router... :confused:

Anyway, took about a day to try installing it, first time failed (bootloader wasn't installed properly), then the second day I did it right, but my screen doesn't initialize properly in the beginning, now I just have the normal command line.

I have a feeling that I'll be going back to a lot of stuff and changing the configs and maybe recompiling the kernel again, but the good thing is that I won't have to be reformatting like in windows and losing all my settings, which is a bonus. I definitely like the way in linux everything is open - I'm talking about the configurations, and all the options specifically.

So far I haven't asked anyone for any help, I've just been getting by on the documentation alone. Seems fairly simple but time consuming since I have to keep switching to the live CD and back. It would have been helpful if I had a laptop laying around that I could use to read the docs (they are too many to print).

So the question I have is, have I just scratched the surface or am I half way there (in having this thing fully installed)? It seems that even though the kernel is installed and the majority of the back end things are working (minus the network, sound, video, and maybe some usb stuff), I still have to go about and get the gui up and running, and all the other applications, like a dvd writer, newsgroup binary program, etc. Or will all of that stuff come a lot easier once I get more comfortable with just emerging everything and what not?

There are still some fundamental things that I'm not sure about though, like I follow the instructions to the t but I'm not exactly sure what certain things do, although I'm assuming I'll learn as I go along...yeah, more like a rant/random post than anything.

Carry on. :eek:
cool! i used gentoo for a bit a while back, then ditched it. i got bored having to constantly battle with new config files and waiting around for programs to build. for some reason i downloaded the 2006.0 install cd yesterday and did a stage3 install. i've got pretty much everything up and running -- xorg-x11, fluxbox, xchat-2, gaim, xmms, eterm, etc. no kde / gnome for me, i just couldn't be arsed waiting for that to build. as for the kernel, i just use genkernel to get a kernel that has pretty much everything enabled. though i did have to rebuild the kernel (using genkernel) when i enabled alsa support. gentoo is fun, though i'll see how long it lasts for. :)
 

CiG

TRIBE Member
Depending on which window manager you decide to emerge it will take a very long time...

KDE takes a while I know that...

---

Instlaling gentoo is like going through a small course...
 

djfear

TRIBE Member
Just so you know, from time restrictions, I haven't moved ahead anywhere. Internet is still not working properly.

Could someone give me a quick run down on how to install eth0 properly, say from the beginning (from the liveCD)?

ifconfig -a shows that eth0 isn't even there. :(

Also my /etc/modules.autoload.d/kernel-2.6 doesn't have anything in it...

I installed my nVidia driver (I think, it's not configured properly but it fucking compiled for about an hour, so it's there somewhere), but yeah, nothing really works.

When I boot up the drive the graphics are messed up but I can manage to press control-d and then after some more scrolling of text it appears and I'm in good ol' 640x400 command line mode. At that point I can log into root and do things, but the internet isn't configured properly so I'm shit out of luck. :/
 
tribe cannabis goldsmith - gold cannabis accessories

~atp~

TRIBE Member
djfear,

do you have lspci installed? The general steps are:

1. Identify your hardware.
2. Install the kernel modules or build them into your kernel. I do *not* recommend using genkernel btw. It basically sucks as an abstraction tool.
3. load module (or reboot with new kernel).
4. Modify /etc/conf.d/net or manually update your ethernet device using ifconfig.

I can be more explicit if you'd like. :)

btw, the package you want to emerge for lspci is "pciutils".
 

djfear

TRIBE Member
~atp~ said:
djfear,

do you have lspci installed? The general steps are:

1. Identify your hardware.
2. Install the kernel modules or build them into your kernel. I do *not* recommend using genkernel btw. It basically sucks as an abstraction tool.
3. load module (or reboot with new kernel).
4. Modify /etc/conf.d/net or manually update your ethernet device using ifconfig.

I can be more explicit if you'd like. :)

btw, the package you want to emerge for lspci is "pciutils".
This board doesn't seem to like the links (command line) browser.

Anyway...

1. I'm using my motherboard's ethernet port - nVidia nForce Networking Controller
2. I don't know how to do this precisely.
3. I assume the command for this is "module module_name" although I don't know what the module_name should be, whether it should be dhcp, dhcpcd, eth0 or whatever.
4. I'm not sure what to add to the /etc/conf.d/net file.

I also have emerged pciutils I think, but I just tried running it and it didn't work.

Alright, here's what I have in the following files:

/etc/conf.d/hostname
HOSTNAME="hostname"

/etc/conf.d/domainname
DNSDOMAIN="homenetwork"

/etc/hosts
127.0.0.1 localhost
192.168.0.100 hostname.homenetwork hostname #This is my machine
#192.168.0.102 ???.homenetwork ??? #this is a WinXP computer upstairs, I don't remember the computer id.

/etc/conf.d/net
#empty
#should I have:
#config_eth0=( "dhcp" )
#dhcp_eth0="nodns nontp nonis"
#?

I also emerged dhcpcd at one point.

But eth0 is not found with ifconfig -a and there seems to be no trace of it running, so yes, I would very much appreciate if you were a little more precise. :)

I'm also behind a router if that changes anything.
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
I would have answered sooner but I've been busy putting out fires at work.

I'm going to start back at step 1:

~atp~ said:
1. Identify your hardware.
You said:

djfear said:
I also have emerged pciutils I think, but I just tried running it and it didn't work.
You have to throw me a bigger bone! :) First, tell me exactly what the output of "lspci" is by pasting it in a response window. Here's my output:

Code:
root@nexus linux # lspci
00:00.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation 440BX/ZX/DX - 82443BX/ZX/DX Host bridge (rev 03)
00:01.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 440BX/ZX/DX - 82443BX/ZX/DX AGP bridge (rev 03)
00:07.0 ISA bridge: Intel Corporation 82371AB/EB/MB PIIX4 ISA (rev 02)
00:07.1 IDE interface: Intel Corporation 82371AB/EB/MB PIIX4 IDE (rev 01)
00:07.2 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82371AB/EB/MB PIIX4 USB (rev 01)
00:07.3 Bridge: Intel Corporation 82371AB/EB/MB PIIX4 ACPI (rev 02)
00:0f.0 PCI bridge: Digital Equipment Corporation DECchip 21152 (rev 03)
00:11.0 Ethernet controller: 3Com Corporation 3c905B 100BaseTX [Cyclone] (rev 24)
01:00.0 VGA compatible controller: ATI Technologies Inc 3D Rage Pro AGP 1X/2X (rev 5c)
If you look, you'll see I have a PCI device at 00:11.0 for my ethernet card. I use that information to select the appropriate module when building the kernel.

The command for loading a module is not "module module_name", but we'll get to that after you've given me the output from lspci. ;)

-k
 

djfear

TRIBE Member
~atp~ said:
I would have answered sooner but I've been busy putting out fires at work.

I'm going to start back at step 1:


You said:


You have to throw me a bigger bone! :) First, tell me exactly what the output of "lspci" is by pasting it in a response window. Here's my output:

Code:
root@nexus linux # lspci
00:00.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation 440BX/ZX/DX - 82443BX/ZX/DX Host bridge (rev 03)
00:01.0 PCI bridge: Intel Corporation 440BX/ZX/DX - 82443BX/ZX/DX AGP bridge (rev 03)
00:07.0 ISA bridge: Intel Corporation 82371AB/EB/MB PIIX4 ISA (rev 02)
00:07.1 IDE interface: Intel Corporation 82371AB/EB/MB PIIX4 IDE (rev 01)
00:07.2 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82371AB/EB/MB PIIX4 USB (rev 01)
00:07.3 Bridge: Intel Corporation 82371AB/EB/MB PIIX4 ACPI (rev 02)
00:0f.0 PCI bridge: Digital Equipment Corporation DECchip 21152 (rev 03)
00:11.0 Ethernet controller: 3Com Corporation 3c905B 100BaseTX [Cyclone] (rev 24)
01:00.0 VGA compatible controller: ATI Technologies Inc 3D Rage Pro AGP 1X/2X (rev 5c)
If you look, you'll see I have a PCI device at 00:11.0 for my ethernet card. I use that information to select the appropriate module when building the kernel.

The command for loading a module is not "module module_name", but we'll get to that after you've given me the output from lspci. ;)

-k
It's a little more complicated than that actually. Alright, first, to output a file I'm assuming I type in:

"lspci > filename" or "lcpci >> filename"

second, I can't post on here while using the LiveCD since Tribe.ca is not friendly to the links browser anymore (you can't log in). We can always be a little more theoretical although if I really wanted I could somehow post the information here but it would probably amount to something like outputting lspci to a file, then emailing that file to myself (if I can even use attachments in gmail), then using Windows I can finally paste the code. I can do this, but unfortunately not today, tomorrow definitely.

As for now I'll give you what Windows tells me:
Network Adapters:
- 1394 Net Adapter
- MAC Bridge Miniport
- Marvell Ukon 88E8053 PCI-E Gigabit Ethernet Controller
- Motorola SURFboard SB5100 USB Cable Modem (this is the "Rogers Extreme" modem)
- NVIDIA nForce Networking Controller <-- my ethernet controller that I'm using, so this is what we're looking for.

I'm not using too much hardware by the way, just my MSI P4N motherboard, and a 6600GT nVidia video card. Everything else (sound, internet) is from the mobo.

I tried running the following:

cd /etc/init.d
ln -s net.lo net.eth0 <-- this command runs when I chroot from the liveCD, but not when I run it from root from a regular boot up.
rc-update add net.eth0 default <-- says it's already running at run level.
/etc/init.d/net.eth0 start <-- doesn't work.
rc <-- this tells me the following:

eth0 was not found.

Anyway, if you want to wait for tomorrow then that's okay, but if you want to just show me an example of how to install it then I can always try that on my own. Time to sleep.

- djfear

P.S. while in the LiveCD environment I decided to emerge links (the browser) and man...that shit took 3 hours! Ended up installing 29 different packages (links was the very last one). :(
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
I'm extremely confused. :)

Why can't you just type "lspci" and hit enter?

If you are having troubles in your newly-installed environment, why don't you fire back up the live CD and run "lspci" from there? Then, write down the information, and come back here and post the information. I think it's straightforward.

Just for fun, I took a peek around in the kconfig files and then loaded up the kernel configuration on my box, and discovered this tasty treat for you:

Code:
 Symbol: FORCEDETH [=n]                                                  │
  │ Prompt: Reverse Engineered nForce Ethernet support (EXPERIMENTAL)       │
  │   Defined at drivers/net/Kconfig:1362                                   │
  │   Depends on: NETDEVICES && !UML && NET_PCI && PCI && EXPERIMENTAL      │
  │   Location:                                                             │
  │     -> Device Drivers                                                   │
  │       -> Network device support                                         │
  │         -> Network device support (NETDEVICES [=y])                     │
  │           -> Ethernet (10 or 100Mbit)                                   │
  │             -> EISA, VLB, PCI and on board controllers (NET_PCI [=y])   │
I took a peek around on the net, and this is probably what you want. I would highly recommend recompiling your kernel with this option enabled as either a module or built-in (hint: do it built-in).

Also, djfear, I'm driving home this point about the module because that IS your problem. I can't stress this enough! Stop trying to fuck around with init.d, because init.d is dumb and it won't do anything for you. :D

Get the module built (step 1) and I think you'll find yourself in a happy place.
 
tribe cannabis goldsmith - gold cannabis accessories

~atp~

TRIBE Member
djfear said:
P.S. while in the LiveCD environment I decided to emerge links (the browser) and man...that shit took 3 hours! Ended up installing 29 different packages (links was the very last one). :(
I think you need to take a look at your USE flags. Also, when you build a new system, a lot of core libs haven't been built. You'll find that less and less extraneous packages need to be built as time goes on.
 

djfear

TRIBE Member
~atp~ said:
I think you need to take a look at your USE flags. Also, when you build a new system, a lot of core libs haven't been built. You'll find that less and less extraneous packages need to be built as time goes on.
Haha, ah yes, that's what they're for (the USE flags). I'll take a look at 'em at work today.

I looked at those two modules today actually:
Code:
EISA, VLB, PCI and on board controllers (NET_PCI [=y])
Reverse Engineered nForce Ethernet support (EXPERIMENTAL)
When I recompile them in my kernel (using the live CD at this point), are these the commands I'm supposed to put in? Am I missing anything?

Code:
mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo
mount /dev/hda1 /mnt/gentoo/boot
swapon /dev/hda2
mount -t proc none /mnt/gentoo/proc
chroot /mnt/gentoo /bin/bash
env-update && source /etc/profile
cd /usr/src/linux
make menuconfig

*do the changes*

make && make modules_install
cp arch/i386/boot/bzImage /boot/<kernel name>
exit
umount /mnt/gentoo/proc /mnt/gentoo/boot /mnt/gentoo
reboot
 

djfear

TRIBE Member
~atp~ said:
I'm extremely confused. :)

Why can't you just type "lspci" and hit enter?

If you are having troubles in your newly-installed environment, why don't you fire back up the live CD and run "lspci" from there? Then, write down the information, and come back here and post the information. I think it's straightforward.
It is that straight forward but at the time I figured you wanted the entire output, and not maybe 1-2 lines (i.e. the hardware in question). In that case I was too lazy to write it out by hand. :p

Anyway, back at 6pm...
 

Hypnotoad

TRIBE Member
djfear said:
Haha, ah yes, that's what they're for (the USE flags). I'll take a look at 'em at work today.

I looked at those two modules today actually:
Code:
EISA, VLB, PCI and on board controllers (NET_PCI [=y])
Reverse Engineered nForce Ethernet support (EXPERIMENTAL)
When I recompile them in my kernel (using the live CD at this point), are these the commands I'm supposed to put in? Am I missing anything?

Code:
mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo
mount /dev/hda1 /mnt/gentoo/boot
swapon /dev/hda2
mount -t proc none /mnt/gentoo/proc
chroot /mnt/gentoo /bin/bash
env-update && source /etc/profile
cd /usr/src/linux
make menuconfig

*do the changes*

make && make modules_install
cp arch/i386/boot/bzImage /boot/<kernel name>
exit
umount /mnt/gentoo/proc /mnt/gentoo/boot /mnt/gentoo
reboot
After make modules_install, do 'make install' It copies over the bzimage, makes symlinks and other magic for you as there is more to copy to /boot than just the kernel image. Just make sure that your grub.conf is trying to use the kernel at /boot/vmlinuz and you are set.

The command for loading a module is 'modprobe module_name" It will look in /lib/modules/kernel-version/ for a module with that name. Note however, that you should just use the generic name for the kernel, not the full name. So instead of e100.ko, just type e100.
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
djfear, as Hypnotoad mentioned, running the "install" target is important for modules. However, it sounds like you compiled the driver into your kernel. In that case, the "install" target isn't quite as necessary, but what you will need to do is copy the /usr/src/linux/arch/i386/boot/bzImage file into your mounted /boot directory (I would create a backup of the old one too). Depending on whether you use grub or lilo, you will want to add a new menu option for yourself.

When you boot into the new kernel, you can just type "dmesg" and grep (or visually scan) for the relevant bits that will indicate success or failure. Obviously, the true test is just testing the availability of "eth0".
 
tribe cannabis goldsmith - gold cannabis accessories

djfear

TRIBE Member
So I'm posting this from my gentoo environment, which means that it worked! :D Found a way to login with links as well.

Currently at 640x400 but at least now I can start working on my nVidia driver and then X and then a gui. But at least now it's a lot easier to do stuff.

As for how I did it, well atp you were right, the modules were not installed in the first place. So I went in and chose them, did "make && make modules_install", copied that to /boot/kernelname exited, unmounted, rebooted, and boom - it works.

- djfear
 

Hypnotoad

TRIBE Member
djfear said:
So I'm posting this from my gentoo environment, which means that it worked! :D Found a way to login with links as well.

Currently at 640x400 but at least now I can start working on my nVidia driver and then X and then a gui. But at least now it's a lot easier to do stuff.

As for how I did it, well atp you were right, the modules were not installed in the first place. So I went in and chose them, did "make && make modules_install", copied that to /boot/kernelname exited, unmounted, rebooted, and boom - it works.

- djfear
If you have Xorg installed already, why not just use the nvidia linux driver from nvidia.com? It's a very easy install, it just makes a module, installs it in the correct location, and then you just have to modprobe it.
 

djfear

TRIBE Member
So what are some good windows managers? I just decided to go with fluxbox for fun.

Is there a way to log into a computer remotely from work (say a work environment that you're not an administrator in)?
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
Yeah, I use fluxbox because I don't like a WM that gets in the way of my work. If I want a KDE application, I build it and run the application without all the BS the KDE WM brings with it.

You can definitely log in remotely, you will, however, have to re-enable the TCP socket listener for your X server (it is disabled for good fucking reason by default). Once you have the listener going, you can connect to an X session remotely from another X machine, or you can run a VNC server on your linux box, which is usually the better option because then you can log in via a web browser, regardless of the platform.
 

djfear

TRIBE Member
~atp~ said:
Yeah, I use fluxbox because I don't like a WM that gets in the way of my work. If I want a KDE application, I build it and run the application without all the BS the KDE WM brings with it.

You can definitely log in remotely, you will, however, have to re-enable the TCP socket listener for your X server (it is disabled for good fucking reason by default). Once you have the listener going, you can connect to an X session remotely from another X machine, or you can run a VNC server on your linux box, which is usually the better option because then you can log in via a web browser, regardless of the platform.
Web browser would be the better option, but I suppose I won't be doing this anytime soon.

I'm really liking Gentoo even though it's still not completely setup (haha, it's taking forever but I can't stand compiling every free moment I get). I've realized I've done some bad things though, like I haven't investigated and used the USE flags properly, which has lead to longer compile times. Maybe eventually I'll go back and recompile some applications as I go along but at this point I just want to get a system up and running that I can browse the 'net, and play music and videos in (for now).
 
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders

djfear

TRIBE Member
Almost there! *sigh*...

I'm in twm although it seems like I'm in a virtual desktop as opposed to a regular one (i.e. the screen is 1600x1200 but the resolution's at 640x480@60hz:0 ).

Mouse still doesn't work (usb mouse, logitech 2 button plus click wheel), and I can't seem to find ~/.fluxbox/ :confused:

Hopefully I'll have all those problems fixed when I come back here. :p

By the way ~atp~ and Hypnotoad, thanks a lot for helping me out!!! You're both :cool: in my books.
 

djfear

TRIBE Member
djfear said:
Almost there! *sigh*...

I'm in twm although it seems like I'm in a virtual desktop as opposed to a regular one (i.e. the screen is 1600x1200 but the resolution's at 640x480@60hz:0 ).

Mouse still doesn't work (usb mouse, logitech 2 button plus click wheel), and I can't seem to find ~/.fluxbox/ :confused:

Hopefully I'll have all those problems fixed when I come back here. :p

By the way ~atp~ and Hypnotoad, thanks a lot for helping me out!!! You're both :cool: in my books.
1600x1200 resolution - check (although not sure about refresh rate!)
Xorg running properly - check
ethernet - check
sound - still gotta work on it
fluxbox - installed but not running (twm is currently being loaded)
grub login resolution is fucked up
mouse scroll wheel does not work.
...still a ways to go but at least the engine is running. :p
 

Hypnotoad

TRIBE Member
djfear said:
1600x1200 resolution - check (although not sure about refresh rate!)
Xorg running properly - check
ethernet - check
sound - still gotta work on it
fluxbox - installed but not running (twm is currently being loaded)
grub login resolution is fucked up
mouse scroll wheel does not work.
...still a ways to go but at least the engine is running. :p
For your mouse, assuming you figured out the USB and /dev/input/mice thing correctly, you need to add ZAxisMapping 4 5, or something like that. I can't remember the exact syntax, sorry. I suggest googling for "xorg click wheel howto" or something like that.

Not sure why there would be GRUB login resolution, since GRUB is the boot loader. Which display manager are you using? GDM(gnome) or XDM? That will also help you get it to load fluxbox when you login instead of twm.
 

djfear

TRIBE Member
Hypnotoad said:
For your mouse, assuming you figured out the USB and /dev/input/mice thing correctly, you need to add ZAxisMapping 4 5, or something like that. I can't remember the exact syntax, sorry. I suggest googling for "xorg click wheel howto" or something like that.

Not sure why there would be GRUB login resolution, since GRUB is the boot loader. Which display manager are you using? GDM(gnome) or XDM? That will also help you get it to load fluxbox when you login instead of twm.
I got my mouse working with the ps2 connection but not the usb connection. :confused: Worst thing is, in Windows my scroll wheel doesn't work in ps2 mode (I'd have to go get that logitech hack) so it's annoying to say the least.

Let's see if Friday night drunkeness can solve this problem. :p
 

Hypnotoad

TRIBE Member
djfear said:
I got my mouse working with the ps2 connection but not the usb connection. :confused: Worst thing is, in Windows my scroll wheel doesn't work in ps2 mode (I'd have to go get that logitech hack) so it's annoying to say the least.

Let's see if Friday night drunkeness can solve this problem. :p
Using either PS/2 or USB, the ZAxisMapping option should work.

To get the mouse to work as a USB device, you need to make sure that you have the correct host controller driver, most likely EHCI for USB 2.0 or UCHI for intel based chipsets using USB 1.0. Then you need USB HID(human interface device) support, and you can add it all or just mouse/keyboard.

If you have done that correctly, after you reboot your PC, you should be able to see a message in dmesg about USB controller detected and a USB device, followed by information on your mouse. From there, you would just need to change your X config to use the new mouse device rather than /dev/psaux.

Not always so easy, but Gentoo wasn't necessarily built around ease of use I think. :)
 
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders
Top