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smoking crack?

scruffy1

TRIBE Member
Seriously, this guy must be smoking crack if he actually believes that the Big 3, and the UAW, are not to blame for their own demise.

It's well accepted that while Toyota, Honda and other manufacturers made better, more fuel-efficient cars that the Big 3 continued to pump out low-quality 'Cavaliers' and gas guzzling, profit padding SUV's.

And to think that our Conservative Government actually wants to give these people some of our hard earned tax dollars sickens me.




(from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/11/16/auto-workers-union-rules_n_144220.html)



With the House of Representatives pledging an aid package for the auto industry, the United Auto Workers (UWA) union fanned the flames a bit by refusing to grant any concessions in a bailout of the big 3 Detroit automakers. UAW president Ron Gettelfinger adamantly stated that the auto industry's woes could be laid at the feet of the stumbling U.S. economy overall:

The US United Auto Workers (UAW) union has ruled out concessions - at least for the time being - to help rescue the ailing Detroit-based car industry.

Ron Gettelfinger, the union president, said at the weekend that "the focus has to be on the economy as a whole as opposed to a UAW contract"...

..."We're here not because of what the auto industry has done", Mr Gettelfinger said during a rare press conference. "We're here because of what has happened to the economy." The union represents blue-collar workers at assembly plants, as well as several parts suppliers.

High labour costs are seen by many outside the UAW as part of the reason for the carmakers' distress. UAW members' generous pay and benefits have gained them a reputation as the aristocracy of the US labour movement. Much of GM's debt was taken on in the early part of the decade to finance its blue-collar pension plan.
 

praktik

TRIBE Member
Well let's not reduce a complex situation to a one or only a few factors. UAW president will look out for the interests of his workers and will portray things with that in mind. Criticizing him for that is like criticizing Harper for talking up how great the Conservative party is.

Sure labour costs are high - but its not as if the American consumer is confident enough to make big ticket purchases, and if they were, where'd they get the credit?

UAW dude has a point and so do the people saying labour costs are a factor in the Motor City Meltdown. In the real world, they both can be right.
 

Flashy_McFlash

Well-Known TRIBEr
I would think he'd be able to get something purer than crack. Why bother being the head of UAW if you can't even get the good drugs?
 

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
You know what's really weird? Getting a call on a Friday night from a work colleage and mentor and having them ask if you know where they can score some rock.
 

AdRiaN

TRIBE Member
I'll bet it was even more weird when you told him exactly where to find it, right down to the colour of hoodie worn by the guy at Dundas and Sherbourne.
 

scruffy1

TRIBE Member
praktik said:
Well let's not reduce a complex situation to a one or only a few factors. UAW president will look out for the interests of his workers and will portray things with that in mind. Criticizing him for that is like criticizing Harper for talking up how great the Conservative party is.

Sure labour costs are high - but its not as if the American consumer is confident enough to make big ticket purchases, and if they were, where'd they get the credit?

UAW dude has a point and so do the people saying labour costs are a factor in the Motor City Meltdown. In the real world, they both can be right.

At the end of the day though, the troubles that the Big 3 are facing are a result of their own lack of foresight. They argue that the fundamentals changed over night. They didn't. The price of gas didn't suddenly double, it's been creeping up ever since I started driving more than 10 years ago. What did happen though is that these manufacturers chose to ignore the facts and instead focused solely on profits.

The workers reaped the rewards of building these gas guzzling SUV's. Instead of demanding that the company develop a car for the future they were more interested in getting a better benefits plan. Now, they turn around, throw their hands in the air and say it isn't their fault. Who's fault is it? Mine?

Other manufacturers, namely Toyota, are not laying off their workers nor or they clamouring for a bailout. In fact they are gaining market share and bringing new and innovative vehicles to market. Surprisingly, consumers are rewarding this by buying Toyota vehicles.

The argument that the auto industry (read: Big 3) isn't to blame is a joke. Who else can you blame for their decision to make an inferior product for decades and to sell gas guzzling SUV's? And more importantly, why should my tax dollars be used to save companies that can't save themselves? It's not like GM hasn't been asked and told for the better part of this decade to build better, more fuel efficient cars.

I thought we lived in a free-market where innovation, not retardation, was rewarded.

I'm curious, when the 'horseless carriages' first arrived, did governments bail out the carriage makers?
 

scruffy1

TRIBE Member
AdRiaN said:
I'll bet it was even more weird when you told him exactly where to find it, right down to the colour of hoodie worn by the guy at Dundas and Sherbourne.
you know that guy too?

:cool:
 

Flashy_McFlash

Well-Known TRIBEr
He's not saying that the Big 3 aren't to blame scruffy, he's saying that no one person or entity is to blame and it's not that simple a problem. Certainly the car companies have to shoulder a large share of the blame, but you can't honestly argue that the state of the economy has nothing to do with this.

BTW - Toyota and Honda and the rest are still suffering, though nowhere near the levels that the American auto makers are. Consumers are still loath to pony up that much cash in this economic climate.
 

Jeffsus

TRIBE Member
On a related note, the term "Big 3" is passee in the industry and has been replaced by "Detroit 3".

-jM
A&D
 

spaboy

TRIBE Member
Flashy_McFlash said:
He's not saying that the Big 3 aren't to blame scruffy, he's saying that no one person or entity is to blame and it's not that simple a problem.
It is simple & there is one entity to blame. Upper management at these companies. Their lack of ability to forecast has put them in this position. Are the auto makers the only ones suffering from economic pressures? Of course not. How bout we bail out every shit dick company out there with bad management while we're at it.
 

SUNKIST

TRIBE Member
i used to date a guy who smoked crack. and i used to date a guy who sold crack. and they both stole money from me. go figure.
 

AdRiaN

TRIBE Member
You need to be more selective in the future ... like maybe find a nice enterprising young man who manufactures crack.

Retail is for suckaz.
 

defazman

TRIBE Member
just another sign that the tribe demographic is aging. Even the threads titled about drugs are really about the large social economic topics.
 
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