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Six Alarm Fire @ Mattress Factory Near Dufferin/Eglinton

acheron

TRIBE Member
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That's kind of .... big.

LIVE1: Toronto warehouse up in smoke | CP24.com
 
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mingster

TRIBE Member
I saw this big cloud of smoke while I was walking home with the kids today around noon. The first thing I thought about was the Sunrise explosion. Same area. The concentration of factories and industrial business mixed with residential in the whole Dufferin/Caledonia corridor is pretty scary.
 

Spinsah

TRIBE Member
The concentration of factories and industrial business mixed with residential in the whole Dufferin/Caledonia corridor is pretty scary.
For context, your kids are far more likely to die in a fire due to factors in your own household (smoke detectors, gas, other negligence) then they are due to proximity to industry. The actual dangers of being close to industry are extremely limited today. When emissions were a major factor in the early part of last century, whole swathes of cities were divided into rich and poor by the wind patterns. Even notice how eastern parts of North American cities are normally less affluent then their western counterparts? That's why!

A major misstep in mid-century urban planning was zoning that separated land uses into distinct and isolated sections depending if they were commercial, industrial or residential. This led to a reliance on the automobile with all the attendant social, environmental and medical problems associated with it. Now, our most vibrant, in demand neighbourhoods are (once again) those that have mixed uses.
 
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mingster

TRIBE Member
For context, your kids are far more likely to die in a fire due to factors in your own household (smoke detectors, gas, other negligence) then they are due to proximity to industry. The actual dangers of being close to industry are extremely limited today. When emissions were a major factor in the early part of last century, whole swathes of cities were divided into rich and poor by the wind patterns. Even notice how eastern parts of North American cities are normally less affluent then their western counterparts? That's why!

whoa! why you gotta bring my kids into it?

you're probably right regarding the likeliness of one thing happening over the other, I don't know the numbers. but living just south of today's fire location, and seeing the smoke cloud in the sky while I was out walking around with my kids made me think of how many factories, and other buildings that house dangerous materials, are in the area, with housing all around. some of them are ticking time bombs, disasters waiting to happen. sorry if that sounds dramatic, but it's certainly the case with the sunrise explosion.

I'm not suggesting there should be a change in zoning or anything, but it does make one see the landscape around them in a different way.
 
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acheron

TRIBE Member
heck even in residential neighbourhoods, even brand new subdivisions, gas explosions are just as possible as these industrial accidents. Transformer fires too.

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Point being it really doesn't matter where you are. Accidents will happen.
 

Spinsah

TRIBE Member
whoa! why you gotta bring my kids into it?
Because that's a big part of what prompted your reaction, isn't it? You're out with them and your proximity to perceived danger caused you to question the safety of your built environment? It's a natural reaction.

But it's the same reaction that has so many less kids walking to school these days. There's a perception that that the world and urban environments specifically are more dangerous today. But they're not. Statistically, Toronto and most North American cities are safer now then they were a few decades ago.

I live in a community that is overrun with young children, and when some activists started knocking on doors and informing people that GE was processing uranium across the street, even though they had been doing so for decades, there was a panic. Of course, cooler heads prevailed, and in this case there's a public agency that can measure and remind folks that they absorb more radiation from a passing plane, then they do from this plant. But tapping into that anxiety is all too easy, especially when there's kids involved. Making the case of the importance of mixed uses and mixed incomes has traditionally been a hard sell, especially to young families, but all evidence points to a healthier environment when these principals are maintained and protected.

Sorry for the digression.
 
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peko

TRIBE Member
whoa! why you gotta bring my kids into it?

you're probably right regarding the likeliness of one thing happening over the other, I don't know the numbers. but living just south of today's fire location, and seeing the smoke cloud in the sky while I was out walking around with my kids made me think of how many factories, and other buildings that house dangerous materials, are in the area, with housing all around. some of them are ticking time bombs, disasters waiting to happen. sorry if that sounds dramatic, but it's certainly the case with the sunrise explosion.

I'm not suggesting there should be a change in zoning or anything, but it does make one see the landscape around them in a different way.

I hear ya. We live in the same area and I thought the same thing yesterday too.

We just had some electrical work done in our place and it opened my eyes up to potential fire hazards because of old wiring, outlets and light switches, etc. In fact, I'm more leery of neighbourhood house fires because of people not know what's behind their walls - our electrician used the example from Gravity when Stone flips a light switch and a fire starts.
 

Hawk Eye

TRIBE Member
This is the view from my cubicle at work. I was sitting in my chair when I took this.. didn't zoom in or anything.. The time of this was at 11am.. It finally stopped around 2 or 3pm. As the minutes wore on, the smoke got thicker and thicker. It was insane to watch.

i work at yonge/eg.

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