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router suggestions

billy

TRIBE Member
i'm tired of the lag our current router has. i'm tired of the extensionholic warnings telling me my connection is down when it isn't.

so, what are some of the better wired routers out there.
 
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billy

TRIBE Member
SmoothOperator said:
D-Link DIR-655 has been discussed in here many times. I couldn't be happier!

looks pretty serious. we don't have any laptops here but i guess it wouldn't hurt to have something that could handle down the road purchases. i have a d-link EBR 2310 right now and am less than pleased with it. i shouldn't have to stop all other net activity to let MSN connect.

canada computers has this for $109 cash price.
 

Bass-Invader

TRIBE Member
i have an airport extreme, it's more reliable than any router i've previously owned. it is, however annoying that you need to use software to configure it rather than a web-based interface.
 

workdowntown

TRIBE Member
Linksys WRT54GL(the L is for Linux)+ DD-WRT firmware.

I've had downtime once in the nearly a year since I bought it.
 
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Vise

TRIBE Member
SmoothOperator said:
D-Link DIR-655 has been discussed in here many times. I couldn't be happier!

Ditto, the DIR-655 is way faster than any router I've had in the past... plus the gigabit ethernet ports made a huge difference on my PC (gigabit ethernet on the mobo).
 

oddmyth

TRIBE Member
Gigabit ethernet means that the ports can communicate at 1gbps or 1024 megabits per second. This should be noted that the difference between a megaBYTE and a megaBIT is a multiple of 8 (ie. 8 megabits = 1 megabyte).

Gigabit ethernet (1gbps) as opposed to fast ethernet (100mbps) is only useful in inter-office/home connections where each end is 1gbps in speed.

Gigabit ethernet connections to the internet are completely useless and won't make a lick of difference because the speed at which you connect through your router is limited by your connection to your ISP which in Ontario is usually less than 10mbps for non-business connections.

As for which router you should choose, usually its more a problem of a misconfigured router than it is of a bad piece of hardware, however if you need to choose a new one I would always suggest either a netgear or linksys product, although I have been using DLink products for the past 5 years without any problems whatsoever.
 
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Aerius Zension

TRIBE Member
billy said:
again, i'm looking for a wired router. we don't use laptops at the moment.

I had a wired router and regretted it a few months after the purchase. I'm pretty sure you can connect an ethernet cable to a wireless. It's not just for laptops, you can use it on a desktop too, provided you have a wireless card. Never a dumb purchase, unless you recently bought a PC without one

<--------:mad:
 
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CiG

TRIBE Member
The DIR 655 has 4 ports at the back for wired connections as well...

DIR-655_back_main.jpg
 

praktik

TRIBE Member
allow me to chime in and also recommend the DIR-655 - got it fairly shortly after release and its been 100% reliable the whole time.

Plus its options for tuning settings are great and the interface for doing so is the best I've used in a router at home...
 

billy

TRIBE Member
oddmyth said:
Gigabit ethernet (1gbps) as opposed to fast ethernet (100mbps) is only useful in inter-office/home connections where each end is 1gbps in speed.

would such a router still function if ends are only 100mbps? how would i find out if ends can handle 1gbps?
 

oddmyth

TRIBE Member
billy,

absolutely. you can use fast or gigabit ethernet routers with fast or gigabit routers. The router and the network card will automagically negotiate the speed at which they will talk. In the very very rare case in this day and age that they don't automagically do it, you can force them to talk at a certain speed with settings on the router and network card, but most assuredly any router made in the past 5 years will definitely auto-negotiate speed.

In regards to whether your network card is gigabit capable. You can simply google the model number that shows up in the Device Manager and see the specs of the card itself. Again most computers sold in the last 5 years will ship with gigabit capable cards. I'm sure people still sell fast ethernet cards but I rarely see machines specced with them.

For your router it will usually say on the box whether its gigabit capable. Most home routers aren't gigabit and are usually fast ethernet (usually noted as 10/100 or fast ethernet, gigabit products are usually listed as 10/100/1000). As I said before gigabit routers are a bit useless unless you are doing alot of large file transfers inside your home network (ie. moving LARGE movie files from computer to computer). Your internet connection is always less than 10mbps so its not utilizing even 1/10th of the possible overhead your router is capable of handling.
 
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billy

TRIBE Member
thanks! it was easy as opening the device manager and selecting the network card. it said gigabit in the name.
 

billy

TRIBE Member
could someone help me with the wireless protection set up? I don't have any wireless devices so i'm not clear on how all that works. I want it to be set up so that no one can take advantage of it yet but if someone comes over with a laptop they can use it.
 

Dr. Grinch

TRIBE Member
billy said:
could someone help me with the wireless protection set up? I don't have any wireless devices so i'm not clear on how all that works. I want it to be set up so that no one can take advantage of it yet but if someone comes over with a laptop they can use it.


Encryption is a pain in the ass, and doesn't always play nice with other devices and flavors of OS. My two cents is set up a MAC address filter that only allows devices that you have authorized on to the network. That way nobody can just hop on unless you add them explicitly in the router config.
Look for Mac Filtering in your wireless or security options. To find out the MAC address of your wireless nic do an IPConfig /All at a command prompt
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
workdowntown said:
Linksys WRT54GL(the L is for Linux)+ DD-WRT firmware.

I've had downtime once in the nearly a year since I bought it.
lol ... yeah, I actually have two Linksys WRT150N routers set up in my apartment. My apartment is quite long and many doors/walls separate each end, which meant that even with the new N router the signal was dropping at one end. So I set up WDS Nodes for both routers (1 router at one end of the apartment, the other router at the other end). I can now move freely in the apartment with excellent signal.

I would never consider anything other than a Linksys based on the fact that DD-WRT is invaluable to me, though I recognize other brands/models support the DD-WRT firmware.
 
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CiG

TRIBE Member
~atp~ said:
lol ... yeah, I actually have two Linksys WRT150N routers set up in my apartment. My apartment is quite long and many doors/walls separate each end, which meant that even with the new N router the signal was dropping at one end. So I set up WDS Nodes for both routers (1 router at one end of the apartment, the other router at the other end). I can now move freely in the apartment with excellent signal.

I would never consider anything other than a Linksys based on the fact that DD-WRT is invaluable to me, though I recognize other brands/models support the DD-WRT firmware.

I've had nothing but bad luck with that 150N at my friends house. Similarly it's a long hallway between the router and a device and the signal drops all the time.

Recently I changed it to G only on a specific channel and it seems to be holding a connection much better/longer. However he bought it for the Draft N lol.
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
Yeah, there are a few interesting things to point out about the 150N, but really the baseline I use is driven entirely by the DD-WRT firmware. As soon as I purchase a new router, I upgrade to the DD-WRT firmware and use that as a basis for my recommendations to others! :)

I have had zero issues with both of my 150N routers (in WDS Node configuration) and I use MAC filters + AES (WPA Personal) on my wireless network. I also have a virtual network that I use as a fishing pond for curious connectors seeking public access points...so what I have is really this:

SSID #1: AES + MAC filter, with DHCP static leases (by the way, those of you struggling between the use of DHCP from an IP pool and static IP assignment should consider this option, it provides additional reliability and security).

SSID #2: Open network with bandwidth restrictions and a small (< 10) IP pool. I use this to cause trouble with people who get too curious. :)

Incidentally, I also have SSID #2 around for my g/f's Mac. Macs do occasionally have problems with maintaining a connection on encrypted networks, so I have SSID #2 there for when SSID #1 is just not working nicely. Also, SSID #2 is handy for people who come over and want to use their own PC/phone/WiFi-enabled device.

One more note about using MAC filters only ... A MAC filter will ensure that only certain hardware devices can use your network, but it doesn't prevent someone from capturing your (unencrypted) packets and sniffing passwords, etc, etc.
 

Dr. Grinch

TRIBE Member
~atp~ said:
One more note about using MAC filters only ... A MAC filter will ensure that only certain hardware devices can use your network, but it doesn't prevent someone from capturing your (unencrypted) packets and sniffing passwords, etc, etc.


Wholly valid point. I take for granted I live in the burbs and my neighbours think Snort is a noise you make. ;)
That, and I do all my real computing over my wired network.
 

workdowntown

TRIBE Member
~atp~ said:
I would never consider anything other than a Linksys based on the fact that DD-WRT is invaluable to me, though I recognize other brands/models support the DD-WRT firmware.

Same here, in my experience... everything other than Linksys is kinda touchy with DD-WRT; lots of problems flashing the new firmware, a bit more prone to brick when I max out the Xmit to reasonable levels to get a solid signal to the basement, Antenna issues, overheats etc

I've always found linksys hardware to be outstanding for the home user, their firmware though is so needlessly crippled.
 
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