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Richie Hawtin: DE9 2005

~atp~

TRIBE Member
Two of those times, I was definitely there from the get-go. One of them involved the 909 (or some other drum machine, I don't remember exactly), the other was here in Toronto a few years ago. You might be right though, my evidence is pretty anecdotal. :)
 

kaniz

TRIBE Member
mmmm...brain-fuck minimal, my favorite kind :) although, it doesnt always translate to a club setting very well.

however, I am ashamed to admit I've only seen him once (at Kabin). For a long time, I didnt 'get' his music and didnt pay much attention to him, and then one day something clicked, and now I have the urge to goto berlin and buy t-shirts while drinking some of magdas tea.
 

Acidman

TRIBE Member
I think Richie's set at Guvernemnt was great, I think it was better than the set he played in Kabin.
He has been pushing the minimal sound for a while now, and i respect that, and to tell you the truth i hate anything mainstream even if it sounds good, when music goes mainstream it loses its uniqueness. the fewer people know your sound the better thats what i think.
he is trying to show that music doesn't have to be hard and full of drums, His music maybe wont satisfy the hunger of those people on E, what they need is rush, they need to hear hard music, play any crap they will like it as long as it is hard...thats the main crowd in guverment...Well Richie's music sounds more attractive and enjoyable on LSD! all these minimal sounds and the emptiness of his music, thats the beauty of it, yeah some people will always hate him but does that mean he is no good?
he plays the music of future, he plays psychedelic, and he wont care if everybody leaves the dancefloor... he gets paid to play what he wants (not what the crowd wants to hear).
If every dj plays what the crowd wants then everybody will end up playing the same stupid mainstream tracks just like we see lots of djs doing it.
Why is it that everyone thinks music has to be danceable
 

oddmyth

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Acidman

He has been pushing the minimal sound for a while now, and i respect that, and to tell you the truth i hate anything mainstream even if it sounds good, when music goes mainstream it loses its uniqueness. the fewer people know your sound the better thats what i think.
Decent post, unfortunately I lost any respect I had for it right off the bat.
 

grit

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Acidman
IIf every dj plays what the crowd wants then everybody will end up playing the same stupid mainstream tracks just like we see lots of djs doing it.
that's a good point though. and it's true, most dj's out there play the same friggin records as everyone else. what's 'hot' at the moment, everyone runs out and buys. this is especially true in certain dance music cliques. (won't mention any)

well i say fuck that. do something different dammit.
play shit NO ONE else plays. and i'm not talkin about 'idiotic different' , like a death metal record, after a garage record, but simply try to show some originality.

on a different note, i don't even know about techno these days. i skim through the paxahau archives (for example) when a new set is put up, and i find most of the sets to be pretty poorly programmed, with wack trax thrown in in the middle of nowhere. loud, messy, annoying trax. i don't know when the last time was I heard a really deep techno set, (online or live) where EVERY song from start to finish was the bomb. and personally it only takes 2 to 3 bad songs in a set to ruin the whole thing.

what was i talkin about again? oh yeah, people playing the exact same records.
and loosing interest in techno due to lack or flow.
-guess Im moving back to the REALLY REALLY deep house feel. straight up hard funk, and roots reggae. some salsa's also's sounding dope. those weird rythmic basslines, repetitive cuban harmonized vocals. out of this world drumming.
 
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grit

TRIBE Member
no disrespect directed towards anyone. i know everyone tries. just had some thoughts i needed to get out. ;)
 

oddmyth

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by grit
that's a good point though. and it's true, most dj's out there play the same friggin records as everyone else. what's 'hot' at the moment, everyone runs out and buys. this is especially true in certain dance music cliques. (won't mention any)
To play devils advocate ;) Do you really think most of the DJ's you hear at clubs in Toronto, especially in the techno/tech-house realm go out and buy a record because its hot on the charts? Strangely I've never met one of these DJ's. Tunes usually become big because they are good in this scene, not the other way around.

Originally posted by grit
well i say fuck that. do something different dammit.
play shit NO ONE else plays. and i'm not talkin about 'idiotic different' , like a death metal record, after a garage record, but simply try to show some originality.
Isn't this what people are doing by playing techno/tech-house in the first place? .. I mean its a pretty small niche in to begin with. So you are saying I should play something absolutely different and the people on the dancefloor won't mind .. fawk I should have done that years ago.

Originally posted by grit
on a different note, i don't even know about techno these days. i skim through the paxahau archives (for example) when a new set is put up, and i find most of the sets to be pretty poorly programmed, with wack trax thrown in in the middle of nowhere. loud, messy, annoying trax. i don't know when the last time was I heard a really deep techno set, (online or live) where EVERY song from start to finish was the bomb. and personally it only takes 2 to 3 bad songs in a set to ruin the whole thing.
So wait .. didn't you just say play something different? But now you want a whole set of just deep techno (which is a pretty small niche of music as it is). So you are saying that if the DJ tries something different even for just one track then its gonna kill your vibe completely? Doesn't really sound like you are up for something different at all.

Originally posted by grit
what was i talkin about again? oh yeah, people playing the exact same records. and loosing interest in techno due to lack or flow.
-guess Im moving back to the REALLY REALLY deep house feel. straight up hard funk, and roots reggae. some salsa's also's sounding dope. those weird rythmic basslines, repetitive cuban harmonized vocals. out of this world drumming.
So in conclusion you just want the DJ to play the records that you would want to hear .. strangely you and the other XXX amount of people in the room have the same problem.
 

grit

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by oddmyth
To play devils advocate ;) Do you really think most of the DJ's you hear at clubs in Toronto, especially in the techno/tech-house realm go out and buy a record because its hot on the charts? Strangely I've never met one of these DJ's. Tunes usually become big because they are good in this scene, not the other way around.

--i wasn't really referrin to the techno community with that point.--



Isn't this what people are doing by playing techno/tech-house in the first place? .. I mean its a pretty small niche in to begin with. So you are saying I should play something absolutely different and the people on the dancefloor won't mind .. fawk I should have done that years ago.

--what i mean is attempt to SUPRISE people musically in a dj set. eg. theo parrish, francios K are great at this. don't just play the same shit as everyone else.
most sets i hear seem very mundane and lack dynamics these days.--




So wait .. didn't you just say play something different? But now you want a whole set of just deep techno (which is a pretty small niche of music as it is). So you are saying that if the DJ tries something different even for just one track then its gonna kill your vibe completely? Doesn't really sound like you are up for something different at all.



--i'd love to hear a whole set of deep techno. yeah that's one way of djing, opposed to the other more 'dynamic' method referred to above. i love both, as long as they're done well.
and i love to hear a dj experimenting up there. that's what it's all about. with production too. i can stand the Rock, grunge influence happening in the dance scene currently. i;m hearing too many trax with this rock vocal that comes in clearly sung by someone who's not really a singer, with some effects put on. as i said 2 to 3 bad records DOES ruin the set for me. immediately interupts the musical mind trip.--


-
 
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blipblurpbleep

TRIBE Member
my favorite part of DE9 | Transitions is not found on the dvd or the cd for that matter, but rather within the 'thanks to' section:


...thanks to derrick, kevin, juan, blake, d. wynn, eddie (yeah, even you)...

:)
 

gsnuff

TRIBE Promoter
Can I invite myself along?
I'd like to hear this on a 5.1 setup.

To say nothing of catching up with oddjob..

ie.. todd + tom

,g
 

Sanjay

TRIBE Member
i think the fact that everyone here is talking about him so much is a testament to the impact of the sound, art and image he's created.


i've heard transitions, and i like it. i don't think it's what i'd want in a club at 3am when i want to dance my ass off... but its certainly good music to cook breakfast too etc.

on the flipside, his recent 'nostalgik' ep's are so unbelievably crap, i'm flabbergasted.


again... a true artist, in that his shit's always a surprise and one that everyone's wondering about.


(and for the record... he had a flufftop hairstyle in the early 90's in windsor).

time to go polish my copy of 'elements of tone' heh heh.
 

digitalux

TRIBE Member
Hawtin was nominated for a dancestar usa music video award...
Hawtin is #12 going up in DJ Mag's top 100 DJ poll. Villallobos also went up and Magda is a new entry.... hrrm.... apparently minimal techno is super super popular beyond the Berlin scene now (around Europe?), though largely due to the press exposure about the Berlin scene, and teh genre is becoming *trendy* and more commercially successfull ....

But Toronto is still all about the trendyness with the electro sounds... (and coming from MTL - I noticed it was 'late' to embrace the sound at the scale it has now, and it's interesting that is still going strong). But also it's funny how minimal is "cool" but it was already cool a while back in Toronto. Do you think it will become cool again? Most sentiments I hear from the broader club/ electronic music scenes around Toronto is that it's for nerds and chin strokers - which is a shame....
 
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eLeKTRon

TRIBE Member
Yesterday, I chanced upon this article in Klublife Magazine.


RICHIE HAWTIN
Words: EMILY TAN

When describing DJ-production techno-wizard, Richie Hawtin, the term “genius†would not be inappropriate. In excited anticipation of his latest release, DE9: Transitions (Novamute/M-nus), Hawtin has been inviting select journalists and electronic music heavy-weights in a handful of cities to preview portions of the 96-minute recording. What fortunate guests have been treated to hearing has been radiantly pure, unadulterated, celebratory techno.

What makes DE9: Transitions different from the sea of other DJ mixes and compilations is that Hawtin’s mix was assembled and produced from the ground-up, entirely in 5.1 surround sound. Says Hawtin, “The CD’s constructed; I wouldn’t say it’s composed.†As listeners of DE9: Transitions have witnessed first-hand, the CD has been heard only at private screenings hosted by Richie Hawtin, and at his live shows including Sonar in Barcelona, since no promotional advances are being distributed for this somewhat secretive project-the listening experience can be unique with each play of the surround sound CD, based on where the listener is positioned in the room. This is because, unlike conventional surround sound recordings, Hawtin crafted DE9: Transitions to have sonic elements of equal yet varying degrees of importance on all channels. For example, traditional surround sound recordings place the bulk of information in stereo: voices in the mid-channels and special effects in the rear-channels. Says Hawtin, “As you know, my music isn’t traditional. I put things all over the place. When we got to the tweaking, Ronald Prent [of Galaxy Studios in Belgium] pushed me even further. The mid position is the best one, but it an encompassing experience. When I was in Sonar last week, I was sitting in different areas of the room and listening to the mix, and each area was a different experience.â€

One can hear layer upon luxurious layer of sound that emanates from the strategically placed speakers pumping tracks from DE9: Transitions. Big, bad-ass techno slices the air with the incisive sound of synthesized high-hats, the low-end rumble of the bassline, and the boom! of heavy 4/4 beats, forming the foundation of Hawtin’s heartfelt, powerful techno. Listeners at Hawtin’s preview sessions think to themselves, This is gonna be fat on a thumping dancefloor! Indeed, Richie Hawtin knows intimately well how to move a packed dancefloor, and DE9: Transitions is an immersive experience.

Following the critical acclaim of earlier Richie Hawtin releases, Decks, EFX & 909 (1999) and DE9: Closer To The Edit (2001), this latest installment in the DE9 series uses technology’s latest advancements in recording, production and automation to free Hawtin up and allow him much more sonic head room in which to work. Says Hawtin, “The more I thought about it, the more it seemed to be the right time to jump into the surround-sound world. Before, I had to use three or four different programs and patch things together. Almost like doing things manually. Now, with advanced software like Ableton Live, I don’t get bogged-down in the non-artistic, menial tasks.†Although DE9:Transitions has a lot going on, it doesn’t sound over-worked. Hawtin has also added elements like spooky, supernatural-sounding Plastikman vocals and bits and pieces of previously-unreleased original material.

Born in Windsor, Canada and today working from Berlin, Germany (when he’s not touring), Richie Hawtin is unsurprisingly the son of a robotics engineer. Having grown-up in a forward-thinking household where experimenting with machines and dreaming about the artistic possibilities of technology beyond its normal bounds was encouraged, it’s no surprise that Hawtin has evolved into one of the most technologically advanced DJ-producers today. Together with John Acquaviva, Hawtin contributed to the development of Native Instruments’ Traktor Final Scratch, which-having been co-produced by Stanton Magnetics-is changing the art of DJing. With his independent record labels-Plus 8 (which was started in 1990 with Hawtin’s then-partner, John Acquaviva) and M-nus (pronounced “minusâ€), Hawtin is able to release music that he feels needs to be heard. While also recording music and performing under the moniker Plastikman, Hawtin has gained a reputation for frighteningly honest, minimal techno, as heard on the haunting Plastikman albums, Consumed (1998) and Closer (2003).

Only a handful of world-famous DJs are as obsessed with his music as Richie Hawtin, and his tireless drive is a feat to behold. In the months and weeks leading up to and preparing for the Mutek show in Canada in 2003, Hawtin took time out from his schedule to give three interviews to DJ TIMES Magazine in the US, sleep-be-damned. Since Hawtin was set to perform as a one-man show at Mutek-lording-over parameters beyond the usual audio-custom-made controllers were necessary. One of these custom controllers was a special CTRL mixer customized for Hawtin by Allen & Heath; the other was a set of bass plates that Hawtin stood on for monitoring. These plates sent bass frequencies up Hawtin’s legs, and although they were effective for passive monitoring of bass frequencies, Hawtin’s repeated practice sessions using them might have caused temporary nerve damage to his legs. (Thankfully, Hawtin feels fine today.)

DE9: Transitions will be released with a DVD containing original visual content. Both 5.1 surround sound and stereo versions of the audio CD will be available. DE9: Transitions is scheduled for release in North America on October 18 (Novamute/M-nus).
 

beta tester

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by digitalux
Hawtin was nominated for a dancestar usa music video award...
Hawtin is #12 going up in DJ Mag's top 100 DJ poll. Villallobos also went up and Magda is a new entry.... hrrm.... apparently minimal techno is super super popular beyond the Berlin scene now (around Europe?), though largely due to the press exposure about the Berlin scene, and teh genre is becoming *trendy* and more commercially successfull ....
I don't think you can really take their ratings on the DJ Mag list as evidence of much. Emails were sent out to the m_nus, Plastikman, Paxahau and a few other mailing lists asking for people to vote for minimal djs. I think their placements on the list are just a reflection of a lot of people voting in that poll who normally don't.

But that doesn't mean it isn't becoming more popular, I just don't think a usually house/prog/trance oriented "favourite djs" magazine poll is any reliable evidence.

For what it's worth, more and more artists in Detroit keep saying they're "over" the whole minimal sound (whatever the hell that means), which probably means that it is becoming more popular, since those in the 313 seem to have this hilarious aversion to liking anything that's popular with more than six people.
 

miller

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by beta tester
I don't think you can really take their ratings on the DJ Mag list as evidence of much. Emails were sent out to the m_nus, Plastikman, Paxahau and a few other mailing lists asking for people to vote for minimal djs. I think their placements on the list are just a reflection of a lot of people voting in that poll who normally don't.

But that doesn't mean it isn't becoming more popular, I just don't think a usually house/prog/trance oriented "favourite djs" magazine poll is any reliable evidence.

For what it's worth, more and more artists in Detroit keep saying they're "over" the whole minimal sound (whatever the hell that means), which probably means that it is becoming more popular, since those in the 313 seem to have this hilarious aversion to liking anything that's popular with more than six people.
so true, but the scene is always fresh and forward-thinking at least.

well said about "DJ Mag" not being representative of much...
 
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