• Hi Guest: Welcome to TRIBE, the online home of TRIBE MAGAZINE. If you'd like to post here, or reply to existing posts on TRIBE, you first have to register. Join us!

revue, royal & kingsway cinemas to close :(

trinitydub

TRIBE Member
*sniff*


Three longtime repertory cinema houses — the Revue, the Royal and the Kingsway — are slated to close by the end of June.
The theatres — part of the Festival Cinemas group — were owned by cinema entrepreneur Peter McQuillan, who died in October 2004.
Last night, his son Mark told the Star that he and his two siblings made the decision to close the theatres reluctantly.
"The heart and soul was my father. Since (his death), we have been trying our best to run (the business).
``But we don't have the time, the energy and the financial wherewithal to keep it going," said McQuillan, noting difficult market conditions contributed to their decision.
"I feel bad if they are closing. We might get a few more customers but I don't know what it says for the industry," said Carmelo Bordonaro, owner of the Bloor Cinema.
"It's a labour of love, these cinemas, believe me — a lot of hard work," Bordonaro said.
Bordonaro, a one-time partner with Peter McQuillan, said he was a "great guy."
"He loved film, he loved cinemas and he really supported the film industry in a lot of ways. He was an amazing guy. I miss him all the time," Bordonaro said.
Bordonaro said the entire movie industry is experiencing dramatic changes, with new films being downloaded from the Internet, DVDs being released in a shorter time period following a new film's release at major theatres, and DVDs also being sold at big discounts.
All those factors and others are making it increasingly difficult for repertory theatres to compete and survive, he said.
 

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
Wow that's super shitty. I hope someone else buys them, it would be a shame to lose what's left of Toronto's old movie houses.

<3 Carm. Ask him about chem trails! :p
 

littlejon

TRIBE Member
boo!
no more kung-fu fridays. no more $4 matinees. no more mindnight madness.
i am about 3 doors down from the royal. this sucks more than sucking sucks.

it i'll prolly be replaced by a lame-ass super club, royal beba.
boo!
 
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders

Flashy_McFlash

Well-Known TRIBEr
What!

I've been going to the Kingsway since I was 10! Losing the Royal will be a big loss as well.

First the Elgin, now this...What a sorry state of affairs. The Kingsway was really the crown jewel of Bloor West. I'm going to make an effort to see something there before it closes.

:(

What they don't realize is that it's theatres like this that prevent piracy. When I go to the cinema (and I don't think I'm the only one), I prefer it that have that theatre atmosphere that only the Festival cinemas provide. The multiplexes make it feel like you're watching a movie in a fucking mall.
 

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
Yeah paying $6 for a film that you want to see on the screen in film quality is everything vs. downloading and watching a crappy resolution on a computer screen.

I'm getting a little tired of the "downloading is ruining the arts" argument. I download shit all the time, and probably go to more movies in the cinema now than I ever have. Festival Cinemas have always had a hard time even before downloading became popular. As Carm said, it takes a certain kind of person to keep those types of businesses alive.
 

Flashy_McFlash

Well-Known TRIBEr
Very true.

It'd be cool if the rep cinemas were signed over to the Film Festival Group in an effort to spread out Cinematheque and make it more accessible, but I doubt that they can justify that kind of cost when they are building the Festival Centre at King and John (which will house several theatres).
 

littlejon

TRIBE Member
yeah, the royal is often used for various festivals, private showings and events.
the toronto festival, inside out, reel asian, the jew-y one.. all of those have showings at those theatres.

it would be amazing if the festivals could some how band together to save the venues, but it is not like they have any money or time to get involved.
 

Flashy_McFlash

Well-Known TRIBEr
The Toronto Film fest Group is the only organization like that in TO with anything close to the resources to do that, and those resources are tied up in their own projects (Festival Centre).

lol @ the jew-y one.
 
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders

dyad

TRIBE Member
I remember when the Music Hall closed attendence was dismal. There was even a save your local theatre campaign and people still didnt go.

I remember living right by the Royal, nice little theatre.
 

littlejon

TRIBE Member
inside out is getting huge, it is the second largest in canada, now.

but i know - they are all broke as fuck. i can have wishful thoughts.
come on! kung-fu fridays!
boo!
 

rave jedi

TRIBE Member
This is heartbreaking because it gives me flashbacks of when they tore down the University Theatre at Bay/Bloor. That's where I watched all of the original Star Wars trilogy for the first time.:(
 

ginsu

TRIBE Member
Nooooo.

Man, I remember seeing movies like Se7en for the 1st time at The Kingsway.

And where else (other than maybe Cinematheque) do they show prints of Hitchcock and all the other greats...
 
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders

rhyss

TRIBE Member
maan...so many memories of all of these old theatres. I took ndwrld to see him first 3D movie at The Royal. I believe it was Andy Warhol's Frankenstein in 3D.
 
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders

alma

TRIBE Member
No fucking way. That is sad. I saw 'Midnight Cowboy' and 'Easy Rider' for the first time at the Revue. The print of 'Easy Rider' was so old that the film stock had turned pink. I was looking at the Sixties through rose-coloured glasses. My new job is up near the old Eglinton cinema, another goner.

Fuck! :(
 

Ms. C

TRIBE Member
Royal revival
Lights back on at College Street rep
By SCOTT MACDONALD

When news broke several weeks ago that four of Toronto's Festival Cinemas movie houses would be closing down on June 30, the situation looked most hopeless for the Royal on College Street.

While the three other theatres – the Revue, the Kingsway and the Paradise – were simply slated to go dark, the Royal was immediately put up for sale by the owners, presumably because it occupied the most valuable plot of real estate.

Rumours abounded that the historic 1930s-era theatre would be turned into a nightclub or, worse, torn down for condos. But as it turns out, the sale of the Royal will almost certainly prove to be its saving.

Though the deal isn't official until July 5, the Royal, NOW has learned, has been purchased by a scrappy young company called Theatre D Digital, which also owns the art deco Regent Theatre on Mount Pleasant.

When Theatre D bought the Regent in 2002, they restored the 1920s-era theatre and began operating it during the day as a high-end digital post-production studio. (Directors like Atom Egoyan and Patricia Rozema have edited their films there.)

Meanwhile, in the evenings, they continued to screen films in the theatre. This ingenious business model has apparently proved lucrative for Theatre D, and co-founder Dan Peel says they plan to repeat it at the Royal.

"Our plans are to restore the building back to its 1930s glory," he says.
Furthermore, the restoration won't stop with just the building itself: when Peel and his two partners, John Hazen and Carlos Herrera, begin outfitting the theatre with their state-of-the-art post-production equipment, they'll also be bringing in what Peel refers to as "the absolute best" in digital projection and 5.1 THX surround sound.

"The projector I'm talking about is beyond what's been seen yet in North America," he says excitedly.

The only question now is what kind of theatre the Royal will be. It could probably carry on as it has for the past few years, screening mostly second-run Hollywood and independent films, but why bother? Wouldn't a better approach be to turn the Royal into a dedicated screening space for first-run art-house films?

In New York there are several independently run movie houses that continuously program decidedly non-mainstream fair.

The trick is to find some way of underwriting the programming. New York's Film Forum, for example, operates as a not-for-profit, soliciting 25 per cent of its operating funds from public and private sources.

This isn't New York, of course, but it's hard to believe we can't support at least one or two cinemas on this model. In any case, the underwriting will already be taken care of at the Royal in the form of the post-production business, so isn't this the perfect time to try an ambitious cinematic lineup?
Peel says he and his partners have yet to determine what kind of films they will screen, but they will definitely be working with distributors to see if they can get access to more first-run art-house films "I hope the programming will be different," he says. "I hope it will be better."

To this end, he's begun soliciting advice from nearby video store clerks, in hopes of getting a better sense of what the neighbourhood will support. "Ultimately, we're going to rely on the community to [determine] programming," says Peel, "because they're the ones who are going to support it."

news@nowtoronto.com
NOW | JUNE 29 - JULY 5, 2006 | VOL. 25 NO. 44
 

starr

TRIBE Member
Ms. C said:
Royal revival
Lights back on at College Street rep
By SCOTT MACDONALD

Though the deal isn't official until July 5, the Royal, NOW has learned, has been purchased by a scrappy young company called Theatre D Digital, which also owns the art deco Regent Theatre on Mount Pleasant.

..........

"Our plans are to restore the building back to its 1930s glory," he says.
Furthermore, the restoration won't stop with just the building itself: when Peel and his two partners, John Hazen and Carlos Herrera, begin outfitting the theatre with their state-of-the-art post-production equipment, they'll also be bringing in what Peel refers to as "the absolute best" in digital projection and 5.1 THX surround sound.

...........

This isn't New York, of course, but it's hard to believe we can't support at least one or two cinemas on this model. In any case, the underwriting will already be taken care of at the Royal in the form of the post-production business, so isn't this the perfect time to try an ambitious cinematic lineup?
Peel says he and his partners have yet to determine what kind of films they will screen, but they will definitely be working with distributors to see if they can get access to more first-run art-house films "I hope the programming will be different," he says. "I hope it will be better."

news@nowtoronto.com
NOW | JUNE 29 - JULY 5, 2006 | VOL. 25 NO. 44
Awesome :)

I had made plans to go tonight and I think I still will, just in case the deal falls through for some horrible reason.

Last showing:
Monty Python And The Holy Grail (1975) D: Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones w/ John Cleese, Graham Chapman. 7 pm. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) D: Stanley Kubrick w/ Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood. 9 pm.
 
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders
Top