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Recommend ONE album from 85-95

Rude1_247

TRIBE Member
In this thread you will name one COMPLETE album you would recommend that was released between 85-95. I don't mean just a collection of tracks, but an album that, when listened end-to-end, becomes an entity it and of itself.

To start things off, I'll go with Paul's Boutique by The Beastie Boys in 1989
 

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
The Humpty Dance by Digital Underground.

Hadn't heard it in about 15 years then BAM. Love it.

I think it came out around '90.
 

Rude1_247

TRIBE Member
Great track, hog, a personal fave of mine for sure. What I'm looking for though is a complete album recommendation! That being said, Sex Packets, the album that The Humpty Dance was released on, was actually pretty solid.
 
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Hal-9000

TRIBE Member
Up and down classic:






Extremely significant for 1991's Breaking Atoms alone, Main Source's effect on hip-hop is nearly impossible to gauge, especially when considering Large Professor and K-Cut's contributions outside of the group. Consisting of MC/producer Large Professor (born Paul Mitchell) and twin DJs/producers K-Cut (born Kevin McKenzie) and Sir Scratch, the New York group came together in 1989 and debuted on Wild Pitch with Breaking Atoms -- an undeniably classic album, regardless of its field -- two years later. The group's production work, combined with Large Professor's masterful wordplay (from the brilliant baseball analogies drawn throughout the police brutality-themed "Just a Friendly Game of Baseball," to the disheartening romantic strife depicted in "Looking at the Front Door"), set a standard. While Gang Starr's DJ Premier is commonly heralded as a groundbreaking sampler and beatmaker, it was Large Professor and K-Cut who schooled him on how to master the SP1200. Not only that, but Breaking Atoms' "Live at the Barbeque" helped establish the careers of both Akinyele and Nas.Large Professor left the group due to financial issues and began to concentrate on production work. K-Cut and Sir Scratch continued the group and installed MC Mikey D. for 1994's F*ck What You Think. Though it hardly holds a candle to Breaking Atoms (to be fair, it would've been tough to build on that record, even with Large Professor's presence), the album was hardly an artistic failure, but it came and went without much notice. Without their greatest weapon, the group's second go-round wasn't given much of a chance. It didn't help that it took three years to reach fruition. Meanwhile, Large Professor was racking up production credits for Eric B. & Rakim, Akinyele, Mobb Deep, Nas, and Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth. He didn't make his proper solo debut until 2002, with the disappointing 1st Class.
 
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Tony Bandana

TRIBE Promoter
wow too many too choose from..I was gonna go with Tribe - Low end Theory

but, i figure I'll go with a hiiden gem classicc that was mainly produced by Primo



killer record

:D

btw I still love License To Ill better then Pauls Boutique.
 

ED Larry

TRIBE Member
realeased at the end of 94, so it just made it in the time line...



classic from begining to end... what a fuckin album!!!
 

Tony Bandana

TRIBE Promoter
Flashy_McFlash said:
Gotta give this one some props first and foremost - this turned my like for hip-hop into love.

yeah this one blew my mind when i heard it too ..BUT now that time has past. I would take Snoop Doggy Doggs - Doggystyle over this one now.

cause some parts of The Chronic are a little cheesy like "Eazy E Can eat a big fat dick"

or Nate Doggs verse "i cant be faded ..im a n*igga from the mothefuckin streets"

i dunno ..i might even go out on a limb here and say Doggystyle might be the best Rap record alltime?

:D
 
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Tony Bandana

TRIBE Promoter
ah fuck it im doin 2 lol

the sickest , illest crack rap record I ever heard..i dunno what the RZA was on when he made this , but for the amount of tracks along with the lyrical darts,.



unbelivable .

:D
 
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Flashy_McFlash

Well-Known TRIBEr
Tony Bandana said:
yeah this one blew my mind when i heard it too ..BUT now that time has past. I would take Snoop Doggy Doggs - Doggystyle over this one now.

cause some parts of The Chronic are a little cheesy like "Eazy E Can eat a big fat dick"

or Nate Doggs verse "i cant be faded ..im a n*igga from the mothefuckin streets"

i dunno ..i might even go out on a limb here and say Doggystyle might be the best Rap record alltime?

:D
Doggystyle is definitely at least as good and probably better than The Chronic, but Chronic really defined G-Funk and even in its cheeziest moments, it's still pretty good. The skits still crack me up to this day, and how can you not love that Nate Dogg line! Talk about a hook!
 
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Rude1_247

TRIBE Member
Rude1_247 said:
In this thread you will name one COMPLETE album you would recommend that was released between 85-95. I don't mean just a collection of tracks, but an album that, when listened end-to-end, becomes an entity it and of itself.

To start things off, I'll go with Paul's Boutique by The Beastie Boys in 1989
A non-exhaustive list of the tracks that were sampled during the production of Paul's Boutique (from wikipedia):

To All the GirlsShake Your RumpJohnny RyallEgg ManHigh Plains DrifterThe Sounds of Science3-Minute Rule
  • "Feel Good" by Fancy
  • "Brave and Strong", & "Poet" by Sly & the Family Stone
Hey Ladies5-Piece Chicken DinnerLooking Down the Barrel of a Gun
  • "Time" by Pink Floyd
  • "Mississippi Queen" by Mountain
  • "Last Bongo in Belgium" by the Incredible Bongo Band
  • This track is the only track on the album to feature live instrumentation in the form of electric guitar played by Adam Horovitz, and bass played by Adam Yauch, as seen in the music video for this track.
Car ThiefWhat Comes AroundShadrach
  • "Say What" by Trouble Funk
  • "That's the Joint" by Funky 4+1
  • "Do Your Dance" by Rose Royce
  • "Never Let 'Em Say" by Ballin' Jack
  • "Funky Drummer" by James Brown
  • "Hot and Nasty" by Black Oak Arkansas
  • "Sugarhill Groove" by the Sugarhill Gang
  • "Loose Booty" by Sly & the Family Stone
Ask For Janice
  • Ad from a Jamaican music show on a New York radio station
B-Boy Bouillabaisse
01. 59 Chrystie Street02. Get on the Mic03. Stop That Train04. Year and a Day05. Hello Brooklyn06. Dropping Names07. Lay It on Me
  • "Let the Music Take Your Mind" by Kool & the Gang
08. Mike on the Mic
  • "At the Fever" by Lovebug Starski
09. A.W.O.L.
  • "Good Times" by Chic
  • "Good to Go" by Trouble Funk
  • "Loran's Dance" by Idris Muhammad
105 samples used over the whole album.

Shadrach, specifically, takes that album to the next level.
 
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