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RCMP boss supports DNA gathering at arrest, not conviction

Blysspluss

TRIBE Member
M'eh...the RCMP already have mine. Gave it to em via a family friend who was collecting it for them for some project or another a number of years back.

Not really worried about it.
 

praktik

TRIBE Member
Ya not sure this would fly - needs to clear some serious hurdles.

States doesn't have privacy built into their bill of rights - been a longstanding debate between originalists and those Activist Judges who see a right to privacy in the "penumbra" of other listed rights.

Here our charter is a bit more clear about it and as mentioned in the article, going forward this would provoke a constitutional debate.
 

mute79

TRIBE Member
M'eh...the RCMP already have mine. Gave it to em via a family friend who was collecting it for them for some project or another a number of years back.

Not really worried about it.
There is a difference between you CHOOSING to give up your rights and the powers at be taking them away from you...
 

Blysspluss

TRIBE Member
What rights?

I leave DNA everywhere. Just like most people. My hair falls out an a normal rate, skin flecks...you name it.

So what? It's not a chip implanted in me...yet.
 
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lobo

TRIBE Member
What rights?

I leave DNA everywhere. Just like most people. My hair falls out an a normal rate, skin flecks...you name it.

So what? It's not a chip implanted in me...yet.
Technically that phone you're carrying around with you all the time serves the same purpose as an implanted chip. ;) lol

Lobo
 

Blysspluss

TRIBE Member
True. And its a radio, so it's no surprise to me if my signals are intercepted.

S'okay...my telescreen tells me it's okay.

Just remember folks:
WAR IS PEACE
FREEDOM IS SLAVERY
IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH

...thanks Orwell.
 

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
A friend and I were sitting at the Mercury Espresso bar on their little patio, late afternoon, this past summer. All of a sudden, this nondescript dude - I guess in his mid 30's, biked up to the green bin which is next to the coffee shop.

He rested his bike against the railing and started digging through the green bin near the top which I though was kind of weird because the guy was definitely not a hobo - he was sort of clean cut actually. He seemed to be looking for something in particular.

He pulled out one of those paper recyclable coffee cups and then reached into the brown leather satchel he had and took out a clear plastic bag and put the cup into it, which he put back into his satchel. He hopped on his bike and rode off.

I didn't understand what was going on at first - it was so odd. I told my friend, who had his back to the green bin and didn't witness any of this, what I had just seen. He said it was probably CSIS or some other agency and they had been staking out the place and sent the dude in to collect a particular cup for dna or fingerprint evidence from one of the customers who had chucked his cup into the bin.

Surreal.
 

acheron

TRIBE Member
That's part of how they caught they caught the guy who raped and murdered Holly Jones... Once he was a suspect, they had him followed and collected a pop can he discarded to grab his DNA from.
 
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Bass-Invader

TRIBE Member
What rights?

I leave DNA everywhere. Just like most people. My hair falls out an a normal rate, skin flecks...you name it.

So what? It's not a chip implanted in me...yet.
It's not the possession of DNA that is the issue. It is the taking of the DNA, performing tests on it and then keeping of records associating that DNA with your person.

The general test is that the police can only search/seize things upon which you do not have a "reasonable expectation of privacy."

You could argue that DNA taken from lost hair follicles or whatever are abandoned and therefore fair game. On the other hand it can be argued that one's DNA fingerprint is a person's most intimate possession and should not be taken and withheld longer than is necessary to solve a crime or whatever.

It seems like a bad idea to allow samples to be taken upon arrest IF they intend to keep the samples in a database longer than necessary to either convict or rule the person out of the particular incident they were arrested for. That being said, if the samples and associated info are destroyed if the person is not subsequently convicted then I don't see a problem with it. I believe they are arguing for keeping the samples though.
 
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