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questions about linux

xtcfreak

TRIBE Member
I am not new to linux but its been a while since i have had it installed. When I did use it, It was slackware. While using it, I learned the basics of compiling kernels and getting around the file system. Not to long ago I tried Mandrake, didnt like it and went back to windows.

Over the weekend I decided to give it another go, and accidently formated my windows drive. Oh well, not a big loss I have *most* stuff backed up.

Here is my question , can I stay with linux and never have to use windows again? I am liking this flavour (Fedora) but might go back to slack. I never use my computer for anything hardcore, so I would also like to know if the following can be done and what s/w do I need to do it.

-DVD ripping and Burning
-Torrents ?
-News Bin reader (NZB files) and be able to process par files.
-Audio recording from my gear (Audacity??))

MSN, IRC and browsing I think I have figured out.

Will I need windows again?

Jay
 

Gunark

TRIBE Member
If you liked Slackware... i.e. a distro that doesn't try to hide the innards of Linux, i'd HIGHLY recommend Gentoo. You get all the power of Slackware, with none of the mess. It's a beautiful distro... I've been running it as my main desktop OS since about 2003, and still love it. It has probably the best package manager out there (portage), based on BSD's ports system. Then there's the excellent documentation (probably the best you'll find on the net), a really well thought out file system layout, etc, etc.

You'll also probably want KDE or Gnome as your desktop environment. I'd strongly suggest KDE over Gnome, but it's a matter of personal preference.

For burning, an excellent program is k3b (it's part of KDE) . Very powerful, with a nice GUI.

For music, there is no audio player better than KDE's amaroK (better than anything on Windows or Mac OS X, imho).

For recording, unfortunately Audacity is probably still your best choice. This is still a weak spot for Linux... you could also try rezsound or mhWaveEdit, although I've always had problems with those two.

For Torrents, you'll want Azureus.

For newsgroups... I dunno, I don't use them. You can try KNode, brag or glitter, but you'll probably have to try a few different apps before you find one you like.

As far as needing windows again... I have VMWare installed, which means that if I do need Windows (usually because I need Photoshop... gimp just doesn't cut it for me), I can just fire up Windows XP in a window. Of course if you play high-end 3D games, you'll still need XP installed as a dual-boot option.
 
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~atp~

TRIBE Member
Yes, with openoffice, mozilla, kmail (and more or less the entire KDE suite of applications) you should be all set. I would second a vote for gentoo as a good distribution for package management. Remember that all a distribution really is, is a way of managing your system. The system itself is independent of the distribution; the filesystem, the kernel, the packages themselves, and so on.

I would also add that there has been a lot of work done recently by the kernel guys for developing an audiophile's dream of an interface for the enablement of superior audio interfaces and driver libraries (currently inhibited by "shortcomings" of the monolithic kernel). I think the target is late this year or early next. In any case, good luck to you.
 

zoo

TRIBE Member
i'm nicely integrating the linux world into my computing experience, and one day may use it as my primary desktop os ..

the only things holding me back right now are various pieces of software that don't have "easy to find" linux equivalents, and i wouldn't trust to run under vmware ... but a dual boot would fix this since i rarely use these programs
 

miscreant

TRIBE Member
Top picks for distros: Slackware/Fedora Core/Gentoo/Ubuntu or for new people to linux: pclinuxos

or if you want to get real hardcore I suggest FreeBSD

For dvd ripping try out k9copy

good luck and posts your experiences
 
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xtcfreak

TRIBE Member
So far I have stuck to fedora , since it is already installed, and I have managed to get my self sort of settled down with it.

So, a couple of things :)

1) How do i switch to KDE , it was selected as a manager during install time, but i am currently using Gnome.

2) this K9copy, does it Decrypt DVD's like DVD-Shrink , is there something simular to dvd-shrink?

3) I tried to mount my 250 gig NTSF drive and it says the drive is not supported by the kernel.. Thinking about it as i write this from work , is it possible i spelled ntsf wrong? :)

thanks it for now, thanks linux peoples for all the help and input!

Jay
 

miscreant

TRIBE Member
Hey man:

To answer some of your questions:

1) To switch to kde, at the log in window click on sessions and kde should appear in the list of available window managers if you have it installed.

2) Yes it is here is the site to k9copy

http://k9copy.free.fr/

3) You should be able to mount the NTFS partition because Fedora has ntfs support but not sure if you can write to it. Not sure about the kernal issue, I believe there is an rpm for ntfs support. But don't quote me on this.

Cheers
 

miscreant

TRIBE Member
Found this to answer the ntfs question

http://www.fedorafaq.org/


Q: How do I read my NTFS (Windows NT/2000/XP/2003) drive in Fedora? (Updated 25 July 2005)
A: Well, now, that's an easy one! You just have to install the NTFS kernel module for your kernel:
Make sure you are using my yum configuration.
Open a terminal.
Become root.
Type:
yum install kernel-module-ntfs-$(uname -r)

Now you can read your NTFS drives! Unfortunately, you cannot write to them, though.

NOTE: You will have to re-run the above steps every time you install a new kernel, after you reboot with the new kernel.

For information on how to use your NTFS drive, you can read the NTFS FAQ.



cheers
 

xtcfreak

TRIBE Member
miscreant said:
Found this to answer the ntfs question

http://www.fedorafaq.org/


Q: How do I read my NTFS (Windows NT/2000/XP/2003) drive in Fedora? (Updated 25 July 2005)
A: Well, now, that's an easy one! You just have to install the NTFS kernel module for your kernel:
Make sure you are using my yum configuration.
Open a terminal.
Become root.
Type:
yum install kernel-module-ntfs-$(uname -r)

Now you can read your NTFS drives! Unfortunately, you cannot write to them, though.

NOTE: You will have to re-run the above steps every time you install a new kernel, after you reboot with the new kernel.

For information on how to use your NTFS drive, you can read the NTFS FAQ.



cheers
you have been more than helpfull, thank you.

I am wondering why ntfs drives cannot be written to?

Jay
 
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xtcfreak

TRIBE Member
I noticed for k9copy there is a RPM for everything but Fedora , and also it has rpms for all the other softwares needed for it work (vamps dvdauthor), do i have to compile from source , and hunt down all the other s/w aswell now?

Jay
 

Gunark

TRIBE Member
The reverse-engineered NTFS driver *can* write, but nobody's brave enough to turn this on by default. I wouldn't try it unless you want to risk destroying your data (even if the risk is small).
 

miscreant

TRIBE Member
xtcfreak said:
I noticed for k9copy there is a RPM for everything but Fedora , and also it has rpms for all the other softwares needed for it work (vamps dvdauthor), do i have to compile from source , and hunt down all the other s/w aswell now?

Jay
Pretty much, but you can use yum to install most of the needed apps. To my knowledge there is no fedora rpm for k9copy

It isn't available here either but I have found these two sites to come in handy when looking for certain rpms

http://rpm.pbone.net/

http://rpmfind.net/linux/rpm2html/
 

xtcfreak

TRIBE Member
miscreant said:
Pretty much, but you can use yum to install most of the needed apps. To my knowledge there is no fedora rpm for k9copy

It isn't available here either but I have found these two sites to come in handy when looking for certain rpms

http://rpm.pbone.net/

http://rpmfind.net/linux/rpm2html/
I dont mean for you to be my personal linux support :) , but what is yum? I have seen that word thrown around.. is it a system designed to find known s/w for you?

Again , thanks.

Jay
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
Gunark said:
The reverse-engineered NTFS driver *can* write, but nobody's brave enough to turn this on by default. I wouldn't try it unless you want to risk destroying your data (even if the risk is small).
I've done it for experimental purposes. :)

All this talk about "hey how do I use app 'X' in Linux..." is bringing a tear to my eye. It used to be that you would give instructions something like this:

1. download tarball.
2. hunt the internet for 2 months to find all the necessary libraries.
3. read the obscure "README.TXT" and "INSTALL.TXT" files for each untarred source tree.
4. pray that you understand the instructions, especially when written by someone whose first language is not english.
5. ./configure; make; make install
6. (pray heavily for each component of step (5) )
7. Try to run the binary executable


But now the answer is more trivial than with a windows application: "yah dude, just fucking emerge it..."
 
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xtcfreak

TRIBE Member
~atp~ said:
I've done it for experimental purposes. :)

All this talk about "hey how do I use app 'X' in Linux..." is bringing a tear to my eye. It used to be that you would give instructions something like this:

1. download tarball.
2. hunt the internet for 2 months to find all the necessary libraries.
3. read the obscure "README.TXT" and "INSTALL.TXT" files for each untarred source tree.
4. pray that you understand the instructions, especially when written by someone whose first language is not english.
5. ./configure; make; make install
6. (pray heavily for each component of step (5) )
7. Try to run the binary executable


But now the answer is more trivial than with a windows application: "yah dude, just fucking emerge it..."
Thats what I needed to hear :)

Jay
 

miscreant

TRIBE Member
No worries happy to help a fellow linux user,

You got it right Yum is a rpm package management system that runs through terminal. Basically you connect to respositories to download software and handle dependencies, by default if you check /etc/yum.conf (this is your yum configuration file to add more respositories) you will see the redhat respositories are already added to yum you will want to add livna and freshrpms to your yum config file follow the instructions on the websites to add gpg keys and yum config files.

http://apt.freshrpms.net/

http://rpm.livna.org/configuration.html

Great instructions for fedora yum and apt (it is for fedora 1 but still very useful)
http://www.brandonhutchinson.com/Fedora_apt_and_yum_repositories.html

usefull links to even more rpms:
http://atrpms.net/repos/

So once you are set up:
1)open a terminal window
2)switch to root user by typing su root and then enter your root password
3)as root type yum list
4)try to search for and install an application i.e. yum install vlc


Hope this helps and let us know how it works out for you and oh yeah there is a graphical version of yum called yumex which uses the same config file so it uses the same respositories, install it with yum and try it out as well. i.e. yum install yumex
 

Hypnotoad

TRIBE Member
For news reading, Pan is a good reader. It can handle .par and NZB files. Xcdroast is another decent burning program that is a gui for cdrecord, but I haven't played around with burning software.

If there is any software that you are having trouble finding a replacement, you can give WINE a try. It does windows emulation, or something like vmware/win4lin that runs a virtualized computer that you can run windows under.

And as far as distros go, I like Gentoo ok. I think the constant need to recompile everything is a big waste of time, but then I guess most CPU cycles are wasted. For ease of use I <3 Debian. Centralized repository for almost all packages, no having to search rpmfind for something. Also, while the maintainers can be a bit slow in releasing new versions, almost everything is rock solid stable, even the unstable branch.
 

xtcfreak

TRIBE Member
miscreant said:
No worries happy to help a fellow linux user,

You got it right Yum is a rpm package management system that runs through terminal. Basically you connect to respositories to download software and handle dependencies, by default if you check /etc/yum.conf (this is your yum configuration file to add more respositories) you will see the redhat respositories are already added to yum you will want to add livna and freshrpms to your yum config file follow the instructions on the websites to add gpg keys and yum config files.

http://apt.freshrpms.net/

http://rpm.livna.org/configuration.html

Great instructions for fedora yum and apt (it is for fedora 1 but still very useful)
http://www.brandonhutchinson.com/Fedora_apt_and_yum_repositories.html

usefull links to even more rpms:
http://atrpms.net/repos/

So once you are set up:
1)open a terminal window
2)switch to root user by typing su root and then enter your root password
3)as root type yum list
4)try to search for and install an application i.e. yum install vlc


Hope this helps and let us know how it works out for you and oh yeah there is a graphical version of yum called yumex which uses the same config file so it uses the same respositories, install it with yum and try it out as well. i.e. yum install yumex
I am going to try this tonight :)

Jay
 
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