• Hi Guest: Welcome to TRIBE, the online home of TRIBE MAGAZINE. If you'd like to post here, or reply to existing posts on TRIBE, you first have to register. Join us!

Public/Private Health Care on Harper's Agenda a Coincidence?

blahblah

TRIBE Member
Dr. Colleen M. Flood Appointed New Scientific Director of CIHR's Institute of Health Services and Policy Research

OTTAWA (April 27, 2006) - Dr. Alan Bernstein, President of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), along with CIHR's Governing Council, announced today the appointment of Dr. Colleen M. Flood as incoming Scientific Director of CIHR's Institute of Health Services and Policy Research (CIHR-IHSPR). This appointment is effective September 1, 2006.

Dr. Flood is currently an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto and a Canada Research Chair in Health Law and Policy. She completed her Master of Laws (LL.M.) in 1994 and her Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.) in 1998 at the University of Toronto. Her areas of research interest include comparative health care policy, public/private financing of health care systems, health care reform, and accountability and governance issues. She was the 1999 Labelle Lecturer in Health Services Research and was appointed a Senior Fellow of Massey College in 2004 and in 2006 on to the Corporation of Massey College.




http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/content/abstract/164/6/825
The illegality of private health care in Canada
Colleen M. Flood and Tom Archibald
Dr. Flood is Assistant Professor and Mr. Archibald is a doctoral candidate, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont.


Abstract

WE ADDRESSED THE QUESTION OF WHETHER PRIVATE HEALTH CARE IS ILLEGAL in Canada by surveying the health insurance legislation of all 10 provinces. Our survey revealed multiple layers of regulation that seem to have as their primary objective preventing the public sector from subsidizing the private sector, as opposed to rendering privately funded practice illegal. Private insurance for medically necessary hospital and physician services is illegal in only 6 of the 10 provinces. Nonetheless, a significant private sector has not developed in any of the 4 provinces that do permit private insurance coverage. The absence of a significant private sector is probably best explained by the prohibitions on the subsidy of private practice by public plans, measures that prevent physicians from topping up their public sector incomes with private fees.


Friendly influenced? Note date of start September 2006. Does anyone know more about Dr. Flood and her inclinations?
 
Cannabis Seed Wedding Bands
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
blahblah said:
Pray tell me more Ditto

man slut: If he did he oughta help Harper!


Its kind of making fun of the fact that Layton used a private clinic for a hernia operation a couple of years ago and claimed no knowledge of it during the last election. Its not actually all that significant just a way of poking some fun at Layton cause I don't much like him.
 

blahblah

TRIBE Member
Ditto Much said:
Its kind of making fun of the fact that Layton used a private clinic for a hernia operation a couple of years ago and claimed no knowledge of it during the last election. Its not actually all that significant just a way of poking some fun at Layton cause I don't much like him.

He doesn't inspire me much either. Well it is probably a relief that he got that end taken care of don't you think?:O
 

judge wopner

TRIBE Member
Ditto Much said:
Its kind of making fun of the fact that Layton used a private clinic for a hernia operation a couple of years ago and claimed no knowledge of it during the last election. Its not actually all that significant just a way of poking some fun at Layton cause I don't much like him.



ditto,

we have went over this a million times before,

the Shouldice Clinic which Mr. Layton went to is not a private clinic. any money it gathers above the provincial rates for its procedures are given back to the provence.

they started out around WW2 for quick fix hernias for troops and would be troops to get them ready for enrolement.

canadian citizens dont pay to go to the Shouldice clinic, its just hard to get abooking there because they are so good at what they do. which is in total defiance of the notion that canada lacks cutting edge medicine because its a public system.
 
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
judge wopner said:
ditto,

we have went over this a million times before,


Yes we have and I regretted posting it again when I did. Total mistake on my part I'll ask D to edit it out if it becomes to much of a distraction, I'll admit I was just being a dick.
 

judge wopner

TRIBE Member
this is an intersting topic because it comes in many different forms:

the legal question of private health care will examine the in's and out's of various law but misses the point entirely which is the intent of the Health Accord: to provide public health care of good quality to all Canadians.

everything else is just legal conjecture, its clear w/ the recent supreme court deciison that the law can be circumvented to allow fro private payment of otherwise public services, but finding a legal loophole in child pornography laws to get a dude off the hook doesnt mean the intent of the laws and what they hoped to acheive are being honoured.

canada already has tons of private health care, many services are not covered and the list is only growing. there are massive grey areas in health care administraiton that allow private clinics to exist, especially in quebec.

its odd that private health care is seen as an alberta imperitive because they have so much cash but it has been quebec for the longest time that has demanded private health care and their own supreme court fired the first salvo in this debate w/ the Chaoulli decision http://www.casselsbrock.com/publicationdetail.asp?aid=812

the issue in my mind should be less of a legal one and more of a social policy one where we look at how our medical needs are being met and if there is enough public funds to maintain an adequate system that was drafted up during a time where health costs were a much smaller share of GDP than today.
 
Last edited:

judge wopner

TRIBE Member
oh forgot to add:

the supreme court justifiably felt that in a 2 teir system there exists less pressure on the wealthies element of the nation to ensure the public system is strong because they can simply pay top dollar for the best care. in a largely public system all but the richest who go to the US or specialty clinics generally use the public system, giving more weight to ensuring it remains strong.
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
judge wopner said:
everything else is just legal conjecture, its clear w/ the recent supreme court deciison that the law can be circumvented to allow fro private payment of otherwise public services, but finding a legal loophole in child pornography laws to get a dude off the hook doesnt mean the intent of the laws and what they hoped to acheive are being honoured.


Did you just compare child pornography to private medical care?
 
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders

blahblah

TRIBE Member
Thanks judge for the extra hernia info -- leave the post Ditto it's reassuring to see you can admit to being a reactionary goof at times.

Judge... in light of your comments about costing less, GDP, etc, what do you make of these?

http://www.manumilitari.net/?cat=13
English Graphs French comments

Source of above

The U.S. Health Care Divide: Disparities in Primary Care Experiences by Income
http://www.cmwf.org/publications/publications_show.htm?doc_id=364437

Gaps in Health Insurance: An All-American Problem
http://www.cmwf.org/publications/publications_show.htm?doc_id=367876

More privatization means higher costs and higher error rates.

In the US:

40% of middle class people have no insurance.
20% of peeple had to borrow money to be treated.
60% of people with chronic illnesses don't have the means to pay for their medications.
 
Top