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Progressive Bhangra

coleridge

TRIBE Member
Why is this concept too difficult for bhangra heads to understand?

It's simply bhangra with moody progressive parts. Bhangra with some synths.

The techno community has no problem accepting the term progressive techno .... or at least they don't after the prog heads embarassed them into submission.

Or maybe the bhangra guys are super protective ... much like how the freestyle puirits get all offended when they're told that their music will never be good enough for any DJs to play.

Collaberations between producers like BT and the Safri Boys, John Digweed, and Punjabi MC and Shaktee and Luke Fair, are defining this style as I type. This music is here to stay.

Keep an eye out for the back-to-back stylings of DJ Gopal and Sasha on next month's essential mix.

Progressive Bhangra for ever!
 
Stop Bill C-10

Gizmo

TRIBE Member
How you can mention bhangra without any reference to Suke-bir, the prince of Bhangra is beyond me.

Back in the day when no one gave a shit about it, Suke and I were defending the scene. Where were you guys on those cold winter nights when we flyering outside Bombay Palace? Nothing more humiliating than having old chicken vindaloo thrown at you to get you off the premises.

Or our hit show on CFMT, the "Delhi-Belly Hour", every Sunday morning. We were showcasing the latest in slick bhangra sounds.
then lombardi (r.i.p.) sent his goons over cos we were a threat to his monopoly.

case in point, we can't be stopped. the bhangra revolution is alive and well.

Anyways, it's here to stay. Welcome to the right side Matt.
 
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Gizmo

TRIBE Member
http://www.indianj.com/interviews/sukhbir.asp

an interview with Suke. the king of bhangra.

sukhbir2.jpg


The Bhangra artist known as 'Sukhbir' has another hit song 'Ishq' and has released his latest album 'Hai Energy'. He has performed to fans in packed venues in over 13 countries. He writes his own music and sings his own songs. He doesn't have a political message, he just loves to entertain. He is definitely not a 'One hit wonder' and it doesn't seem like he will fade away soon.

Indianj.com found out were he's coming from and were he is planning to go.

Interview by Satinder


Q. So Sukhbir why didn't you pursue a career as a doctor, engineer or computer programmer?

I was actually pursuing a career in Information Technology but I guess music was my destiny. Actually, I guess things changed for me when I met Gizmo in Kenya, who suggested that I take music professionally, and there was also the support of my family, my dad in particular who really is the backbone of my present career.


Q. Did you ever think 'Sukhbir' would be as big as he is when you recorded your first song?

Not at all. I was honestly just messing around when I was recording my first song. I had absolutely no idea about the Indian pop scene, I recorded the song, a video was shot, the next thing I remember was the album sold a hell of a lot.I was in total shock. But you must keep in mind that it is not a single persons' effort that spells success. I mean, everyone down the line matters, right from my parents blessings, to the financier, the engineer, producer, tea boy, A&R Manager, secretary, the record company, THE FANS !


Q. What part of India is your family originally from and did you visit India during your childhood?

My family is from a little village known as "Dalli" which is in the district of Jallandhar, in the northern state of Punjab in India. During my childhood, visits to India were not that often, after I left India, I remember going back on four occasions in the span of 20 years.


Q. How did you keep a keen interest in speaking Punjabi since you grew up in Kenya? Are your parents and family supportive of your music?

I guess my father being a priest in the Sikh Temple in Kenya really helped, we always spoke Punjabi at home, all my Punjabi friends spoke Punjabi, most of my gujrati friends also spoke Punjabi, my dreams were also in Punjabi. My Parents and family have always been very supportive towards my music, despite the fact that I come from a very religious family, so much so, that my dad also pens most of my songs.


Q. Tell me a couple of 'High point' that has come out your success. What award that you received means to most to you?

The high point was when my first album was nominated for the best debut album, I was nominated for the best male singer, The video of 'Punjabi munde' was nominated for the best video.


Q. Were has your best concert been?
The best Concert must have been the one in Chandhigarh !

sukhbir3.jpg



Q. Any famous people that you keep in touch with since your success?

Jeetendra, The BIG B, Rakesh Roshan, Neelam, Rajesh Roshan, Anu Malik, Pankaj Udhas, Moorty, DalerJI, Lucky Ali, Jaaved Jaffrey, Fluffy.


Q. Out of all your songs which one makes you smile the most when you hear it and why?

GAL BAN GAYEE ! I guess its because a very special person 'helped' me write it !


Q. Who are some musicians that you followed?

I followed quite a few singers ranging from M.J. (Michael Jackson), Bob Marley, Jagjit Singh, Lataji, Ashaji, to Def Leopard, , ooooooops !! not too sure about the last one.......


Q. Is your music a blend from any other musician? Who do you think is the pioneer to the type of music you produce?

My music is a blend of many different styles, but I try to keep the 'Bhangra' element a little more dominant than the other styles. The pioneers to the kind of music that I produce have got to be all the Punjabi bands in the U.K. like Alaap, Heera, D.C.S, Sahotas, Malkit Singh, Bill Singh Clinton.


Q. If a DJ in London or Canada or the USA remixed one of your songs and put on his CD.. How would you react?

It has been done many times, but unfortunately not legally, If the re-mix is good, then I guess I'll let him/her walk.....But if its awful, then I'll sue the ú!*$ out of them ! Just kiddin' but a word of advise to all those D.J's doing that kind of a thing, if you release an album officially through a record label, you will surely reap the benefits !
 

fleaflo

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Gizmo
How you can mention bhangra without any reference to Suke-bir, the prince of Bhangra is beyond me.
Back in the day when no one gave a shit about it, Suke and I were defending the scene. Where were you guys on those cold winter nights when we flyering outside Bombay Palace? Nothing more humiliating than having old chicken vindaloo thrown at you to get you off the premises.

I am disgusted that you have forgotten about my tribute to the one like Suke-bir.

May your prize elephant eat your sitar and suffer splintered diarrhea for many moons.
 
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Suke

TRIBE Member
EAR TO THE GROUND

I just wanna give akaal (respect) to Coleridge for holding the fort. Like my partner Gizmo stated ... We started this "ish" back in the day and were being laughed at. Now look at "diggers" tryin' to get in on the ca$h money :eek:. <----------- probably won't work


We Don't Play. Bhangra is here. It ain't goin' nowhere, it can't be stopped now ... 'cause its BadBoy for life. Keep your eyes open "prog" heads and keep your ears to the ground.

*realize*


According to a folk tradition, Bhangra comes from Bhaungra, which means action on land, activity on land. Whatever one does on land, with land is Bhangra. Bhangra through dance expresses all human endeavor with nature and with each other. Whatever one does for production and reproduction of life, Bhangra reflects it through dance.

According to another tradition, farmers and their families, in celebration of a good harvest drink Bhang, (Siva's herb), and dance, this dance is called Bhangra. This dance is in thanksgiving to mother earth, Bhaun, and celebration of their own endeavor and effort, their own hardwork and toil. Peasants and farmers in Punjab are seen even now at Vaisakhi, the first day of harvest drinking and dancing, doing Bhangra in the fields, villages and lanes.

Another folk tradition claims that the whole creation was started by Mahadev-Siva, by the three beats Da, Da, Da from his hand drum - Damroo. Everything in this cosmos came into being with these three beats. Bhangra also started with these beats, from Bhu- to be. It is for this reason that even today the Dholi, (Drummer), starts Bhangra with three beats. Since Bhangra has been with creation right from the beginning, it also reflects Maya - the world and its Awagaman, (coming into being and fading away). This tradition is closer to the classical Indian tradition according to which, Jag and Jog, (world and Yoga), Geet and Sangeet, (Music), Nrtya and Naach, (Dance), are creations of Siva and that's why he is also called Natraj-king of all dancers. Bhangra through dance shows relations of humans with nature and relations of humans with each other.


Punjabis are seen doing Bhangra in preparation of war with Alexander under the banner of Porus. In these Bhangras they show their preparation, valor and determination to cut the enemy into pieces. During the times of Gorakhnath, the great yogi, Punjabis did Bhangra at weddings, Melas, (fairs), and other occasions.

Bhangra is an integral part of Punjab and its people. Through its movements and actions it reveals the zits-im-leben, the life situation of Punjab. It is for this reason that it is called the Shaan of Punjab. An old Bhangra Boli says :-


Bhangra tells the tale of the Punjabis and especially the life in villages. It shows how a day begins with dawn, farmers get their oxens and implements ready to go to the fields. They toil on the land by tilling it, leveling it, weeding it, watering it, sowing the seed, protecting it from animals and birds, harvesting it, loading it on the carts and taking it to the Mandi, fighting with Arhtiyas in the Mandi. Boliyan (lyrics) of Bhangra describe all this graphically.

With the changing times the themes and stories acted out in Bhangra have also changed. With the rise of Patriarchy and Brahmanical order, only men started participating in Bhangra. Women were taken out of it and confined to the four walls of the house or doing chores such as bringing water from the well or taking food to the fields for men. This change is also reflected in Bhangra. In Bhangra scenes also, women are shown doing these chores such as churning the milk, going to the well, going to the fields with food for men. Under new conditions, when the ruination and exploitation of peasantry by excessive taxation by local kings and marauders invading Punjab became order of the day, Bhangras also depicted these conditions. During the time of Akbar, Dulla Bhatti and his friends are doing Bhangra to celebrate their revolt against Akbar. Since then Eulogy of Dulla Bhatti, Jaimal Fatta and their exploits against Akbar became integral part of Bhangra as reflected in the Boliyan.

Boliyan, (lyrics), describe conditions in verse, and the actions of Bhangra act these out. Boliyan describe conditions of the people, farmers and villagers. For instance that part of Heer Waris Shah has become integral part of Bhangra, in which he describes the break of dawn in a village:-

Birds chirp, traveler afoot, milk is being churned
Blessed morning with its red dawn has awakened everyone with its tickle
One is up and churning, another washing the churning stick
Men ready with their oxen and plough to tackle the land
Women are grinding grain for flour to make Rotis
Whole world is busy, young girls are spinning at the wheel.


Most of the Bhangras in Punjab start with this Boli, which describes life very graphically. Boliyan from Mirza Sahiban, Jugni, Chhalla and other folk songs have become part of Bhangra. They describe conditions of agriculturists, villagers, and their struggles in nature and society. After the occupation of Punjab by the British, Punjabi peasants gave rise to a movement called Pagrdi Sambhal Jatta, (Defend your dignity), to protest against the execssive revenue collection by the new rulers and their henchmen. This song became the song of the Punjabi peasantry and was sung in villages and towns. It also became part of Bhangra. Bhangra depicted the condition of peasants buried under the weight of debt, being born in debt and dyeing in debt. The Boli says:-

Our fate is imprisoned in the thick book
Of the money lender with a red ribbon.
Pagrdi Sambhal Jatta, Pagrdi Sambhal Oye
Loot Gya Maal Tera, Loot Gya Maal Oye
(Arise and take control of your turban, your dignity, you are being looted)
(You middleman, you are depraved
You yourself are thief and also are judge
You eat all that we produce with our toil
You are an evil fellow)


These Boliyan and other Boliyan from Jaago, (awakening), became part of Bhangra during the independence movement. Bhangras done by the students of Punjab University Lahore, Khalsa College Amritsar, DAV College Jullunder were expressions of their times. Bhangras performed at the Kisan rallies in Tobha Tek Singh, Gujranwala were well acclaimed and appreciated. These Bhangras expressed the spirit of their times. In these Bhangras new themes and elements such as tractors, thrashers, trains, trucks, motors, tubewells, going outside Punjab in search of employment were also evident. For instance the following Boliyan show the conditions of Punjab at this time:

(Oh you Drummer, my friend, play one more beat on the drum
Awaken my land which is asleep)
(Allah give us clouds, give us rain, Allah give us clouds)
(Oh my strong oxen, till the land well
We are going to sow weapons)
(Our land is like gold and water like silver
Bone breaking toil we do but still have nothing to show)
(The days to guard our crop from the birds, animals and thieves
Are over, look harvest time is here)
(They do not give a damn to us weak and poor
Justice is only for the strong and rich)


Partition of Punjab had its impact on Bhangra also. In west Punjab, it is said Bhangra has been reduced to minimum. When coeducation in East Punjab was started, men and women started doing Bhangra once again. But it has remained confined to the Bhangras of colleges in cities. The conditions of life in Punjab, in countryside were reflected in these Bhangras. The annual Bhangra championships held at the Punajb univetrsity Chandigarh, Punjabi University Patiala, Guru Nanak University Amritsar, produced and performed some of the best Bhangras. The Struggle for Punjabi Suba, struggle against prosperity levy, new technology, green revolution, Naxalbari movement, Morcha against Emergency, they all were reflected in these Bhangras. For instance, instead of using the bullock cart, grain is taken in a tractor trolley to the market. Bhangras depicted this changing world and relations. In the Bhangras of the villages and schools, these Bhangra deeply reflect the situation in Punjab in the last decade and half. Bhangras at Jor Melas, Chapar Mela, Roshni Mela, Guga Mela, wrestling Melas and other countryside festivals depict the tragic events of last few years. These Bhangras have popular themes of Dulla Bhatti and his fight against Akbar, Fight against Aurangzeb and valour of Punjabis against oppression.

In last few years commercialization of Bhangra began with the explosion of the entertainment industry. In the commercialized Bhangra, Bhangra has no relation to Bhaun, land and the life of which it is an expression. It is marketed as a product for entertainment. It is a commodity, bought and sold in the global entertainment market. These Bhangras have no theme or story to tell, of a people and their land. It no longer is connected with Bhaun. It does not reflect their weal or woe, joy or celebrations.

Abroad this Bhangra was marketed by music corporations as a source of revenue in the form of cassettes and CDs. South Asians abroad, who have been victims of racism and racist violence and denied their national and cultural heritage, welcomed this as a step towards asserting and affirming their culture and identity. Commercial Bhangra groups came into being in UK and other places and performed this commercial Bhangra. But Several Bhangra groups also came into being in UK, US, Canada and other places whom wanted to maintain the integrity and dignity of Bhangra and Punjab. Some of these group wanted to go back to some pristine Bhangra with a feeling of nostalgia. Others wanted to develop Bhangra under the new conditions of Diaspora, expressing these new conditions in actions and Boliyan of Bhangra. They depicted the conditions of Punjabis abroad and their struggles in new lands for dignity and livelihood:
 

loopdokter

TRIBE Promoter
Just watch out for my progressive stormer remix of 'Chok Teh' (sp?) by Apache Indian coming to a white label near you. Dark drums galore with a little Bolleywood thrown in for good measure!

Ta(bla),
Jay
 

LukeF

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by loopdokter
Just watch out for my progressive stormer remix of 'Chok Teh' (sp?) by Apache Indian coming to a white label near you. Dark drums galore with a little Bolleywood thrown in for good measure!

Ta(bla),
Jay


Chup raho chotaa sa ladka!
 
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Suke

TRIBE Member
Re: EAR TO THE GROUND

The most two important paragraphs in this whole thread. *realize*


Originally posted by Suke


last few years commercialization of Bhangra began with the explosion of the entertainment industry. In the commercialized Bhangra, Bhangra has no relation to Bhaun, land and the life of which it is an expression. It is marketed as a product for entertainment. It is a commodity, bought and sold in the global entertainment market. These Bhangras have no theme or story to tell, of a people and their land. It no longer is connected with Bhaun. It does not reflect their weal or woe, joy or celebrations.

Abroad this Bhangra was marketed by music corporations as a source of revenue in the form of cassettes and CDs. South Asians abroad, who have been victims of racism and racist violence and denied their national and cultural heritage, welcomed this as a step towards asserting and affirming their culture and identity. Commercial Bhangra groups came into being in UK and other places and performed this commercial Bhangra. But Several Bhangra groups also came into being in UK, US, Canada and other places whom wanted to maintain the integrity and dignity of Bhangra and Punjab. Some of these group wanted to go back to some pristine Bhangra with a feeling of nostalgia. Others wanted to develop Bhangra under the new conditions of Diaspora, expressing these new conditions in actions and Boliyan of Bhangra. They depicted the conditions of Punjabis abroad and their struggles in new lands for dignity and livelihood:

Loop ... it means "Keep quiet you son of a bitch"

Hear the drummer get WicKed:

exportImage.asp


Chuk Dhey Phattay ==========================> Suke.
 

*SiLver*RoBoT*

TRIBE Member
Actually there's a monthly event at Fez - the last one was last friday, which I've been meaning to check out...

malika shara - one of the dj's that came out to the night I threw in Mississauga back in Feb, was spreading the word.

Bhangra is everywhere. Bhangra is for the soul.

*over*and*out*

*SiLver*RoBoT*
 

Suke

TRIBE Member
FIN-ALLY Suke Has come BACK ... To The Progressive Forum :eek:

If Ambaraish and I said it, we meant it, bite our tongues for no one .. Call us e-vil or un-believable :eek:

So I'm sure you all know about Punjabi MC and Jay-Z. Now Beenie Man wants to hook up with PMC as well. You got Nas with an Indian vocal / beat on his new track and tons of other Indian samples.

New School Fusion.

HOLLA ... If ya hear me :eek:
 
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chemi11

TRIBE Member
Finally, Suke has come back to the "prog room". It's been to long. PPL havent laughed like that in a long time.
Bhangra Forever.
Mike
 

EffinHard

TRIBE Member
Not everyone understands Bhangra Music, Its a spiritual thing, a body thing, a soul thing my friend.

okay, im going to hell for that.
 
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Suke

TRIBE Member
Gizmo and I told you so. Now can you dig THAT .................................. Suckkkaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhh?



The rise and rise of 'desi' beats
(Filed: 13/09/2003)


British Asian music's false dawn in the '90s has given way to a vibrant new sound, says Raj Kaushal


The vibrant British Asian music of today isn't about spiritual sitar sounds, Bollywood beats or cheesy chill-out tunes hidden away in the "world music" section. The new urban Asian sound is pure, populist dance music and everyone is moving to it… even Britney Spears.

This has been more than an Indian summer - it has been an Indian year. It seems that Britain is enjoying all things Asian at the moment, be it in fashion, film, television, radio, theatre or literature. But it is in music that the most interesting and influential developments are taking place. After kicking its heels around on the outside of British dance culture for more than a decade, the sound of urban Asian dance music has finally made it into the club and everyone is going mad for it.

"The mainstream music industry can't decide what to call the music we make," says Manchester-based producer Surinder Rattan. "We know it as bhangra - but I've heard it called `urban Asian music', and I've heard it called `desi beats' [desi is a Hindi word meaning `real' or `authentic', now used as a catch-all term for British Asian]."

Rattan's new album, featuring two hotshot MCs called Metz & Trix, is set to give another boost to Asian-influenced dance music. "Whatever they're calling it, the industry have decided they want a slice of it. But this is a music they refused to listen to for years. In the past, record executives wouldn't even slam the door in our faces, let alone open it. But after the recent Panjabi MC Top 5 hit and the Asian-influenced tunes coming from top American producers such as Dr Dre and Timbaland , they're saying how much they love our work."

While Panjabi MC's hit earlier this year, Mundian To Bah Ke, may have pushed this fresh urban Asian sound into the spotlight, it was the support and interest shown from the urban music scene in America that proved to be the catalyst in helping it cross over into the British mainstream. The likes of Missy Elliot and Jay-Z have sampled Asian tracks to great commercial success, as Mushtaq, one of the hottest British Asian producers, explains.

"The emergence of an ethnic influence in urban dance music is primarily because music operates within a limited circle of trends," he says. "The complacency of that circle forces producers to look elsewhere, resulting in producers such as Timbaland buying bhangra records, being influenced by them and consequently creating Get Ur Freak On, one of the biggest R&B hits of recent times. Devotees of urban music in the UK have always been disciples of the Americans - and so this is the ultimate accolade."

This endorsement from trendsetting musicians in America means that major record labels are now rushing to sign up young British Asian producers. People such as Rishi Rich, Punjabi Hit Squad, Dr Zeus, Sukshinder Shinda, RDB and, of course, Panjabi MC could soon become household names as they are asked to remix eastern beats into releases by some of the West's biggest pop stars.

Rishi Rich, whose new single Dance With You is expected to enter the Top 40 tomorrow, has already persuaded Craig David to sing in Punjabi on his most recent single, Spanish, and has just spiced up Ricky Martin's new single, Juramento. In addition, Rich has remixed Britney Spears's forthcoming single after she also suddenly discovered a love for bhangra, folk music from Punjab traditionally played at harvest time.

This new desi sound has depth and is very different from the "cool" Asian music of the mid 1990s, described at the time as Asian Underground. Whereas that was hyped by the mainstream media and championed by a small, fashionable western audience, the sound of Talvin Singh and his trendy tablas was alien to most British Asians. This new sound is real - you would hear it at a British Asian wedding. It is pukka party music that has evolved from the British Asian experience, a sound that has been developing in clubs for more than a decade. Most importantly, it has strong grass-roots support and will continue to exist even if the current craze for it passes.

Radio 1 has dedicated a new weekly urban Asian show to the bhangra scene. "At last we have music that represents and fits into the worlds of hip hop and R&B where most British Asians choose to rave," says one of the hosts, DJ Nihal from Bobby Friction and Nihal Presents. "It is original dance music from the streets, from the inner cities, that has the same passion and authenticity as hip hop, drum and bass or ragga."

It appears that urban Asian music has grown beyond its core audience and transcended skin colour. Black and white musical influences have blended with Asian sounds so seamlessly that it isn't unusual to hear it played in mainstream clubs where there are no Asians. The days of Asian music conjuring up twangy sitars have passed, a fact highlighted by Marky Mark, a white DJ involved in the British bhangra scene for the past 10 years who co-hosts a radio show on the BBC's 1Xtra station. "That whole `exotic' thing is patronising," he says. "Asian culture is part of the fabric of British society and Asian music is part of the urban scene."
 

Suke

TRIBE Member
http://www.canada.com/vancouver/vancouversun/news/story.html?id=57e546c0
-406a-4f21-8892-cabd934688ee

'Six Feet Under'
Daughter of Vancouver Sikh leader nabbed in U.S. ecstasy sting, allegedly tells agents how family runs gang. Do it our way, or you're ...'Six Feet Under'

Kim Bolan
Vancouver Sun

July 7, 2005

A Vancouver woman with connections to the B.C. NDP and federal Liberal party has been arrested in Seattle and charged with trafficking ecstasy after a four-week sting involving the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency.

Ravinderjit Kaur Puar, who is also known as Ravinderjit Kaur Shergill, was captured on tape saying she was involved in the sale of ecstasy and marijuana and also said she did not want any "heat" because both she and her father are politicians, according to U.S. court documents.

"We don't drop our weed off here. We take it all the way to California," Puar was also quoted in the documents as saying.

Puar ran unsuccessfully earlier this year for the NDP nomination in Vancouver-Kensington, which was won by David Chudnovsky, who went on to win in the May provincial election.

She was also elected as a Liberal party delegate for Paul Martin's leadership team in the fall of 2003, but did not end up attending the convention.

Puar's father, Kalwant Singh Puar, is on the executive of Vancouver's Ross Street Sikh temple. He has been a high-profile supporter of federal Health Minister Ujjal Dosanjh.

Kalwant Puar did not return phone calls Wednesday. A person answering at the south Vancouver home hung up on a Sun reporter.

Neither Chudnovsky nor anyone from the federal Liberals wanted to comment when contacted Wednesday.

Other members of the Ross Street executive also declined to comment, but said Puar's father was on his way to Seattle.

The DEA got a tip from a confidential source June 1 that Puar was looking to sell tens of thousands of ecstasy tablets, including designer drugs made in Vancouver.

Using undercover agents, the DEA spent four weeks attending various meetings with Puar and her associates at restaurants in the Seattle area.

The DEA agent asked her if he could purchase just 1,000 pills to start, but Puar insisted on a minimum order of 5,000, the documents said.

She also offered to send a driver to Portland with pills, but the DEA agent said he preferred to deal with her, prompting Puar to say her drivers had been working for her for 10 years.

"They don't f--- around with me because ... they will be f---ing six feet under and they know it, because my, you know what, brothers will put them six feet under.

"Yeah, it's that simple. That's what the game is like in Vancouver. You f--- with us, you die. Well I don't know if you listen to the news and stuff. In Vancouver ... you pay for it and you know how bad you pay for it."

She said that is why no one rats out other gang members involved in drugs: "No one talks to the cops. If you're in jail with this person, you have a family member out there."

The court papers said Puar first provided the agent with 2,700 "blue dolphin" pills that cost $3.50 each US.

Puar maintained phone contact and held meetings with the DEA agent throughout June, offering 15,000 ecstasy pills ranging in price from $3.50 to $5 US each.

In one meeting, she claimed "her family organization 'has it very well with the cops' and that police in Vancouver, B.C. work for the organization as her father is very well connected politically," the documents said.

When the DEA agent told Puar that his sister had recently been beaten up, the Vancouver woman offered to have the person who did the assault "taken care of," the documents said.

Puar said six of her cousins have been killed in gangland violence in Vancouver.

She claimed she was overseeing the production of a new "Ferrari" pill which was being made especially for her group to distribute, the documents said.

The DEA said Puar promised to deliver 15,000 ecstasy pills by June 30, but called on June 28 to say she was a little behind schedule.

"Puar explained that her family had been busy with wedding plans and so had not had time to make all 15,000 pills. Puar said she would have the additional pills ready a few days later," the documents said.

On June 30, as she was delivering nine small bags of ecstasy pills to the DEA agent, Puar was arrested with two associates. A third associate was arrested a short time later.

Puar remains in custody near Seattle but will have a bail hearing this afternoon. Also charged are Kamaljit Singh Ghag, Sarbjit Singh Virk and Sarbjit Singh Sandhu.
 
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