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pretty big fire somewhere near the annex...

Alex D. from TRIBE on Utility Room

screamy

TRIBE Member
Wow, that is pretty big - lots of trucks responded, it's at least a three-alarmer if I've done my math correctly.
 
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emigre

TRIBE Member
My favourite site on the whole internet!

(I think I hear additional trucks responding to that fire now.)
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
i've been hearing them for the last half hour.. gonna go snag some pics (just down the street from me)
 
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Astroboy

TRIBE Member
It's a Century home on Bedford just south of Dupont. The roof collapsed in about 6 mins ago, the home is a total loss. Firefighters are working to ensure it doesn't spread to neighbouring homes...
 

screamy

TRIBE Member
Looks like they might be worried about it going to a four-alarmer, they've got a Command vehicle out there and have pulled trucks from all over the place, from Bloor and Sherbourne to Front Street and all over in between.

I can't remember which hall dvs is with, but I'm pretty sure it's in South Command. He could be fighting that fire right now.

(and thanks ila!)
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
Ok i beat just about every media outlet with the shots i got.. right up there with the firefighters.. my camera is wet and my clothes reek of plastic smoke.. but disaster porn shots are coming soon.
 
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screamy

TRIBE Member
H2Whoa said:
when someone says 3 alarm fire does that mean the alarms are ringing at 3 firestations?
Fires are sometimes categorized as one-alarm, two-alarm, three-alarm fires, or higher. The number of alarms correlates with the level of response by local authorities, with an elevated number of alarms indicating increased commitment of resources. The term multiple-alarm is a quick way of indicating that a fire was severe and difficult to contain. This system of classification is common among both fire departments and consequently news agencies

The initial dispatch is referred to as the first alarm and is typically the largest. Subsequent alarms are calls for additional units as needed, usually because the fire has grown and additional resources are needed to combat it or the incident is taking long enough that firefighters on scene need to be replaced due to exhaustion. The number of alarms doesn't necessarily indicate the size or the severity of the actual blaze so much as the size of the incident and how long and hard the fire department had to work to control it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiple-alarm_fire

It has to do with the commitment of FD resources - so a one-alarm would be a "simple" call with, for example, only one or two trucks required, like for a minor medical call.

That six-alarmer we had on Queen a few months back would have involved at least double the number of resources. I know more about the US than I do Canada when it comes to Fire Services, though, so our alarm system might be a little different than theirs.

Halls vary in size and, to the best of my knowledge, usually have at least a pumper and a hook & ladder truck (I'm not sure if we have different terminology here in Canada though). Some stations also have an aerial tower truck, but I don't think they all do in Toronto, those mothers are expensive.

This particular fire has over 15 halls involved, and from all over the place in South Command (and elsewhere). But of course, the guys who respond first get tired and have to be relieved periodically, which is why sometimes it looks like they're standing around doing nothing - they're resting so they don't collapse and create further rescue issues (to say nothing of staying healthy and alive!).
 
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