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Pre-set Tipping Amounts

stryker

TRIBE Member
Along with products getting smaller for the same price, one of the side effects I've noticed with food costs increasing are my tip amounts.

...and now I've decided to unilaterally implement a new system. Pre-set tipping amounts.


It really all boils down to how much a think their service is worth vs the amount being a percentage of the total bill. I've had all sorts of food service jobs over the years and I know full well what amount of work is involved and although I do value the service being performed, rising costs and dietary restrictions have made me reconsider my entire approach to tipping. I believe the current model is totally out of whack.

My wife and I are the "eat and run" type. 25 mins max at the table. We hardly ever send food back and IMO are what I would consider to be the ideal customer. No special orders, no hassles, low maintenance. $5 should be a more than adequate amount to make 4 trips to our table (take orders, bring drinks, bring food, bring bill). Is walking 30 feet really worth more than a $1.25 per trip? Unless it's over a river of crocodiles, I don't think so.

Why should the server get a larger tip if I eat a steak instead of BLT or have a beer instead of a pop, wine instead of water, etc. In November we ordered steak twice. Once at Applebys the other at the Keg. The steak at the Keg cost around $32. The steak at Applebys cost $18. Clearly the quality was different but that's not my point here. My point is that both servers did the exact same job, serving essentially the exact same meals. The Keg bill ended up being $25 more expensive than the Applebys. The service levels at both places were comparable, the only difference being the girl at the Keg was cute and the girl at Applebys was in fact a middle aged woman.

If the bill is higher than $50 I'm assuming the reason is due to more food )appetizers, etc) and the amount reflects the additional amount of work.

Unless the meal can be expensed my new tipping structure is as follows: (only applies to a two person meal.)


$0-$45 =$5.00

$46-$80 = $8.00

$81- $100 =$10.00

$100+ TBD



I've decided that $5 is how much I'm willing to pay someone to serve an average meal for two regardless of the bill amount up to $50-ish.


Stew :)
 

sianspherica

TRIBE Member
I was at a place on Bloor called Famoso which is a Neopolitan pizza joint, like a less hip version of Pizzeria Libretto.

Anyways, their ordering system is that you read a menu and then go to a counter to place your order, then "servers" bring you your food and drink.

I kind of questioned why a 15% tip should exist in a place like that when you don't really have anyone waiting on you or discussing the food with you. You have to go to the counter yourself for any of that shit.
 

stryker

TRIBE Member
I was at a place on Bloor called Famoso which is a Neopolitan pizza joint, like a less hip version of Pizzeria Libretto.

Anyways, their ordering system is that you read a menu and then go to a counter to place your order, then "servers" bring you your food and drink.

I kind of questioned why a 15% tip should exist in a place like that when you don't really have anyone waiting on you or discussing the food with you. You have to go to the counter yourself for any of that shit.
exactly. It's not that I don't value the service but I think blindly tipping without any consideration for the value of the actual work involved is becoming silly. Especially when places are starting to have 20% presets.

$5 is a fair price to deliver two plates, two drinks, a bill and some bread.

stew
 

kuba

TRIBE Member
I like it buddy! I do!

I'm like you as well - in sub $100 places especially.

But I'll always be old school and generously overtip because of the horror stories I've heard from people who don't tip or massively undertip. Remember (as you know) they work for below minimum wage? (yeah choice, etc., comes into equation. ..) so they gotta earn their keep somehow.

I thought this thread would be about tipping before a service is given like: UBER and HAILO.
 

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
I was at a place on Bloor called Famoso which is a Neopolitan pizza joint, like a less hip version of Pizzeria Libretto.

Anyways, their ordering system is that you read a menu and then go to a counter to place your order, then "servers" bring you your food and drink.
The sounds like the Consumers Distributing of Pizza joints!
 
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acheron

TRIBE Member
hey now... at least on Hailo you can adjust the tip amount before you reach your destination (i.e. before the driver "completes" the trip)
 

sianspherica

TRIBE Member
The sounds like the Consumers Distributing of Pizza joints!
It's basically like Marche

in the sense that you have to order your food from a counter
you have to put your drink orders in at the counter

the only difference is they will carry your food and drinks to a table.

And that is worth the typical 15% tip? C'mon
 

RumRogerz

TRIBE Member
As a waiter, I feel as if you should know something about the service industry regarding your tipping rules. While my mentality on tips greatly differ from the average person, I do believe that you should tip whatever you want. I don't take any personal insult to it. People tip the way they tip and that's pretty much it.
But. One thing you may not realize is something called 'tipping out'. Tipping out is something that every server does at the end of the night. It's generally 5% -7% of sales. That money gets delegated to the help, hostess and kitchen staff. So as you mentioned... You leave $8 on an $80 bill. That's fine. At my restaurant, my tip out is 5.5%. So I actually see a bit less than $4 from that tip.
Kind of sucks. But that's the name of the game. If trends like this continue, good, knowledgable servers will slowly disappear into the ether. I've already started to see it happen. I go to a new spot and I'm served by a hipster who gives me attitude, lies to me about the wine he/she is trying to sell me and it's bloody insulting.
I feel that in the next 10 years you will find it hard to get proper service because the money just isn't there anymore. I got into this industry because I like my job, I love wine and love my food. The money was really good, but lately that has been changing.
All I ask is for you to consider the tip out. If you feel like leaving nothing as tip, at least leave enough for the server to cover his payout. Nothing feels worse than having to pay out of my own pocket for serving you
 

stryker

TRIBE Member
I feel that in the next 10 years you will find it hard to get proper service because the money just isn't there anymore. I got into this industry because I like my job, I love wine and love my food. The money was really good, but lately that has been changing.
All I ask is for you to consider the tip out.
sorry to be a bit of a dick about it...but there will never be a lack or servers. Just to be clear it's hard, grueling work that not many people can hack. But it's also an unskilled job that anyone with the right personality, and physical stamina can do. That's why it pays minimum wage. There's no shortage of people with no applicable skills looking for work that pays them out a wad of cash at the end of the night.


If I'm at a high end restaurant then I want someone seasoned and experienced, providing tier 1 service and I'll tip accordingly. But if the bill is under $100 a single digit to low double digit tip, IMO, is an accurate value for what is essentially 4 trips to my table.

It's that weird sweet spot that I'm trying to figure out. The girl serving me the Sunday brunch works her ass off and the bill ends up being under $20. I waay over tip her. But the pasta place on Yonge street isn't all that more difficult and I don't feel it deserves a higher tip. IMO the $40 - $70 bill is were I feel pre set tipping amounts level the playing field and would also ensure the Sunday brunch server doesn't get a $1.25 for doing the same job.



Kuba...totally agree with the over tipping. But most of the time we're in and out. It's probably the easiest money the person will make all day.

stew
 
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mitsuko souma

TRIBE Member
As a waiter, I feel as if you should know something about the service industry regarding your tipping rules. While my mentality on tips greatly differ from the average person, I do believe that you should tip whatever you want. I don't take any personal insult to it. People tip the way they tip and that's pretty much it.
But. One thing you may not realize is something called 'tipping out'. Tipping out is something that every server does at the end of the night. It's generally 5% -7% of sales. That money gets delegated to the help, hostess and kitchen staff. So as you mentioned... You leave $8 on an $80 bill. That's fine. At my restaurant, my tip out is 5.5%. So I actually see a bit less than $4 from that tip.
Kind of sucks. But that's the name of the game. If trends like this continue, good, knowledgable servers will slowly disappear into the ether. I've already started to see it happen. I go to a new spot and I'm served by a hipster who gives me attitude, lies to me about the wine he/she is trying to sell me and it's bloody insulting.
I feel that in the next 10 years you will find it hard to get proper service because the money just isn't there anymore. I got into this industry because I like my job, I love wine and love my food. The money was really good, but lately that has been changing.
All I ask is for you to consider the tip out. If you feel like leaving nothing as tip, at least leave enough for the server to cover his payout. Nothing feels worse than having to pay out of my own pocket for serving you
+1

We only see a portion of that tip. Every restaurant I've ever worked at, you are tipping out 2.5% - 5%. And it's not about the number of trips we have to make to your table. You are tipping for service and goods.
Even if the service is lacking I still leave 10-15%. It's just good karma.
 

mitsuko souma

TRIBE Member
And re. pre-set tipping amounts: some restaurants automatically add a 15% gratuity to any table of 6 or more people. We, the servers, have no say in that. If this is the case, it is crucial to let your party know that the gratuity has been added and leave it to their discretion if they want to leave more. I worked with a particularly shady waiter at Rivoli who wouldn't say a word to large parties about the add-on, and just let them tip him twice if they didn't notice.
 

kuba

TRIBE Member
a question for RumRogerz:

On average out of say 10 clients, what % of them would tip:

-average
-above
-below
-nothing at all

?

Curious what the breakdown is over the course of a night.
 

dirtbag

TRIBE Member
I am opposed to the entire practice of tipping.
Why should patrons be left with the burden of determining the wage of servers?
Restaurant owners should pay their staff a fair wage and pass the cost along to clients thorugh their menu pricing.
 
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Phat Buddha

TRIBE Member
At my restaurant, my tip out is 5.5%. So I actually see a bit less than $4 from that tip.
Kind of sucks..
so wait... if my bill is $40 and I leave $8, which is 23% of the food bill (before taxes were added).. the attitude is that it sucks, because you have to share the tip?
 

glych t.anomaly

TRIBE Member
i went to the Bier Market near Don Mills and Lawrence today.

i dont like being forced to tip what the establishment decides is required of me.

that is of course based upon that fact that when someone is serving you and doing a good job they deserve a better tip.

if they dont, i will still tip, but it may not be as much.

the one issue i would have with the establishments if they paid the servers a decent wage, and they work it into the pricing of the food, what is to prevent lackluster service if there is no incentive to get a ' tip '

yes its hypocritical in the sense that im not in the industry and if im having a bad day i still pretend to clients, but its generally of course over the phone or email.

servers handle your food, bring you drinks, cater to your moods, your allergies etc.
some do fantastic jobs and make ridiculous money in tips, other dont.

so i enjoy tipping, i enjoy letting someone know how good there service was via a gratuity, but i dont want the establishment to decide for me what that should be.

sooooo i wont be frequenting that place, not that i would as no one at the table was really impressed with the food for the cost.

the bier on the other hand, well you cant go wrong there.
hahah
 
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dirtbag

TRIBE Member
the one issue i would have with the establishments if they paid the servers a decent wage, and they work it into the pricing of the food, what is to prevent lackluster service if there is no incentive to get a ' tip '
termination of employment
And that incentive can mean other diners experience bad service.
I received poor service at a nice restaurant on the weekend after being placed in a section where a server was tending to a large party.
He was obviously focused on the table where he knew he would make more money.
Why should i receive service below that of someone else in the restaurant just because i wont be as potentially large a tip?
 

glych t.anomaly

TRIBE Member
termination of employment
And that incentive can mean other diners experience bad service.
I received poor service at a nice restaurant on the weekend after being placed in a section where a server was tending to a large party.
He was obviously focused on the table where he knew he would make more money.
Why should i receive service below that of someone else in the restaurant just because i wont be as potentially large a tip?
but then that calls into question , why was he terminated....? because the client thought he was slow?

and yes it does suck that you got shittier service due to how he was getting tipped from the large table vs you.

and that would be solved if the tip wasnt there as incentive, but then his overall service as a server may not be the quality it is due to lack of monetary incentive vs keeping your job.
 

rudebwoy

TRIBE Member
As a waiter, I feel as if you should know something about the service industry regarding your tipping rules. While my mentality on tips greatly differ from the average person, I do believe that you should tip whatever you want. I don't take any personal insult to it. People tip the way they tip and that's pretty much it.
But. One thing you may not realize is something called 'tipping out'. Tipping out is something that every server does at the end of the night. It's generally 5% -7% of sales. That money gets delegated to the help, hostess and kitchen staff. So as you mentioned... You leave $8 on an $80 bill. That's fine. At my restaurant, my tip out is 5.5%. So I actually see a bit less than $4 from that tip.
Kind of sucks. But that's the name of the game. If trends like this continue, good, knowledgable servers will slowly disappear into the ether. I've already started to see it happen. I go to a new spot and I'm served by a hipster who gives me attitude, lies to me about the wine he/she is trying to sell me and it's bloody insulting.
I feel that in the next 10 years you will find it hard to get proper service because the money just isn't there anymore. I got into this industry because I like my job, I love wine and love my food. The money was really good, but lately that has been changing.
All I ask is for you to consider the tip out. If you feel like leaving nothing as tip, at least leave enough for the server to cover his payout. Nothing feels worse than having to pay out of my own pocket for serving you
well put. i've worked in restaurants for 15+ years, and now am at a point where i stop worrying about getting under tipped. maybe that's because i'm older now, or because i work at a restaurant that has average cheques over $60/ person, so the money is usually good based on sales volume alone. we can't control what people leave, and i figure in the long run i've probably earned more for doing less (ie. opening a bottle of wine and getting tipped 15-20% on it). when i'm out for dinner myself, i over tip (as most 'industry' people tend to do), because an extra $5-10 out of my pocket isn't a huge deal, but might make that persons day who receives it.

c.
 

kuba

TRIBE Member
answer me this:

On average out of say 10 clients, what % of them would tip:

-average
-above
-below
-nothing at all

?

Curious what the breakdown is over the course of a night.
 

I_bRAD

TRIBE Member
Xbar would tip average, Xbar+/- 3sigma would tip above or below average, Xbar+/- >3sigma would tip nothing at all or close to it.
 
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