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Pot task force recommendations for legalization of weed in Canada

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
No home grown pot plants taller than 100 cm due to fire hazard is a key recommendation.

Pot task force recommends legal cannabis sales be limited to users 18 and over
Canadian government has promised to table legislation legalizing cannabis in spring 2017
By John Paul Tasker, CBC News Posted: Dec 13, 2016 8:58 AM ET Last Updated: Dec 13, 2016 12:26 PM ET


The task force appointed by Ottawa to study the legalization of marijuana said Tuesday that cannabis sales should be restricted to those 18 and older, with a personal possession limit of 30 grams. (Jim Young/Reuters)

A task force appointed by the Canadian government to study the legalization of marijuana determined Tuesday that sales should be restricted to those 18 and older, with a personal possession limit of 30 grams.

The Canadian Medical Association had recommended setting the age at 21, with strict limits on quantity and potency until 25. But the task force said higher age limits would simply drive young consumers into the hands of the black market, something the government hopes to actively discourage with its push to legalize pot.

Provinces and territories should, however, be provided with the flexibility to set their own age restrictions on purchasing the drug, the report said. The nine U.S. jurisdictions that have legalized marijuana sales have matched the age limit to the drinking age of 21.

"Now is the time to move away from a system that has, for decades, been focused on the prohibition of cannabis into a regulated legal market," said Anne McLellan, a former Liberal cabinet minister and chair of the task force.



'Now is the time to move away from a system that has, for decades, been focused on the prohibition of cannabis into a regulated legal market,' says former federal cabinet minister Anne McLellan, chair of the federal task force on legalizing and regulating pot. (CBC)

"I think we're all aware of the challenges and societal problems that the existing system has created," she said, pointing to the flourishing illicit market for the drug.

The government has promised to table legislation in spring 2017, but it could take much more time for the bill to be studied and eventually passed into law.

The task force said Tuesday that timing for legalization is the government's prerogative. "Timelines from this point on are up to the government of Canada."

Choke off organized crime
The report recommends Ottawa impose many of the same restrictions that currently apply to alcohol and tobacco sales, namely limits on advertising, to cannabis, to discourage use by young people.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said key objectives of the legislation are to keep marijuana out of the hands children and to choke off profits to organized crime.

While it says cannabis consumption for personal purposes should be legalized, the task force recommends criminal penalties for illicit production and for those trafficking the drug to youth and international markets. McLellan also said that during this "period of transition," existing laws that prohibit possession should be enforced until legislation is in place.






McLellan says time to legalize pot is now

Cannabis should be sold in storefront locations, the report said, but it recommends a ban of co-locating cannabis with alcohol and tobacco products, a blow to some provinces, like Ontario, which had hoped to sell marijuana in government-owned liquor stores. It also said cannabis products should be sold in plain packaging, as the Liberal government has promised to do with tobacco.

The report also suggests limits on the density of cannabis storefront operations, and regulations to keep them away from schools, community centres and public parks.

The task force did not recommend a set price for cannabis, but suggested higher taxes on cannabis with elevated levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the chemical responsible for most of marijuana's psychological effects, to discourage use.

Tax revenues generated from the sale of cannabis should be directed toward public education campaigns and further research on the health risks associated with consumption, the report recommended. It also said the government should help develop a body of research on the effects of cannabis-impaired driving.

McLellan said there is a dearth of scientific research on what the legal limits should be on consuming cannabis and operating a vehicle.






McLellan says education key to stop drug impaired driving

"This isn't going to be a new challenge created by legalisation," McLellan said. "Drug-impaired charges are being laid every day in courts across this country."

The Ontario Provincial Police and the RCMP are testing three roadside oral fluid testing devices to determine THC levels, the former minister said.

Potential boon
The task force suggested the current medical marijuana regime, set up after successive court challenges, be maintained for the time being.

In fact, it said the professional production techniques developed under the current system should be applied to the cultivation of cannabis for personal consumption, a potential boon for some producers who have been looking to cash in on a liberalized marijuana market.

However, McLellan said, the task force does not want to see production concentrated in the hands of only large producers.

"We heard from a great many parties that they wanted a diversity of producers, and we agree with that," she said, adding she hopes some black market producers will choose to bring their operations under the new legal regime.

Personal cultivation should also be maintained, the report recommended, but with a limit on four plants per home, and a height restriction of 100 cm to reduce fire risks.

Edible pot products will also be legalized but they must not be "appealing to children" and cannot mimic familiar food items or be packaged to look like candy.

The task force's recommendations are not binding on the government.

Nine members of the task force held roundtables with experts across the country, visited two U.S. states where pot is already legal and heard from about 28,000 Canadians through online consultations.



Download the report:
http://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/3237304/Framework-for-the-Legalization-and-Regulation-of.pdf
 

Brandon

TRIBE Member
It occurs to me that the most illicit things I've ever purchased were unlicensed DJ mixtapes.
 

Wiseman

TRIBE Member
looks like LCBO is going to be shut out as they are recommending not co-locating with alcohol and toboacco.
 
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Wiseman

TRIBE Member
will say it now, Dispensaries will not be part of the distribution network
Oh I agree especially considering I think the way this goes is the Fed gives guidelines to the provinces. Ontario I would expect would try to use the LCBO anyways or create another agency and set up stores. B
 

kyfe

TRIBE Member
Oh I agree especially considering I think the way this goes is the Fed gives guidelines to the provinces. Ontario I would expect would try to use the LCBO anyways or create another agency and set up stores. B
they could do what the banks did when they started selling insurance. They created stores within the bank the operated seperately (wink wink)
 

wickedken

TRIBE Member
Oh I agree especially considering I think the way this goes is the Fed gives guidelines to the provinces. Ontario I would expect would try to use the LCBO anyways or create another agency and set up stores. B
I'd rather than monopoly feed all that cash back to the province rather than some company making profit. Infrastructure funds!
 
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CiG

TRIBE Member
The task force did not recommend a set price for cannabis, but suggested higher taxes on cannabis with elevated levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the chemical responsible for most of marijuana's psychological effects, to discourage use.
I wonder how out to lunch they will be with the pricing.
 

Mondieu

TRIBE Member
Pseudo-legalization without full decriminalization is just another cash-grab by out-of-touch greed-heads. Have a look at who the major stakeholders are in "Tweed", et al. This hoke BS does NOTHING to curb the black market. They grow commercial grade garbage. Your curious mom might feel more comfortable trying it for the first time. ...but nobody's popping by your place with a menu of quality crafted products, options and knowledge. Have a look at the proposed penalties for contraband. Hardly "legalization". Just "commercialization". These jokers just want to make a buck and tell you that it's all about protecting children.

Now I'm gonna eat the rest of this and have a wee vape of the new Sativa juice I just got. Government isn't interested in helping me with any of that. Just the $$$ they can milk before the market opens up. Soon come. ;)


 
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