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People With Disabilities - Misconceptions

MoFo

TRIBE Member
So because I work with people with disabilities now as a part of my roster of clients, we got a full day of training the other day.
And I think I learned a lot. I'm hoping to sign up for more training but I am sure that everyone here either has a family member or a friend or a lover with a disability.

I was wondering if some of you can share some myths and truths?

For example, this is what I have learned so far:

A deaf lipreader only lipreads about 40%. So when a client requests an interpreter, they are legally entitled to it. I asked this client if an interpreter was necessary for her job interview and she got really pissed at me. I did this training and IMMEDIATELY emailed her an apology. All is well but I mean, I would never have known that had I not took this training.

For some deaf people, English is a second language. I never thought of it in this way.

Deaf people make facial expressions to show intonation. And some of their contortions are grammar markers! I HAD NO IDEA!

80 - 90% of blind people can register light! Most of them can actually see. There is only a really small percentage of people who are completely blind. As well, there can be tunnel vision and the opposite where the centre of the picture is blocked out.

A long white cane with a red end means someone is nearly or completely blind.

A short white cane means that the person can see. But he making people aware that he is partially blind. This person might not actually need this cane for support, only to signify to people of his/her disability. Hence, why these people don't take their short canes out at night. There's no point as no one is going to really see the cane.

1 in 5 people will have or develop a disability in the next 20 years. Anything from deafness to blindness to ADHD to epilepsy.

Hearing-impaired is now Hard of hearing.

Never touch someone's wheelchair, cane or working dog because these are considered personal property. It would be like touching your wallet, phone or clothing.

Seizure dogs are now in full force. For some reason, dogs can warn people around the owner that a seizure is about to happen. SO neat!

Blind people do not have special powers of hearing. They hear the same but some can read echoes therefore being able to sense where walls are.

Statistics show that violence is limited to people with a mental illness. Violence in the western world happens more often with people of the general population. In fact, stats show that violent incidents are lower with the mental illness population.

The term MUTE is outdated. Deaf people have normal vocal organs. Most don't choose to use them as they fear being misunderstood.
 

grumblegirl

TRIBE Member
also noteworthy -

just because you can't *see* what's wrong with someone, doesn't mean they are not disabled.

there are *many* people with invisible disabilities.
if someone asks for your seat at the front of the bus, and they *look* fine - that does not immediately mean that they are lazy.
 

bushka

TRIBE Member
Mofo, it's interesting that you posted this today. Just yesterday I had a deaf person come in to do pre-employment testing to get a job with our company. Previous to that I had communicated with her via Bell Rellay Service, where there was a live operator on the other end translating what we were saying to one another. Anyway, this may be a stupid question, but did you happen to find out if using the word "deaf" is appropriate these days? Or would you say "hearing impaired"? (Which I think would only apply to people who could still hear something...) Any idea?
 

kmac

TRIBE Member
Good thread. I have a tonne to contribute thanks to my volunteer work and personal life but no time to get into it so, in short, I will say it's not cool to pat a little person or dwarf on the head.
 
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janiecakes

TRIBE Member
bushka said:
Mofo, it's interesting that you posted this today. Just yesterday I had a deaf person come in to do pre-employment testing to get a job with our company. Previous to that I had communicated with her via Bell Rellay Service, where there was a live operator on the other end translating what we were saying to one another. Anyway, this may be a stupid question, but did you happen to find out if using the word "deaf" is appropriate these days? Or would you say "hearing impaired"? (Which I think would only apply to people who could still hear something...) Any idea?
you would not say 'hearing impaired'. here is some info on terminology:

http://www.cad.ca/english/about_cad/mk_terminology.htm
 

judge wopner

TRIBE Member
many people have disabilities that you may not see at first glance such as a prostehtic leg or even a well crafted prostetic hand. ive been hit with this realization before meeting people who give me their left hand to shake and after having looked at them funny realized they have a prosethic right hand and arent comfortable shaking people's hand with it.

if a person who appears to be a able bodied individual is sitting in a seat on a packed subway and does not give up their seat to say an elderly person,
think twice before barking at them, you dont know if they have a prostetic leg, a severe back injury that precludes them from prolonged standing.
 
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nikki.classics

TRIBE Member
judge wopner said:
many people have disabilities that you may not see at first glance such as a prostehtic leg or even a well crafted prostetic hand.
agreed. my roomate always wears long pants, and it was about a year before I found out he has a prostetic leg!
 

Kiera

TRIBE Member
There was a teacher at my old high school who had a prosthetic leg. When his class would get really rowdy and ignore him completely he used to take his leg off and slam it on his desk to get his students attention. Ahaha aaaah. Too bad I cant remember his name.
 

bushka

TRIBE Member
Kiera said:
There was a teacher at my old high school who had a prosthetic leg. When his class would get really rowdy and ignore him completely he used to take his leg off and slam it on his desk to get his students attention. Ahaha aaaah. Too bad I cant remember his name.
that's hilarious!
 
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wayne bradbury

TRIBE Member
Speaking of deaf people and interpreters. My immigration officer handling my case for migrating to Australia is deaf and during the interview process there is an interpreter. A little bit weird, but kindve cool. The relay service over the phone can be a bit annoying, but I think its cool deaf people are able to do these jobs with these tools available to them.
 

nikki.classics

TRIBE Member
Kiera said:
There was a teacher at my old high school who had a prosthetic leg. When his class would get really rowdy and ignore him completely he used to take his leg off and slam it on his desk to get his students attention. Ahaha aaaah. Too bad I cant remember his name.
haha that's wicked!
there was this guy in my highschool with a prosthetic foot and to freak people out he used to put it on backwards and run around.
 

Syntax Error

Well-Known TRIBEr
people with disabilities do not want to be treated differently than everyone else. except for old people because they're crabby and expect everyone to bow down to them.
 

MoFo

TRIBE Member
bushka said:
Mofo, it's interesting that you posted this today. Just yesterday I had a deaf person come in to do pre-employment testing to get a job with our company. Previous to that I had communicated with her via Bell Rellay Service, where there was a live operator on the other end translating what we were saying to one another. Anyway, this may be a stupid question, but did you happen to find out if using the word "deaf" is appropriate these days? Or would you say "hearing impaired"? (Which I think would only apply to people who could still hear something...) Any idea?
Deaf is fine.


Here is the rundown:

Deaf - severe hearing loss

Deafened or late deafened - develops a hearing loss

Hard of Hearing - Uses their residual hearing and speech to communicate. Can hear but might use aids or technical devices
 
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MoFo

TRIBE Member
janiecakes said:
who did the training sunny?
Epilepsy Toronto
Canadian Hearing Society
March of Dimes

And a few others who I can't recall off the top of my head.

It was at a conference at the Holiday Inn Airport.
 

MoFo

TRIBE Member
Syntax Error said:
people with disabilities do not want to be treated differently than everyone else. except for old people because they're crabby and expect everyone to bow down to them.
Ya but an old person can develop a disability like hearing loss and blindness.

So whatever. We should just use our judgment.
 

janiecakes

TRIBE Member
MoFo said:
Deaf is fine.


Here is the rundown:

Deaf - severe hearing loss

Deafened or late deafened - develops a hearing loss

Hard of Hearing - Uses their residual hearing and speech to communicate. Can hear but might use aids or technical devices
check the link i posted sunny - it has a little more info (eg. the difference between 'deaf' and 'Deaf').
 
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