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pasta question...

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defazman

TRIBE Member
Adding salt has the water boil at a higher temperature, thus taking longer to boil but less time to cook. More importantly, it adds flavour to the pasta. Adding olive oil makes it nice and slippery.
 

quantumize

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by judge wopner
by adding salt to the pasta water, does it speed up or slow down the boiling of the water...

just wondering...

you add salt at the end after the water is already boiling, or else it will make the water take longer to boil

[never add oil to the water just watch it and stir it]
 

Littlest Hobo

TRIBE Member
Adding anything to the water will cause the water to cool. But if you're asking whether the salt will make the water come to a rolling boil more slowly, I say no because you should only add the salt once the water is at the rolling boil. Then it makes a cool sound and bubbles n'stuff.
 
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defazman

TRIBE Member
http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01021.htm


Question - In a controlled situation, where the heat input is equal,
which will come to
a boil first.... two gallons or pure distilled water, or two gallons of
pure distilled water with approximately three tablespoons of salt thrown in
when the heat is turned on? As to whether the pots are open or closed, it
doesn't matter, as long as both are in the same condition. Finally, there is
no pasta in the water.
Almost all the chef's in the country believe that the water will boil SLOWER
if you put a handful of salt in the water. I believe it will boil FASTER.


Sorry to be a pest, but thanks. Feel free to ask me an veterinary question
if you have any.
-------------------------
Dr, Phil,

As soon as any of the salt dissolves in the water, the boiling point of
the water
will begin to rise -- by about one half degree Celsius for every 58 grams
of salt
dissolved per kilogram of water. In fact, any non-volatile soluble
substance will
raise the boiling point of water. That is why antifreeze (ethylene glycol)
provides boiling protection in winter as it simultaneously provides freezing
protection in the summer.

Referring to the specific situation you described: I will assume that the rather
small amount of salt added (relative to the much larger volume of water)will be
completely dissolved well before ebulliation commences. If so, the salted water
will require more exposure to the heat before boiling than would the distilled
water. So the salted water "boils slower" than the distilled water. Nevertheless,
under these real-world conditions of low salt concentration, it would be
difficult to tell which pot boiled first.

Consider this experiment -- just do not do it: Bring two pots of plain water to
near boiling and then toss salt in one of them. The pot receiving the salt will
likely explode into violent boiling because the salt crystals provided nucleation
sites that would allow the water to vaporize as the salt fell through the
superheated liquid. Same thing would happen is you used fine sand. Under those
conditions, the salted water wins. However, that is not (or should not be)
the way things are done.

Regards,
ProfHoff 298
=========================================================
Almost all the chef's in the country believe that the water will boil
SLOWER
if you put a handful of salt in the water. I believe it will boil FASTER.

Salt in the water should raise the boiling point of the solution somewhat,
meaning that it will need to reach a higher temperature before it begins to
boil. So the chefs are correct.

If undisturbed water is heated to above its boiling temperature
(superheated), adding salt will cause it to immediately boil over. This
phenomenon is easy to observe with liquids heated in a microwave oven.

Richard E. Barrans Jr., Ph.D.
Assistant Director
PG Research Foundation, Darien, Illinois
 

Zorro

TRIBE Member
actually adding a bit of oil to an already boiling pot of water will prevent it from boiling over. there by cooking your pasta faster because of the higher heat you can maintain.
 

defazman

TRIBE Member
Boiling points are a function of PRESSURE and MATERIAL
By adding salt you are changing the MATERIAL
It is no longer water, but now salted water
 
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labRat

TRIBE Member
you'll get a hotter pot of water with salt added. boiling liquid can only be as hot as it's boiling point.

and, yes. adding oil both helps from boiling over and sticky pasta.
 

quantumize

TRIBE Member
never put oil in the water when cooking pasta. the natural starch is great for making the sauce stick. especially when i go through the trouble of making pasta by hands

i am a cook so i do cook pasta quite often
 
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labRat

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by quantumize
never put oil in the water when cooking pasta. the natural starch is great for making the sauce stick. especially when i go through the trouble of making pasta by hands

i am a cook so i do cook pasta quite often
but when i want to have a clean pot afterwards, it makes for easy clean up.
 

quantumize

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by labRat
but when i want to have a clean pot afterwards, it makes for easy clean up.

no ptroblem just stir it repeatedly for the 1st few minutes after then it won't stick


[unless you are crowding the pot, which isn't good for the pasta anyways]
 
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