• Hi Guest: Welcome to TRIBE, the online home of TRIBE MAGAZINE. If you'd like to post here, or reply to existing posts on TRIBE, you first have to register. Join us!

Openoffice

Colm

TRIBE Member
So what's the story with Openoffice.org?

I just downloaded it.

So far I've only used Writer and everything seems normal...

Is mozilla's free software too good to be true?
 
Cannabis Seed Wedding Bands

seeker

TRIBE Member
that one's not mozilla, it's a port of Sun's StarOffice. and yes, it's very good, but not so good as to not be true.
 

deafplayer

TRIBE Member
wait wait wait wait wait............ this looks really good

is it really that good? It looks too good to be true

seeker do you mean its not that good, or its not untrue?
 

Hypnotoad

TRIBE Member
Colm said:
So what's the story with Openoffice.org?

I just downloaded it.

So far I've only used Writer and everything seems normal...

Is mozilla's free software too good to be true?

As mentioned earlier, Sun is the main sponsor of OpenOffice. Second, what is too good to be true? Do you expect a a pop-up window next week indicating you need to pay $150 to continue to use the software? It's an open source project, and there will never be a monetary price for it.
 
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders

ibiza911

TRIBE Member
Hypnotoad said:
As mentioned earlier, Sun is the main sponsor of OpenOffice. Second, what is too good to be true? Do you expect a a pop-up window next week indicating you need to pay $150 to continue to use the software? It's an open source project, and there will never be a monetary price for it.

Open source, free to use, I have it on the floor computers here at the plant rather then having M$ office which requires $$$. Open Office is gold!
 

seeker

TRIBE Member
deafplayer said:
seeker do you mean its not that good, or its not untrue?

i think this has been addressed, but Yes, it's really good. however, high-quality open source software is everywhere. is it really a surprise that you can get such good stuff for free? if it is, welcome to a whole new world ;)

gah, did i just quote a disney song?
 

Polymorph

TRIBE Member
ibiza911 said:
Open source, free to use, I have it on the floor computers here at the plant rather then having M$ office which requires $$$. Open Office is gold!


oooh. When you put it that way, it just sounds so....subversive....

The floor computers at the plant are holding it down with ooo!

Fuck you, M$!

(cool)
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
I fucking love how the developers even mimicked a lot of the crappy aesthetics and counter-intuitive interfaces that Microsoft put into their software. It's so insidious and intentional! I remember way back before it was even called "openoffice" and they were talking about going with a different layout but they *totally* want to creep under Microsoft's skin with this.



Response from Microsoft:


AND IT'S FREE, OMG WHAT ARE WE GONNA DOOOOOOOOOOO?????



KILL THEM ALL.
 
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders

Hypnotoad

TRIBE Member
Sleepy Giant said:
They lost $31 BILLION of market cap today.

Ya, I'm not sure the stockholders wants them to wage war against google, yahoo, et el. The game console war is eating enough resources, oi vey!
 

Colm

TRIBE Member
~atp~ said:
I fucking love how the developers even mimicked a lot of the crappy aesthetics and counter-intuitive interfaces that Microsoft put into their software. It's so insidious and intentional! I remember way back before it was even called "openoffice" and they were talking about going with a different layout but they *totally* want to creep under Microsoft's skin with this.

I loaded it onto all the computers at my work and so far so good. Personally, I like the shots at microsoft and that it's open source, those are very good things. But in a managerial sense, I also like how people at work can use it readily since its so similar to M$Office.

I've noticed a couple small issues in Writer, mainly graphical, and a few small things in Calc. Nothing major...

So what's the bleeding edge version?

I grabbed the version from openoffice.org... 2.2.1 I think.
 

Polymorph

TRIBE Member
*note* : if yer all pants-wetting over this open-source stuff, perhaps you should also check out "Blender" (open-source 3-D modelling suite), and "Gimp" (basically, a free Photoshop/Illustrator graphic artist thingie...)

From what I've read, Blender has a bit of a steep learning curve, but how many 3-D modelling suites don't? Gimp? Yeah I haven't done any homework on that yet really.

Thing is, I've got both installed here on my home mac, and I've yet to even touch them. Still way too obsessed with PS/abobe stuff and Live....

Still, free shit. And Blender really does appear to be the 3-D sister software of OOo.... in that, there's a whole community of brainiac net-geeks obsessed with inputting to and upgrading this thing...


............point being, perhaps you should just kickstart an Open-Source thread...
 

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
I've been using it for a little over 6 months now. I do have a few minor gripes. First it takes forever and a day to actually open a document compared to MS Office. Second its got one ugly ass memory foot print and has a tendancy to not free resources on exit, the more documents you have open the worse the leek appears to get.

overall not bad and I'm suggesting it to others but its still not ready for prime time. If they were charging the same as MS Office for the package I wouldn't even consider it, if they were charging half as much I would likely still just pirate a copy of MS Office however being that its free I use it rather than pirate a copy of office and thats the only reason.
 

TheRunningBoard

TRIBE Member
Ditto Much said:
I've been using it for a little over 6 months now. I do have a few minor gripes. First it takes forever and a day to actually open a document compared to MS Office. Second its got one ugly ass memory foot print and has a tendancy to not free resources on exit, the more documents you have open the worse the leek appears to get.

overall not bad and I'm suggesting it to others but its still not ready for prime time. If they were charging the same as MS Office for the package I wouldn't even consider it, if they were charging half as much I would likely still just pirate a copy of MS Office however being that its free I use it rather than pirate a copy of office and thats the only reason.

Hmm...I guess I have had a different experience. Since 2.0 the speed of opening of documents is a non issue. Opening 70 + page docs in MS Word is really slow, as they load the first 10 pages right away to make it seem snappy..but if you want to edit down in the document, it is slow.

I use Open Office for a ton of stuff including editing MS Word docs with custom numbering etc. and I like it quite a bit.

The Gimp is also very nice (though I am not a pro photo editor by any means).
 
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders

miscreant

TRIBE Member
OO has my vote, I find that any x app runs better in the native nix enviroment. OO takes forever to load in OSX.

Another gem for the open source community is synfig
 

deafplayer

TRIBE Member
greetings fellow openoffice users and other g33k and Computer Stuff people. I have a question for you..... its really small, but its getting irritating:

when using Times New Roman (and what else would you use anyway?), and Georgia, for that matter, single quotation marks (or, if you will, "apostraphes") ( ' ) are just a straight line, whereas double marks ( " ) have that nice curved, angled, cursive thing going on

I would like to know how to make the single marks curvy like the double ones (single marks are curvy by default in M$ Word)

if I copy and paste text including curvy single marks from M$ Office into the doc, they are reproduced fine (and appear as the same font), but I cannot type them

here is some interesting background info from Wikipedia to entertain you, which you will probably understand a lot better than I:

Glyphs

A list of glyphs used as quotation marks and their Unicode (and HTML) values and names follows. The Unicode standard defines two general character categories, “Ps” (punctuation quote start) and “Pe” (punctuation quote end), for all quotation mark characters. (Warning: Some of these glyphs may not display properly in older browsers, which may substitute other sorts or a square.)
[edit]

Typewriter quotation marks

“Ambidextrous” quotation marks were introduced on typewriters to reduce the number of keys on the keyboard, and were inherited by computer keyboards and character sets. However, modern word processors have started to convert text to use curved quotes (see below). Some computer systems designed in the past had proper opening and closing quotes, with a few machines even making a distinction between regular apostrophes (e.g. couldn’t) and apostrophes that show possession (e.g. Dave’s car). However, the ASCII character set, which has been used on a wide variety of computers since the 1960s, only made three quotation marks available: ", ', and the dubious backquote ` (also referred to as a backtick and a letterless grave accent). The Unicode standard includes typographic and a variety of international quotation marks.

[...]
Many systems, like the personal computers of the 1980s and early ’90s, actually drew straight quotes like curved closing quotes on-screen and in printouts, [...]

The grave accent (`, U+0060) could then be used to supply single quote marks. The typesetting application TeX still uses this convention for input files. This use resulted in fonts with an open quote glyph at the grave accent position. This gives a proper appearance at the cost of semantic correctness. Nothing similar was available for the double-quote, so many people resorted to using sets of two single quotes for punctuation, [...]

However, the appearance of these characters has varied greatly from font to font. On systems which provide straight quotes and grave accents the appearance is poor. Unicode specifies that the glyphs for U+0027 and U+0022 should be vertical rather than angled, which means if such tricks are used with a font that follows the rules, like most do today, the result will look rather messy. Of course Unicode also provides the ability to do angled quotes properly:

“Good morning, Dave,” said HAL.‘Good morning, Dave,’ said HAL. [edit]


Quotation marks in English

English curved quotes, also called “book quotes” or “curly quotes”, look like small figures six and nine with the counters filled. They are preferred in formal writing and printed typography. In e-mail and on Usenet they can only be used by using a MIME type with a character set outside of the ISO-8859 series such as a Unicode encoding or one of the Windows-125x series. While not a problem for most modern mail clients this does increase the size of the message and makes the raw message text harder to follow and so some believe it is bad practice (in much the same way that some think that HTML e-mail is a bad thing). A few mail clients send curved quotes using the windows-1252 codes but mark the text as ISO-8859-1 causing problems for decoders that do not make the dubious assumption that C1 control codes in ISO-8859-1 text were meant to be windows-1252 printable characters.

Curved and straight quotes are also sometimes referred to as “smart quotes” and "dumb quotes" respectively; these names are in reference to the name of a function found in word processors like Microsoft Word that automatically converts straight quotes typed by the user into curved quotes. This function is necessary because keyboards lack separate quotation marks, due to the fact the ASCII character set did not have distinct opening and closing quotation marks. A quote followed by a letter generally becomes an opening quote, whereas a quote with a letter or period (full stop) preceding it and a space after it becomes a closing quote. This function is usually referred to as "educating quotes".

[...]
Variants of and are:

– U+201B (HTML: ‛) – single high-reversed-9, or single reversed comma, quotation mark (This is sometimes used to show dropped sounds at the end of words, such as goin‛ instead of using goin‘, goin’, goin`, or goin')

– U+201F (HTML: ‟) – double high-reversed-9, or double reversed comma, quotation mark Supporting curved quotes has been a problem in information technology, primarily because the widely-used ASCII character set did not include a representation for them (as discussed above).

Word processors have traditionally offered curved quotes to users, because in printed documents curved quotes are preferred to straight ones. Before Unicode was widely accepted and supported, this meant representing the curved quotes in whatever 8-bit encoding the software and underlying operating system were using — but the character sets for Windows and Macintosh used two different pairs of values for curved quotes, and ISO 8859-1 (typically the default character set for the Unices and Linux) had no curved quotes, making cross-platform compatibility a nightmare.

Compounding the problem is the “smart quotes” feature mentioned above, which some word processors (including Microsoft Word and OpenOffice.org) use by default. With this feature turned on, users may not have realised that the ASCII-compatible straight quotes they were typing on their keyboards ended up as something entirely different.

Unicode support has since become the norm for operating systems. Thus, in at least some cases, transferring content containing curved quotes (or any other non-ASCII characters) from a word processor to another application or platform has sometimes been less troublesome, provided all steps in the process (including the clipboard if applicable) are Unicode-aware. But there are many applications which still use the older character sets, or output data using them, and thus problems still occur.

There are other considerations for including curved quotes in the widely used markup languages HTML, XML, and SGML. If the encoding of the document supports direct representation of the characters, they can be used, but doing so can result in difficulties if the document needs to be edited by someone who is using an editor that cannot support the encoding. For example, many simple text editors only handle a few encodings or assume that the encoding of any file opened is a platform default, so the quote characters may appear as "garbage". HTML includes a set of entities for curved quotes ‘ (left single), ’ (right single), ‚ (low 9 single), “ (left double) ” (right double) &dbquo; (low 9 double). XML does not define these by default, but specifications based on it can do so, and XHTML does. In addition, while the HTML 4, XHTML and XML specifications allow specifying numeric character references in either hexadecimal or decimal, SGML and older versions of HTML (and many old implementations) only support decimal references. Thus, to represent curly quotes in XML and SGML, it is safest to use the decimal numeric character references. That is, to represent the double curly quotes use “ and ”, and to represent single curly quotes use ‘ and ’. In HTML, it is safest to use the named entity references (“, etc.), although decimal numeric character references can be processed by most web browsers (Netscape 4 being a notable exception).

There has been some argument in recent years about the appropriateness of book quotes, since they are perceived by some as distracting. Editors who are against book quotes generally argue for ASCII-style straight quotes.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quotation_mark#Glyphs
 

deafplayer

TRIBE Member
Okay I got it to work :)

in case anyone else is interested:


Tools > AutoCorrect...

There is a tab called "Custom Quotes". There you can choose to automatically replace "Single quotes", both the "Start quote" and "End quote", with characters of your choosing, selected from the big character map

same thing for "Double quotes"
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
Ditto Much said:
I've been using it for a little over 6 months now. I do have a few minor gripes. First it takes forever and a day to actually open a document compared to MS Office. Second its got one ugly ass memory foot print and has a tendancy to not free resources on exit, the more documents you have open the worse the leek appears to get.

overall not bad and I'm suggesting it to others but its still not ready for prime time. If they were charging the same as MS Office for the package I wouldn't even consider it, if they were charging half as much I would likely still just pirate a copy of MS Office however being that its free I use it rather than pirate a copy of office and thats the only reason.

Yeah, the reason for those failures are not necessarily due to poor design. For example, as you probably know, the format for OO documents is a compressed XML file.

A standardized and extensible XML definition for documents makes a lot of sense, as it encourages cross-compatibility between applications and across versions. Microsoft has yet to adopt this practice (though they are playing the catch-up game on this front).
 
Top