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open fiberglass insolation?? bad good what?

swilly

TRIBE Member
we have some open fibre glass insolation right next to the our work out area in the basment. There is a fair bit of it as well in both the brown yellow and pink types

as my stupid landlord will not allow me to put my chinup bar anywhere else i am forced to work out next to what i think is a harmfull substance.

Is this correct?

swilly
 

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by swilly
we have some open fibre glass insolation right next to the our work out area in the basment. There is a fair bit of it as well in both the brown yellow and pink types

as my stupid landlord will not allow me to put my chinup bar anywhere else i am forced to work out next to what i think is a harmfull substance.

Is this correct?

swilly
Its not great, I would grab some cheap vapour barrier and covering it. Nothing should make it go airborne and cause you any harm, but its a dust magnet and I wouldn't want to agitate it to much.

Seriously though 10 bucks in plastic and a staple gun. If your downtown you can borrow my electric one…
 

KiFe

TRIBE Member
You should be able to find some plastic 'thermal wrap' from crappy tire...

tack it to the studs to cover up the insulation.

your landlord should be appreceative for the extra insulation, and the fact that you are conforming to his desires.

if he gives you greif, it's time to move out :)
 
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squirrely

TRIBE Member
i can't count the number of times that i have been unable to control my desire to touch that stuff.

ow.

prickly.

:(
 

gubydal

TRIBE Member
Copies of this publication are available from the Department of Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare, Western Australia.

DOCUMENT
Fibreglass is a man-made product with many uses like heat and acoustic
insulation, fire blankets and reinforcement of plastics and mouldings. But
with those uses come potential hazards.
The Occupational Health Safety and Welfare Act says employers must provide
education, training, safe work systems and protection against such hazards.
Employees have an equal duty to protect themselves and others from hazards.
Why is fibreglass hazardous?
Fibreglass is formed into a fine filament or fibre when molten glass is forced
through small holes. These fibres can cause irritation, but the biggest
hazard is from the epoxies or resins used to bind sheets of fibreglass
together or to other materials. They can cause irritation to the eyes. nose,
throat and skin.
How fine are the fibres?
Typically they are between 5 and 15 microns (thousandths of a millimetre) in
diameter. Only fibres less than 3 microns in diameter are small enough to
pass into the lungs. Dust and airborne fibres can be released when fibreglass
reinforced plastics are cut, ground or sanded.
What happens if I breathe the dust or fibres?
Most of the fibres will be trapped by the body's nose and throat defence
mechanisms but a very small amount of dust may pass into the lungs. Body
fluids will dissolve this small amount (unlike asbestos) and remove it.
What if the fibres break and become smaller?
When fibreglass breaks it does so across the fibre, not along it, forming
short thick fibres as opposed to finer ones, as asbestos does. In over 40
years, users of fibreglass have not shown lung abnormalities any different
from the rest of the population .
What happens if I get it on my skin?
Fibreglass dust will cause irritation when rubbed on the skin of most people,
particularly in the folds of skin around the wrists, collars and waistbands.
Perspiration aggravates the situation.
Most people quickly become desensitized, hence the irritation is usually
temporary. Showering to remove the fibres will provide relief.
Fibreglass insulation in a building will cause no discomfort to occupants once
installed.
Solvents, such as Acetone and Ethyl Acetate, are often used to clean resin
from equipment. They should not be used to clean resin from the skin because
they can cause drying of the skin or dermatitis. They can also be absorbed
through the skin and could cause adverse long-term effects on the body.
How should I handle fibreglass insulation?
Employers should provide safe work systems to minimize hazards. However,
because of the sometimes cramped locations during installation of fibreglass
'matting', dust levels may sometime be higher. Here it is recommended a class
L or M dust mask be worn; the disposable type is ideal. Cotton overalls
should be worn to avoid skin irritation, and these should be washed regularly.
Suitable gloves, with overall cuffs worn over them, will prevent hand
irritation.
Source
 
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