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OOOOOooohhh boy...the aftermath is not going to be good...

deevah

TRIBE Member
"http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20060222.wiraq0222/BNStory/International/"

Explosion destroys golden dome of Iraqi shrine
ZIAD KHALAF

Associated Press

Sammara, Iraq — A large explosion destroyed the golden dome of one of Iraq's most famous Shiite shrines Wednesday, sending protesters pouring into the streets. The third major attack against Shiites in as many days threatened to enflame sectarian passions at a time when talks on a coalition government have bogged down.

Shiite leaders called for calm, but scattered attacks occurred against Sunni mosques in Baghdad. U.S. and Iraqi forces deployed around major Sunni mosques, and 500 Iraqi soldiers were sent to Sunni neighborhoods in the capital to prevent clashes between Shiites and Sunnis, army Capt. Jassim al-Wahash said.

No group claimed responsibility for the early morning attack on the Askariya shrine in this city 60 miles north of Baghdad, but suspicion fell on Sunni extremist groups such as al-Qaeda in Iraq led by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi.

The Interior Ministry said four men, one wearing a military uniform and three in black, entered the mosque early Wednesday and detonated two bombs, one of which collapsed the dome and damaging part of the northern wall of the shrine.

Police believed an unknown number of people may have been buried under the debris after the 6:55 a.m. explosion at the Askariya mosque. The shrine contains the tombs of two revered Shiite imams, both descendants of the Prophet Muhammad.

In Baghdad, National Security Adviser Mouwafak al-Rubaie blamed religious zealots such as the al-Qaeda terror network, telling Al-Arabiya television that the attack was an attempt "to pull Iraq toward civil war."

The country's most revered Shiite cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, sent instructions to his followers forbidding attacks on Sunni mosques, especially the major ones in Baghdad. He called for seven days of mourning, his aides said.

The Sunni Endowment, a government organization that cares for Sunni mosques and shrines, condemned the blast and said it was sending a delegation to Samarra to investigate.

In the capital, security was heightened around Sunni mosques, but gunmen sprayed one with automatic weapons fire, killing a street vendor, police said.

Gunmen also fired rocket propelled grenades at two Sunni mosques in the capital, police said.

U.S. and Iraqi forces sealed off all streets leading to the main Sunni mosque in Baghdad, Abu Hanifa, in the mostly Sunni Azamiyah neighborhood.

Following the blast, U.S. and Iraqi forces in Samarra surrounded the shrine and searched houses in the area. Five police officers responsible for protecting the mosque were taken into custody, said Col. Bashar Abdullah, chief of police commandoes.

Large protests erupted in Shiite parts of Baghdad and in cities throughout the Shiite heartland to the south.

Residents of Najaf closed their shops and gathered in the city's 1920 Revolution Square for a demonstration. In Baghdad's Sadr City, thousands of Shiites, some brandishing Kalashnikov rifles, marched through the streets shouting anti-American slogans.

All mosques in the Shiite city of Diwaniyah, 80 miles south of Baghdad began broadcasting "Allahu akbar," or "God is Great" from loudspeakers and urged people to turn out in the streets. All markets, shops and stores closed, police Maj. Muhammad Ali said.

In Samarra, demonstrators gathered near the shrine, waving Iraqi flags, Shiite religious banners and copies of the Muslim holy book, Quran.

"This criminal act aims at igniting civil strife," said Mahmoud al-Samarie, a 28-year-old builder who was among the crowd in Samarra. "We demand an investigation so that the criminals who did this be punished. If the government fails to do so, then we will take up arms and chase the people behind this attack."

Religious leaders at other mosques and shrines throughout the city denounced the attack in statements read over loudspeakers.

President Jalal Talabani condemned the attack and called for restraint, saying the attack was designed to sabotage talks on a government of national unity following the Dec. 15 parliamentary election.

Prime Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari urged all Iraqis to condemn the attack and urged both Muslim and Christian leaders abroad "to redouble their efforts to help the Iraqi government stop these saboteurs."

The shrine attack followed a devastating car bomb late Tuesday in a Shiite corner of Baghdad, killing 22 people, according to police. The day before, 12 died in a suicide attack on a bus in the capital's heavily Shiite district of Kazimiyah.

Tradition says the Askariya shrine, which draws Shiite pilgrims from throughout the Islamic world, is near the place where the last of the 12 Shiite imams, Mohammed al-Mahdi, disappeared. Al-Mahdi, known as the "hidden imam," was the son and grandson of the two imams buried in the Askariya shrine.

Shiites believe he is still alive and will return to restore justice to humanity. An attack at such an important religious shrine would constitute a grave assault on Shiite Islam at a time of rising sectarian tensions in Iraq. The shrine contains the tombs of the 10th and 11th imams, Ali al-Hadi, who died in 868 A.D., and his son Hassan al-Askari, who died in 874 A.D. and was the father of the hidden imam.

The golden dome was completed in 1905.

In other violence Wednesday, a judge was seriously injured and four of his bodyguards killed when unidentified gunmen fired at his car on the outskirts of Muqdadiyah, a town about 60 miles north of Baghdad, police said.

In Baqouba, about 35 miles northeast of Baghdad, two police officers were killed in a drive-by shooting Wednesday morning.

A roadside bomb exploded near a primary school in a mostly Shiite area near Kut, 100 miles southeast of Baghdad, killing two boys and injuring four others, police said.




*shakes head*

get all the foreign military out of there, this place is gonna blow
 

atbell

TRIBE Member
Makes me glad I stoped building monuments so long ago.

It has really made my life a lot easier in the long run.

Although, that one snow fort was something to be proud of back in the day...

:p
 

Lurker

TRIBE Member
So whodunnit?

Iran? Sunni Iraqis? Americans? Brits? Sunni Iraqis paid by Americans?

The Russians?

I'm going with the long odds on the Russians :)

Putin is a bad-ass and this is fine retribution for the US defeating their little proxy wars and Afghanistan back in the day. He's a ruthless mouthafucker too and would pull a stunt like this.

This was a message attack, not a suicide bombing. The guys who did this actually REMOVED people from the place before they planted explosives and lit it off. Any other terrorist would likely dropp by there during Friday afternoon prayer and blow themselves and everyone else up too.

Just my guess.

It's fucking cold whoever is behind it.
 

atbell

TRIBE Member
^^^^^^

you've got a good conspiracy in the works there!

I have heard a lot about our northern friends and not much of it is pretty.

Here are some choice quotes from the Jan/Feb 06 issue of Foreign Affairs:
"Western cheerleaders of Russian President Vladimir Putin are likely to dismiss positive Russian attitudes towards Stalin as a minor growing pain or a speed bump on the country's road to democracy - just as they downplay the carnage in Chechnya; the festering, potentially explosive conflict throughout the North Caucasus; the Kremlin's blatant suppression of independent television outlets and nongovernmental organizations that dare to challenge its official line; the sorry state of Russia's disintegrating military; the predatory and ineffective police; and the massive corruption at all levels of Russian government."

"About half (51 %) of the respondents [to a survey conducted by FA] agreed that Stalin was a wise leader. ... Over half (56 %) said they thought he did more good than bad. ... Opinions were about equally divided over whether Stalin was a cruel tyrant (43 % agreed and 47% disagreed) - a strange finding given that 70% of the respondents agreed that Stalin imprisoned, tortured and killed millions of innocent people."
[as a note, the information about how this survey was done was not documented well]

So I think that the country is ready for some good old cold waring. This single attack is going to cost the US billions as they struggle with added months and years of full military involvement. It would have been a well played move by an opponent, Russian or other.
 

junglisthead

TRIBE Member
if anyone did it, it would be british SAS agents, as they control the area
it would make perfect sense as it not only causes a civil war, but also can be seen as a parting shot against IRAN

how ? iran are shias, and this was a sacred shia temple
 

Lurker

TRIBE Member
junglisthead said:
if anyone did it, it would be british SAS agents, as they control the area
it would make perfect sense as it not only causes a civil war, but also can be seen as a parting shot against IRAN

how ? iran are shias, and this was a sacred shia temple
Agreed. But would the Brits be that ruthless to blow up the 3rd holiest site in the Shia faith? I'm not so sure I think so. I would figure the Americans would do it before the SAS. The Americans also need an "out" more than the Brits too...

This civil war kinda creates that out
 

docta seuss

TRIBE Member
junglisthead said:
if anyone did it, it would be british SAS agents, as they control the area
it would make perfect sense as it not only causes a civil war, but also can be seen as a parting shot against IRAN

how ? iran are shias, and this was a sacred shia temple
??

how exactly would this be beneficial to Britain?
 

junglisthead

TRIBE Member
not benefit britian,but the coalition, as britian is part of it

and they are experts at pseudo ops, as they have done such with the IRA for many years
 

Lurker

TRIBE Member
junglisthead said:
not benefit britian,but the coalition, as britian is part of it

and they are experts at pseudo ops, as they have done such with the IRA for many years
Don't think that just the UK has the guys talented enough to have pulled this off. I love the SAS, but they've always been one for a hearts and minds campaign and I think that knowingly blowing up a shrine would honestly go to far. They're not that barbaric.

There's any number of commando's that could've done this. Hell, it could've even been Iran!

I don't think a western country is responsible. It's going a bit too far.

My money is still on Russia.
 

junglisthead

TRIBE Member
sas have already done sneaky tactics in iraq, as late last years a few agents were caught dressed as "terrorists" shooting up iraqi police

and SAS are famous for pulling these stunts and directing blame on IRA

Iran would not have done it, as it is a very sacred site to shiites, and Iran is a dominate Shiite state, it holds to close to their beliefs and that is why i truly believe this was a shot from coalition forces towards IRAN. Trying to provoke them into retaliating and thereofre, having an excuse to go to war with Iran
 

Lurker

TRIBE Member
junglisthead said:
sas have already done sneaky tactics in iraq, as late last years a few agents were caught dressed as "terrorists" shooting up iraqi police

and SAS are famous for pulling these stunts and directing blame on IRA

Iran would not have done it, as it is a very sacred site to shiites, and Iran is a dominate Shiite state, it holds to close to their beliefs and that is why i truly believe this was a shot from coalition forces towards IRAN. Trying to provoke them into retaliating and thereofre, having an excuse to go to war with Iran
I somewhat agree. I would say that the US blew up the shrine for those same reasons before the Brits though, but that's just my personal guess.

We'll likely never know.
 

junglisthead

TRIBE Member
so al qa'ida claims responsibility for an unsuccessful attempt( oil refinery in saudi arabia on friday) and yet still havent claimed responsibilty for the hadi temple attack in which can be deemed as a successful attack ?

ok ?
 

Colm

TRIBE Member
There's some discussion over how quickly Syria & Iran repsonded to the attacks, and whether either government had prior knowledge of the bombing.

One theory is that the attack occurred to destablize an already uneasy peace between Sunni & Shia Muslims in Iraq. The last thing Iran wants is a working, Western style democracy in Iraq. Freedon of press & conscience does not mix with the Iranian theocracy.

Another theory concerns Western involvement. This holds that the attack was done to instigate a civil war to further destablize the entire Middle Eastern region. Middle Easterns fighting each other, rather than foreign powers & subway commuters, could be a good thing.
 
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