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Occam's Razor Proves 9/11 is a Conspiracy

solgrabber

TRIBE Member
If you ever try to argue with someone that 9/11 was an inside job, you'll probably get the phrase "Occam's razor" thrown back at you to explain away the evidence you present. Occam's razor is the logical principal that states that one should not make more assumptions than the minimum needed, or when it's put in its "simplest" terms: the simplest explanation is the best one.


For example:

Conspiracy question: "Why did our military stand down and why were all those war games going on the day of the attacks?"

Occam's razor answer: "The military wasn't ordered to stand down, they were just caught off guard and the military practices all the time, so having a war game going on shouldn't be too surprising."

CQ: "Why were all of the four planes only about 25% full of capacity?"

OR: "The hijackers choose flights with the fewest passengers, so they would be easier for them to control."

CQ: "How did the towers completely collapse to the ground at free-fall speed when the fires weren't even hot enough to melt the steel?"

OR: "The planes crashing into them caused structural damage and the jet fuel fires didn't have to melt the steel, but only needed to weaken them which caused the trusses to give and the weight of the top section caused each floor to pancake down on each other at a high rate of speed."

CQ: "How was Hani Hanjour able to fly a Boeing 757 like an experienced jet fighter pilot into the Pentagon when his flight instructors said his flying skills sucked?"

OR: "Crashing a plane is not very hard to do. Taking off and landing a plane is the hard part and none of the hijackers were training to do that."

CQ: "Why is there no plane at the Pentagon, but all the passenger's remains were supposedly recovered there?"

OR: "The plane virtually disintegrated upon impact, but there were few parts that survived which are seen in photos and the passengers were identified by their DNA which only small amounts are needed to do so."


Notice how each question seems easily answered by using the principal of Occam's razor. People who use this principal are at an advantage because:

1. Some events, such as 9/11, have a lot of evidence surrounding it, so usually you will only be able to present one or two pieces of evidence at a time which makes it easier for someone using Occam's razor to debate against instead of having to explain all the evidence away.

2. Some evidence can be complicated, so Occam's razor can be an easy way out of trying to explain away something that is complicated.

3. The official 9/11 story itself is very simple (19 Arabs with box cutters hijacked four planes and crashed them into our buildings because they hate our freedoms.), so that fits with Occam's razor perfectly.


Now notice how Occam's razor is basically explaining things as being a coincidence too. Yes coincidences do happen and the bigger the event, the more likely you will find more coincidences. However, each time you add on another coincidence, the odds get greater and greater that they can all still be just a coincidence (unless you think like a coincidence theorist). And remember, the flip-side of a coincidence is a conspiracy:

Coincidence - A sequence of events that although accidental seems to have been planned or arranged.

Conspiracy - An agreement to perform together an illegal, wrongful, or subversive act.


Well 9/11 doesn't just have a few coincidences surrounding it, it has TONS of coincidences surrounding it. So far I've found over 200 coincidences surrounding 9/11 with the help of a lot of great websites out there and some coincidences by themselves seem too coincidental to believe they're just a coincidence.

So how can one explain how an event, such as 9/11, can have so many coincidences surrounding it?

"Simple" (and ironically): Occam's razor.

The simplest explanation for there being so many coincidences surrounding 9/11 is that it was a conspiracy!

Case solved.

Source

http://killtown.blogspot.com/2006/05/occams-razor-proves-911-is-conspiracy.html
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
solgrabber, no offense but this is by far the largest abuse of rationalism I have seen from you yet.
 

solgrabber

TRIBE Member
solgrabber, no offense but this is by far the largest abuse of rationalism I have seen from you yet.
Is it? I merely threw it up to show that their are people who use Occam's Razor as a cop out when they are presented by actual facts and evidence, both of which are extremely prominent in the case of 9/11.
 
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~atp~

TRIBE Member
I agree that most people do not understand and therefore abuse Occam's razor, which is merely a layman's term for understanding reductionism, in the context of minimizing predicates or assumptions when trying to construct a theory that predicts or otherwise explains a given phenomenon.

However, this sort of insight is hardly worthy of an entire thread, nor do I think it is worthy to be framed as an observation relating to 9/11.
 

Deep_Groove

TRIBE Member
the power of coincidence

http://www.davidmyers.org/Brix?pageID=91

The Power of Coincidence

David G. Myers
E-SKEPTIC FOR SEPTEMBER 23, 2002 (Also appeared in Skeptic magazine)

People around me have been both amused and aghast at the news that on 9-11 the New York State Lottery's evening number game popped up the numbers 9-1-1. Is this a paranormal happening? A wink from God? Is there a message here?

It's hardly the first improbable lottery event. "We print winning numbers in advance!" headlined Oregon's Columbian on July 3, 2000. State lottery officials were incredulous when the newspaper announced their 6-8-5-5 winning Pick 4 numbers for June 28 in advance. Actually, the Columbian's computers had crashed. In the scramble to re-create a news page, a copyeditor accidently included Virginia's Pick 4 numbers, which were the exact numbers that Oregon was about to draw.

We've all marveled at such coincidences in our own lives. Checking out a photocopy counter from the Hope College library desk, I confused the clerk when giving my six-digit department charge number—which just happened at that moment to be identical to the counter's six-digit number on which the last user had finished. Shortly after my daughter, Laura Myers, bought two pairs of shoes, we were astounded to discover that the two brand names on the boxes were "Laura" and "Myers."

And then there are those remarkable coincidences that, with added digging, have been embellished into really fun stories, such as the familiar Lincoln-Kennedy coincidences (both with seven letters in their last names, elected 100 years apart, assassinated on a Friday while beside their wives, one in Ford's theater, the other in a Ford Motor Co. car, and so forth). We also have enjoyed newspaper accounts of astonishing happenings, such as when twins Lorraine and Levinia Christmas, driving to deliver Christmas presents to each other near Flitcham, England, collided.

My favorite is this little known fact: In Psalm 46 of the King James Bible, published in the year that Shakespeare turned 46, the 46th word is "shake" and the 46th word from the end is "spear." (More remarkable than this coincidence is that someone should have noted this!)

What shall we make of these weird coincidences? Was James Redfield right to suppose, in The Celestine Prophecy, that we should attend closely to "strange occurrences that feel like they were meant to happen"? Is he right to suppose that "They are actually synchronistic events, and following them will start you on your path to spiritual truth"? Without wanting to rob us of our delight in these serendipities, much less of our spirituality, statisticians assure us that the coincidences tell us nothing of spiritual significance.

"In reality," says mathematician John Allen Paulos, "the most astonishingly incredible coincidence imaginable would be the complete absence of all coincidences." When Evelyn Marie Adams won the New Jersey lottery twice, newspapers reported the odds of her feat as 1 in 17 trillion-the odds that a given person buying a single ticket for two New Jersey lotteries would win both. But statisticians Stephen Samuels and George McCabe report that, given the millions of people who buy U.S. state lottery tickets, it was "practically a sure thing" that someday, somewhere, someone would hit a state jackpot twice. Consider: An event that happens to but one in a billion people in a day happens 2000 times a year. A day when nothing weird happened would actually be the weirdest day of all.

Our intuition, as I explain in Intuition: Its Powers and Perils, fails to appreciate the streaky nature of random data. Batting slumps, hot hand shooters, and stock market patterns may behave like streak-prone random data, but our pattern-seeking minds demand explanations. Yet even the random digits of pi, which form what many mathematicians believe is a true random sequence, have some odd streaks that likely include your birth date. Mine, 9-20-42, appears beginning at the 131,564th decimal place. (To find yours, visit www.angio.net/pi/piquery).

The moral: That a particular specified event or coincidence will occur is very unlikely. That some astonishing unspecified events will occur is certain. That is why remarkable coincidences are noted in hindsight, not predicted with foresight. And that is why even those of us who believe in God don't need God's special intervention, or psychic powers, to expect, yet also delight in, improbable happenings.

Adapted from Intuition: Its Powers and Perils by David G. Myers, Yale University Press, 2002.
 

SellyCat

TRIBE Member
~atp~ said:
I agree that most people do not understand and therefore abuse Occam's razor, which is merely a layman's term for understanding reductionism, in the context of minimizing predicates or assumptions when trying to construct a theory that predicts or otherwise explains a given phenomenon.

However, this sort of insight is hardly worthy of an entire thread, nor do I think it is worthy to be framed as an observation relating to 9/11.
But have you ever thought about the connectiong to WMDs? I bet that razor would be WICKED for lining up rails of....ANTHRAX!
 

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
Deep Groove and solgrabber in the same thread... this has to be a milestone of the politics forum.
 

defazman

TRIBE Member
I find that most people who use the occam's razor argument are losers who saw Captain Picard use it on ST:TNG.
 
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why not

TRIBE Member
Deep_Groove said:
An event that happens to but one in a billion people in a day happens 2000 times a year. A day when nothing weird happened would actually be the weirdest day of all.
for some strange reason, i take great pleasure when Deep_Groove posts something i can actually agree with.
 
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