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New Renewable Energy Project

SuperKennyK

TRIBE Member
Wind project planned in lake
Trillium seeking site off Belleville
140 giant turbines worth $1 billion
May 31, 2006. 07:27 AM
TYLER HAMILTON
BUSINESS REPORTER


A Toronto company wants to ERECT more than 140 massive wind turbines down the middle of Lake Ontario in what would become the largest wind farm in North America.

Trillium Power Energy Corp. told the Toronto Star that it is in the process of getting government approvals for a 710-megawatt project, called Trillium Power Wind 1, which at full output would provide enough clean electricity to power more than 200,000 homes.

John Kourtoff, president and chief executive officer of Trillium, said the five-megawatt turbines would be in waters no deeper than 21 metres about 15 kilometres offshore from Prince Edward County, just south of Belleville.

"If you look out on the horizon, you'll barely see anything on the clearest day," said Kourtoff, adding the project would cost more than $1 billion. "We already have the financial backers."

By going offshore, the company plans to take advantage of better wind conditions, based on 36 years of wind data.

Kourtoff said the turbine bases would help support aquatic life, since fish and other water species tend to cluster and find sanctuary around underwater objects. The shallow waters also mean there is no danger of large ships hitting the structures.

Studies done so far indicate that the turbines would not conflict with the flight paths of birds. "There are no flyways, no aviary issues," Kourtoff said.

Power from the turbines would be sent back to shore through an underwater cable to Ontario Power Generation's Lennox oil-and-gas generating station near Kingston.

The Lennox plant has 230-kilovolt and 500-kilovolt transmission lines with enough surplus capacity to handle the additional power, so no new transmission infrastructure would be needed, Kourtoff said.

The project would dwarf the largest onshore projects already underway in Ontario. For example, the two phases of the $126 million Melancthon wind farm project near Shelbourne will total about 200 megawatts when complete.

The Erie Shores Wind Farm, west of Port Rowan, and the Prince Wind Farm, near Sault Ste. Marie, will each produce 100 megawatts. Epcor Utilities Inc.'s Kingsbridge project near Goderich will generate 40 megawatts, and another 50 megawatts will come from the Blue Highlands Wind Farm in the Blue Mountains.

"We would hope that our project assists Ontario in meeting its 2,700 megawatt target by 2010," said Kourtoff.

Only 122 megawatts of wind-generated power exists in the province today, but the Ontario Power Authority has signed contracts for 1,300 megawatts.

Robert Hornung, president of the Canadian Wind Energy Association, said Canada is just scratching the surface of its wind-energy potential, even though wind is expected to account for nearly 20 per cent of new electricity generation between now and 2015.

By 2015, Canada is expected to have 9,000 megawatts of installed wind generation, which would be about 3 per cent of the country's total capacity. "Canada's starting pretty far behind a lot of other countries, and even with the type of growth that I'm talking about, Canada will move maybe to the middle of the pack," Hornung said.

Trillium must still complete an environmental assessment and negotiate a long-term power supply deal with the Ontario Power Authority.





It’s about time Ontario takes a step to work towards becoming a leader in renewable energy.

Did you know that the Swedish government has implemented a 15 year plan, where they will have zero dependence on fossil fuels? While the rest of the world is killing each other over that last barrel of oil, burning every thing they can find to keep warm and salvaging any means of making a living for themselves in a devastated economy, the Swedes will be laughing it up and eating Swedish meatballs.
 
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kuba

TRIBE Member
SuperKennyK said:
It’s about time Ontario takes a step to work towards becoming a leader in renewable energy.

Did you know that the Swedish government has implemented a 15 year plan, where they will have zero dependence on fossil fuels? While the rest of the world is killing each other over that last barrel of oil, burning every thing they can find to keep warm and salvaging any means of making a living for themselves in a devastated economy, the Swedes will be laughing it up and eating Swedish meatballs.

And producing more swedish blondes!

YAY!

However, blondes are expected to be extinct within 200 years :(
 

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
SuperKennyK said:
Did you know that the Swedish government has implemented a 15 year plan, where they will have zero dependence on fossil fuels? While the rest of the world is killing each other over that last barrel of oil, burning every thing they can find to keep warm and salvaging any means of making a living for themselves in a devastated economy, the Swedes will be laughing it up and eating Swedish meatballs.

Don't the Swedes also have rediculous amounts of geothermal energy? Or is that just in Iceland?

I know that in Iceland, that makes a huge difference since they're basically sitting on a giant stack of free and clean energy, but I can't remember if the Swedes get some of that action too.

edit... found my own answer and geothermal energy is pretty limited in Sweden.

http://www.sweden.se/templates/cs/Article____8796.aspx
 
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TrIbAlNuT

TRIBE Member
SuperKennyK said:
A Toronto company wants to ERECT more than 140 massive wind turbines down the middle of Lake Ontario in what would become the largest wind farm in North America.

Im in favour of anything that gets erect-ed.
 

Sleepy Giant

TRIBE Member
How is biofuel any better than clean coal or natural gas? You are still burning something and creating CO2 emissions.

It's not exactly environmentally 'free' either.
 

VinylRach

TRIBE Promoter
when we were driving through the desert to Coachella they've got HUGE farms of these EVERYWHERE it was fucked i felt like i was in an alien movie
 

littlejon

TRIBE Member
the swedes are also way ahead of us with incineration of waste to energy.


Where incineration is not a dirty word

As Toronto battles to find a solution to its garbage crisis, Sweden offers a solution May 10, 2006. 01:00 AM MAGNUS SCHÖNNING

The industrialized world produces a never before seen amount of wealth and goods for its citizens. This is true for both Sweden and Canada. One needn't look far, however, to see how this generation of richness is slowly burying us in a mountain of waste.

In Canada, two examples come immediately to mind.

Toronto sends more than 975,000 tonnes of its household garbage to Michigan every year, while Ottawa residents are currently embroiled in a fierce debate about the expansion of a local landfill.

Canadian cities could learn a lot from the Swedish approach to waste management.

Sweden's view on basically all environmental problems is to take a holistic approach and acknowledge the complexity of the issues. There is never a quick fix, and policies, regulations and actions must be taken at all levels of society and be adapted to regional and local needs.

The goal of waste management, in any country, should be to reduce the total amount of garbage generated, while reusing as much of what remains.

In Sweden, more than 90 per cent of household waste is recycled, reused or recovered.

By contrast, Toronto diverts about half of its household garbage from landfill and Ottawa diverts about one-third.

Things began to change when the Swedish government made the producers and distributors of goods responsible for the waste they create.

By law, companies are responsible for collecting the entire waste stream stemming from their products, either on their own or through public or private contractors.

Needless to say, there is a strong economic incentive for companies to produce less waste — from products and product packaging — at the outset of manufacturing, rather than deal with it later.

By mixing economic incentives, such as garbage collection fees, with easy access to recycling stations and public awareness campaigns, Sweden has achieved very high recycling rates.

In 2004, Swedes recycled 96 per cent of all glass packaging, 95 per cent of metal, 86 per cent of corrugated cardboard and 80 per cent of electronic waste.

Waste that cannot be recycled is recovered through other means, often to local economic benefit.

In 2005, Sweden made it illegal to landfill organic waste. Instead, the waste is biologically treated to create compost, biogas and fertilizer. Today, 10 per cent of all household organic waste is treated biologically, a share that is expected to increase dramatically in the near future.

But even reducing, recycling and biological treatment only gets rid of so much. So, like many other European countries, Sweden uses the remaining waste to create energy.

Thanks to a well-developed district energy system, household waste is turned into heat and electricity for hundreds of thousands of Swedish homes.

Waste-to-energy through incineration has, in Canada at least, a reputation as an environmentally hazardous process. The truth is that modern technology has cut emissions dramatically, particularly in the case of dioxins.

Fifteen years ago, 18 Swedish waste incineration plants emitted a total of about 100 grams of dioxins every year.

Today, the collective dioxin emissions from all 29 Swedish waste incineration plants amounts to 0.7 of a gram ... quite an improvement.

At the same time, these plants have more than doubled the amount of energy produced in 1985.

I had the opportunity to visit a Swedish waste-to-energy plant in Malmö and was amazed at how clean and technologically advanced it was.

Going into the main control room was like stepping into a fusion of Star Trek and IKEA. The operator sat in a comfy chair and controlled the waste going into the incinerator with a joystick. No smells, no noise — in fact, a very pleasant work environment.

Using waste instead of fossil fuels to power district energy systems has also lowered Sweden's greenhouse gas emissions, which are three times lower per capita than in Canada.

But even without all of these environmental benefits, waste incineration makes good business sense.

The Sävenäs waste-to-energy plant, located just 200 metres from the nearest residential area, is a case in point.

The plant incinerates about 460,000 tonnes of waste every year to produce heat and electricity, power that is sold to Sweden's deregulated electricity market.

The facility cost $286 million to build and, with annual revenues of between $36 million and $70 million, the plant will pay for itself in less than 10 years.

Waste will always be a part of our everyday life but in Sweden, we have recognized it as a valuable resource. It can be turned into compost to improve soil, biogas to fuel our cars, and heat and electricity to power our homes.

Why just throw it away when so much good can come from it?
link
 
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SuperKennyK

TRIBE Member
Sleepy Giant said:
How is biofuel any better than clean coal or natural gas? You are still burning something and creating CO2 emissions.

It's not exactly environmentally 'free' either.


Is this a fact? Then what's the whole point of this ethanol implementation plan? I used to drink ethanol when I was in Kuwait.
 

Sleepy Giant

TRIBE Member
SuperKennyK said:
Is this a fact? Then what's the whole point of this ethanol implementation plan? I used to drink ethanol when I was in Kuwait.
Ethanol is to move away from oil. I can see the logic in that. Maybe the biofuel is along the same lines.

I question if it's better for the environment and how 'clean' the energy is.
 

SuperKennyK

TRIBE Member
littlejon said:
the swedes are also way ahead of us with incineration of waste to energy.


Lets just listen to the Americans and our government and pretend that these goals are impossible. More oil and killing arabs is the only solution. :rolleyes:
 

SuperKennyK

TRIBE Member
Sleepy Giant said:
Ethanol is to move away from oil. I can see the logic in that. Maybe the biofuel is along the same lines.

I question if it's better for the environment and how 'clean' the energy is.


Hmmm, I never thought of that. I guess it is still better to move away from a dependance on fossil fuels.
 
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coleridge

TRIBE Member
This would be awesome. Imagine heading up the CN tower and being able to see a huge farm of wind turbines out on the lake.
 
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D1Willow

TRIBE Member
I toked before reading this, put on the rubber gloves and sorted out te garbage we have in our apatrment, as well as putting up signs to be more responsible with throwing stuff out.
Good article. Better pot apearently.
 

Dialog

TRIBE Member
However, NOW magazine is always there to let us know that the numbers on incineration are all fudged and it’s a horribly dirty practice, and that the only way is for each and every Torontonian to become a composting, label-removing recycling ecofetishist like their editorial staff is, which is a pipedream, thus ensuring the status quo—or worse—remains a little longer.

Funny, as they usually endorse whatever Swedish people do anywhere, outright.

Note: actually, I do remove labels when I recycle *shrug*
 
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