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New Orleans....

basilisk

TRIBE Member
FYI I'm talking about the levee breach on Tuesday or whatever it was - not sure what they're doing now as far as strategic breaks go, if that's what the discussion is. Link?
 

Spinsah

TRIBE Member
HAL-9000 and I aren't talking about the Tuesday breach, but rather the recent one which was documented on CNN. I'm trying to turn up a link right now and can't.

Maybe the capitalists erased them all?
 
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randyval

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by basilisk
Oh but that would just make too much sense! It might require some basic understanding of the concept of "sea level" and the fact that some stuff is above or below it.

The whole idea is asinine... blowing up the levees to save the houses of rich people? Give me a fucking break.
the fact that its asinine is not good enough reason for me to dismiss the idea, there are plenty of asinine people in charge of the whole mess.
if in fact there was a bombing i would expect lots of conferming reports coming from resedents who were in the area at the time,and not just an isolated few.
i would not put it past the US govenement to pull off a stunt like that.
just look at thier track reccord, i think it speaks for itself.

when the floodway was built around winnipeg, it subsequently flooded southern towns, that otherwise would have been in less danger of flooding.
it was built in the mind to save downtown, at the expense of the smaller less valuble smaller towns.
 

scruffy1

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by basilisk

You don't shoot a missile at a levee to save something - that doesn't make a bit of sense. The whole thing is shaped like a bowl, as they've stated on teh news a thousand times. If you break the levee in one place, the rest of that shiz is gonna fill up. Why would they have had to break the levee to save something anyway? Do some thinking here and if anyone comes up with something remotely resembling a logical argument, spill it. Otherwise I'm going to shoot a missile at the next person who says something silly about 'capitalism in action'.
Actually, I can't find the link just now, they DID break parts of the levee to allow the waters to drain back into one of the lower lakes around the city.... this of course was because there are no pumps and if the levee is holding the water in, rather than out, it would make sense to break it. A little different though then what is being talked about here.


I will not search for the link because I am now leaving work and want to go home to eat, sleep and do nothing.
 

Bass-Invader

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Spinsah
HAL-9000 and I aren't talking about the Tuesday breach, but rather the recent one which was documented on CNN. I'm trying to turn up a link right now and can't.

Maybe the capitalists erased them all?
when was this supposed to have happened?
 

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by KiFe
"These people are SO poor and SO hideously amphibious..."
HISSSAAAAAAAAAA!!




Thankfully, the materials required to make a weapon have been left on the planet surface. What we have to do now is figure out how...
 

Spinsah

TRIBE Member
Did anyone hear about Cuba's offer to the US? They had 1500 medical professionals all ready to go. Fidel even held a big conference with them all with their packs out and ready to depart.

Not suprisingly, the US turned this offer down.
 

MrMarcus

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Spinsah
Did anyone hear about Cuba's offer to the US? They had 1500 medical professionals all ready to go. Fidel even held a big conference with them all with their packs out and ready to depart.

Not suprisingly, the US turned this offer down.
yeah, they were talking about it on howard stern this morning.
 

kerouacdude

TRIBE Member
from NPR

After Katrina: Web Exclusives
A Doctor's Message from Katrina's Front Lines

Images from Armstrong Airport
Sep. 8, 2005
Makeshift Medicine in New Orleans


All we could do was provide the barest amount of comfort care. We watched many, many people die. We practiced medical triage at its most basic -- "black-tagging" the sickest people and culling them from the masses so that they could die in a separate area.


NPR.org, September 7, 2005 Hemant Vankawala, 34, is a doctor with one of the nine Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) medical groups set up at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport, treating evacuees from New Orleans. He is an emergency room physician in Dallas, Texas, and joined a Dallas-based DMAT just two months ago -- just in time for the biggest natural disaster in American history.

Here are excerpts from an e-mail he sent to family, friends and colleagues about his experience:

My team was activated 11 days ago. For the past eight days, I have been living and working at the New Orleans airport, delivering medical care to the Katrina hurricane survivors.

Let me start by saying that I am safe, and after a very rough first week am now better-rested and fed. Our team was the first to arrive at the airport and set up our field hospital. We watched our population grow from 30 DMAT personnel taking care of six patients and two security guards [to] around 10,000 people in the first 15 hours.

These people had had no food or water or security for several days and were tired, frustrated, sick, wet, and heartbroken. People were brought in by trucks, buses, ambulances, school buses, cars and helicopters. We received patients from hospitals, schools, homes ... the entire remaining population of New Orleans, funneled through our doors.

Our little civilian team, along with a couple of other DMAT teams, set up and ran the biggest evacuation this country has ever seen. The numbers are absolutely staggering.

In hindsight, it seems silly that a bunch of civilian yahoos came in and took over the airport and had it up and running -- exceeding its normal operating load of passengers -- with an untrained skeleton crew and generator partial power. But we did what we had to do, and I think we did it well.

Our team has been working the flight line, off-loading helos [helicopters]. Overnight, we turned New Orleans' airport into the busiest helicopter base in the entire world. At any given time, there were at least eight to 10 helos off-loading on the tarmac, each filled with 10 to 40 survivors at a time, with 10 circling to land ... It was a non-stop, never-ending, 24-hour-a-day operation.

The CNN footage does not even begin to do it justice -- the roar of rotor blades, the smell of jet-A [fuel] and the thousands of eyes looking at us for answers, for hope...

Our busiest day, we off-loaded just under 15,000 patients by air and ground. At that time, we had about 30 medical providers and 100 ancillary staff. All we could do was provide the barest amount of comfort care. We watched many, many people die. We practiced medical triage at its most basic -- "black-tagging" the sickest people and culling them from the masses so that they could die in a separate area.

I cannot even begin to describe the transformation in my own sensibilities, from my normal practice of medicine to the reality of the operation here. We were so short on wheelchairs and litters we had to stack patients in airport chairs and lay them on the floor. They remained there for hours, too tired to be frightened, too weak to care about their urine- and stool-soaked clothing, too desperate to even ask what was going to happen next.

Imagine trading single-patient-use latex gloves for a pair of thick leather work gloves that never came off your hands -- then you can begin to imagine what it was like.

We did not practice medicine. There was nothing sexy or glamorous or routine about what we did. We moved hundreds of patients an hour, thousands of patients a day, off the flightline and into the terminal and baggage area. Patients were loaded onto baggage carts and trucked to the baggage area ... like, well, baggage. And there was no time to talk, no time to cry, no time to think, because they kept on coming. Our only salvation was when the bureaucratic Washington machine was able to ramp up and streamline the exodus of patients out of here.

Our team worked a couple of shifts in the medical tent as well. Imagine people so desperate, so sick, so like the five to 10 "true" emergencies you may get on a shift ... only coming through the door non-stop. Now imagine having no beds, no [oxygen], no nothing -- except some nitro, aspirin and all the good intentions in the world.

We did everything from delivering babies to simply providing morphine and a blanket to septic and critical patients, and allowing them to die.

During the days that it took for that exodus to occur, we filled the airport to its bursting point. There was a time when there were 16,000 angry, tired, frustrated people here. There were stabbings, rapes and people on the verge of mobbing. The flightline, lined with two parallel rows of Dauphins, Sea Kings, Hueys, Chinooks and every other kind of helicopter imaginable, was a dangerous place -- but we were much more frightened whenever we entered the sea of displaced humanity that had filled every nook and cranny of the airport.

[It's] only now that the thousands of survivors have been evacuated -- and the floors soaked in bleach, the putrid air allowed to exchange for fresh, the number of soldiers [outnumbering] the patients -- that we feel safe.

I have met so many people while down here -- people who were at Ground Zero at 9-11, people who have done tsunami relief, tours in Iraq -- and every one of them has said this is the worst thing they have ever seen. It's unanimous, and these are some battle-worn veterans of every kind of disaster you can imagine.

For those of you who want to help, the next step is to help [evacuees] who arrive in your local area. The only real medical care these survivors will receive is once they land in a safe, clean area far from here. For the 50,000 people we ran through this airport over the last couple of days -- if they were able to survive and make it somewhere else -- their care will begin only when providers in Dallas and Houston and Chicago and Baton Rouge volunteer at the shelters and provide care.

And yes, there are many, many more on their way. Many of the sickest simply died while here at the airport. Many have been stressed beyond measure and will die shortly, even though they were evacuated. If you are not medical, then go the shelters, hold hands, give hugs and prayers. If nothing else, it will remind you how much you have, and how grateful we all should be.

These people have nothing. Not only have they lost their material possessions and homes, many have lost their children, spouses, parents, arms, legs, vision... everything that is important.

Talk to these survivors, hear their stories and what they have been through. Look into their eyes. You will never think of America the same way. You will never look at your family the same way. You will never look at your home the same way. And I promise, it will forever change the way you practice medicine.

Hemant H. Vankawala, M.D.
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
WE ARE TO BELIEVE THAT WHILE GEORGE W BUSH CAN PURSUE A GLOBAL STRATEGY THAT REQUIRES A SEEMINGLY IMPOSSIBLE PATH AGAINST THE WILL OF VIRTUALLY THE ENTIRE WORLD, IS COMPLETELY UNABLE TO USURP THE BUREAUCRATIC WILL OF A SINGLE STATE IN HIS OWN COUNTRY?????



I fucking think not.




I think it is because George W Bush and the other bitches who finger him care not for "people".
 
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