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Movies

Alex D. from TRIBE on Utility Room

Bernnie Federko

TRIBE Member
For a 3.5 hour movie - it didnt feel its length - and thats super high praise I think..;)

Exactly. For me, the line is Jackie Brown. Even at 2.5 hours, and with great scenes, I couldn't and still can't sit through it. I didn't have any issue with Irishman, at an hour beyond that. Fantastic pacing, IMHO.
 

JuJuHound

TRIBE Member
Uncut Gems - Sandler decided to start acting and gives a great performance. Background music is what makes this movie even more epic.
Garnett is good too!
 
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rave jedi

TRIBE Member
Lots of mixed reviews once again for these episodes of the sequel trilogy which concluded the Skywalker saga.

Liked it enough, so I'm seeing it again over the holidays. :cool:

 
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praktik

TRIBE Member
Lots of mixed reviews once again for these episodes of the sequel trilogy which concluded the Skywalker saga.

Liked it enough, so I'm seeing it again over the holidays. :cool:


It's a bit of a mystery to me given how absolute appalling the first three eps done by Lucas were, that these ones get so much shit tossed at them - like are we forgetting how low the bar was??
 
The new Star Wars, for me is similar to The Matrix: Revolutions or what Spectre was to Skyfall in the James Bond series: great set up with the previous two movies (The Force Awakens and The Last Jedi especially - took Star Wars into a whole new direction) and does nothing with them. Goes the safe route of mostly fan service. It even felt a bit like what Alien: Covenant was to Prometheus - some fixing of plot details from the previous movie (we finally get a bit of an explanation with Leia's Mary Poppins bit in The Last Jedi).

I didn't hate it, just felt like all the hoopla that had been built up was overblown. Some great Star Wars moments in the film, but they're sprinkled a bit few and far between.
 
Spoiler for Dolittle

Did you guys know that the end of Dolittle has Robert Downey Jr. pulling a set of bagpipes that was lodged in a dragon's asshole?

I was completely sober when I wrote that - and it's true. Not a joke.
 
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Watched Army of the Dead, which really, really, really borrows and owes a lot to Aliens, right down to characters, story beats, plot points and even deaths. There's a lot of things to like about the movie, casting of people like Tig Notaro and Dave Bautista helps, the characters are each distinct individuals and despite being 35 years old - Aliens is a very solid architecture to build a story on. The opening sequence is probably the best part of the movie, but there are some effectively well shot action sequences, some gorgeous Renaissance painting like moments and he can make busy onscreen gunplay pretty easy to follow and exciting to watch - think the first Predator movie, and, of course, Aliens.

Thing is, it leans so heavily on Aliens at times, you can't help but think that Aliens did most of what's going onscreen better, with much, much less.

I didn't love it, there's more to like than dislike about the movie, but it didn't feel like it was quite as good as it should be as a whole. And despite it not feeling it, it's a pretty long movie at 2.5 hours. I'm likely never going to watch this again, unless it's on a date and I really like her.
 
I look back at my review of Joker, and it's funny how much my opinion of it has changed.

I still think Joaquim Pheonix's performance is once of the best that year, but the movie's changed in context over the years. It feels less about a movie that was about mental illness and kind of turned it into something a bit more twisted. It's almost I like it a bit less each time I see it.

I'm really curious how the movie is going to age in about 10 or 20 years.
 
Wrath of Man is really, really good - way above par for Jason Statham's usual actioners, and a really strong and steady hand behind the camera with Guy Ritchie directing. Some might dismiss it as being a typical Statham action film with some clever British themed wordplay, but there's a lot more to it.

Sort of like how Nobody could be dismissed as another dad action film, when there's a much more darker tone to the film - a man doing everything he can to protect the illusion that he created for himself of normalcy and coming to terms with the lie and how at odds it is with his past.
 

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
Wrath of Man is really, really good - way above par for Jason Statham's usual actioners, and a really strong and steady hand behind the camera with Guy Ritchie directing. Some might dismiss it as being a typical Statham action film with some clever British themed wordplay, but there's a lot more to it.

Sort of like how Nobody could be dismissed as another dad action film, when there's a much more darker tone to the film - a man doing everything he can to protect the illusion that he created for himself of normalcy and coming to terms with the lie and how at odds it is with his past.
must watch this
 

praktik

TRIBE Member
Wrath of Man is really, really good - way above par for Jason Statham's usual actioners, and a really strong and steady hand behind the camera with Guy Ritchie directing. Some might dismiss it as being a typical Statham action film with some clever British themed wordplay, but there's a lot more to it.

Sort of like how Nobody could be dismissed as another dad action film, when there's a much more darker tone to the film - a man doing everything he can to protect the illusion that he created for himself of normalcy and coming to terms with the lie and how at odds it is with his past.

thanks its on deck and this will have me prioritize it for this weekend!
 
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The Tomorrow War - the first hour and a half actually pretty good, despite not having an original idea in it's head. The amount of sci fi films it borrows from is pretty immense - the biggest influences seem to be Edge of Tomorrow, Alien, Aliens and Starship Troopers (not the sarcastic tone - the hordes of alien fighting) but having none of what made those films so entertaining. The selection of who gets drafted to fight in the future is a very interesting idea that never gets expanded upon (almost all fighters recruited are over 40, to avoid any kind of time paradox - cool paradox proof idea for time travel fighting). Chris Pratt is pretty good in the film, but this isn't showcases of his talents - he's just there to hold a gun, look grim when the odds are against him and look good. It's JK Simmons - the guy who played J Jonah Jameson in the Spider Man movies - who's the real surprise in this - he's friggin ripped in this.

Then in the last 45 minutes, I'm not sure why, but the movie kind of collapses on itself and just about gives in to every single sci fi trope imaginable. It's one of those big ass, not very satisfying summer blockbusters - but made it to streaming instead of theatres, which kind of diminishes my disappointment. The first hour and a half is worth watching.
 
If you want proof that our standards in what we find entertaining have dropped massively since COVID, just watch Fast and Furious 9

There's about 45 minutes devoted to two of the characters literally driving their way into space. Not kidding. Thelma and Louise's ending ain't got shit on this.

And the Looney Toons physics that they consistently pull off in this weird alternate dimension they live in doesn't help either.
 
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For new Neeson fare kind of liked both The Ice Road and the Marksman. Both kind of pulpy movies, but effective, not over long and fuck, whynot?
He's a consistent bet for the Dad action genre, and been doing it now for nearly 15 years. Might not all be solid, but he hooks up with some pretty talented directors who can stage a pretty good car chase or firefight.

Thing is too, a lot of the directors move on to bigger and better projects - these projects are actually a pretty good stepping stone for a new, young director - medium budget, good professional cast involved and usually a lot of room for the director to strut their stuff and show what they can do. Teach them how to manage a larger production and special effects budget that isn't some mega summer blockbuster tentpole that has a studio's future hanging on it.
 
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Suicide Squad is probably James Gunn's best movie. The first 10 minutes makes it abundantly clear that no character is safe from death, and sets the pace for the rest of the film.

It's nowhere nearly as dour and drab as the previous attempt by David Ayer a few years ago, and the film embraces a lot of James Gunn's older works - back to the gallows humour of Dawn of the Dead, Super, Slither and other Troma like movies. It's nice to see a superhero movie so gleefully weird and touching at the same time, a real achievement for a DC movie to say the least.
 
Neill Blomkamp - the director of District 9 and diminishing returns since - has released a new movie shot during the pandemic called Demonic, what seems to be a try at the horror movie genre, but still retaining his trademark look and themes.

It's not a great film - the idea is pretty interesting - think of it being a cross of The Exorcist crossed with The Cell, Lawnmower Man and even John Carpenter's Vampires. The first half of it builds up nicely but starts to become increasingly frayed and scattered as the movie continues.

I really didn't think he could deliver something as bad as Chappie, but he's come close with this.
 
The new Candyman movie jettisons the sequels and expands on the original, much like the recent Halloween movie did. It honors the original and builds on it's mythology and theme of an urban legend evolving and adapting to modern times. Highly recommended.
 
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