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Michelle Wie DQ'd from 1st Pro Tourney

SJN

TRIBE Member
Link

Wie finished 4th, but was subsequently DQ'd as a result of taking a bad drop (by less than a foot) during Saturday's round.

Michael Bamberger (an SI reporter) told tour officials after Sunday's round that he was concerned about a drop she took on Saturday. They went out with Wie and her caddy, measured it, and determined she had taken a bad drop -- as a result, she signed an incorrect scorecard on Saturday and had to be DQ'd under the rules.

Bamberger is an asinine little prick as far as I'm concerned. If he had raised the matter during Saturday's round, Wie could have corrected her scorecard, taken a 2stoke penalty, and stayed in the tournament. Instead, he waited until after Sunday's round to speak up. She's 16, and the future of women's golf -- what the hell is his problem.


In related news, Kevin Stadler was DQ'd from the final round of this week's PGA event, while in 5th place. While on the course, he called a Tour official because one of his shafts was bent. Under the rules, he had to be DQ'd. Stupid.
 

SJN

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Liquidity
well, that's the rules. it's ultimately the players responsibility.
of course. It's her responsibility, she made a mistake unknowingly, and she paid for it. What's asinine is that Bamberger saw it happen, thought something might be wrong, and didn't say anything. The next day, after she's played another round, he speaks up and gets her DQ'd. He should have said something when he saw her drop on saturday.
 

Vote Quimby

TRIBE Member
This is why golf rules are so stupid at times.

Instead of calling her on her actions immediately, a frikken reporter waits until the next day, after she's finished her next round and signed her scorecard before alerting officials. Retarded.

If no one says anything the day of the round, then the player should be in the clear. Otherwise, what is to stop people from looking through old footage to find mistakes made by tournament winners?

This reminds of the time some viewer called into CBS because some player made a mistake and no one on the course called him on it. Needless to say, he was DQ'd as officials reviewed footage provided by CBS after he signed his scorecard.
 

Jeremy Jive

TRIBE Member
The reporter is just a prick plain and simple. He obviously waited so that he could controversy and get his name in the papers as the one who started the story. He saw an opportunity and took it.

I hope Nike and Sony make it so he never works another sports day in his life.
 

Liquidity

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Jeremy Jive
The reporter is just a prick plain and simple. He obviously waited so that he could controversy and get his name in the papers as the one who started the story. He saw an opportunity and took it.

I hope Nike and Sony make it so he never works another sports day in his life.
well, the added publicity and the image of wie as "victim" may add to her marketability... we barely even got to hear about sorenstam blowing away the competition by 8 strokes...
 
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