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Massive subwoofer repair - Basstech 7

Discussion in 'Electronic Music Producers Forum' started by ghaleon, May 8, 2008.

  1. ghaleon

    ghaleon TRIBE Member

  2. Dr. Grinch

    Dr. Grinch TRIBE Member

    I had a 15" Woofer rebuilt some years ago by a company in Scarborough. Cost me $130 to have it done, but it was a full rebuild of an expensive Trace-Elliot woofer. Sounds like the cones are likely torn on the woofers in your box, will probably need a full recone.
    Pull them out of the cabinets and see what's up, see if the voice coils are crunchy. See if they're paper cones or if they're rubber/composite. If they're rubber you can do a ghetto fix and use Silicone from a fish tank to fix them :D
     
  3. ghaleon

    ghaleon TRIBE Member

    Apparenty, replacement cones could be a problem, as they are custom altered. I'm in touch with the guy that engineered this thing - the company, servodrive, still exists, but they don't make this model anymore.

    But you're right, the typical failure points are the cones, or the belt that drives them. The woofers are two 15" cones. Do you know the name of the company in scarbourough?

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Dr. Grinch

    Dr. Grinch TRIBE Member

    It was years ago, but I think it might have been these guys

    Pro Speaker Repair
    (416) 239-2817

    They do reconing, and custom repairs of all sorts.

    In other news, that cabinet is pretty meaty dude.
    You got enough amplifier to actually drive that thing?!
     
  5. ghaleon

    ghaleon TRIBE Member

    Thanks!

    From the specs, it will handle 400 watts RMS and 800 at peak. I used to have a crest that put out 400 watts a side @ 8ohms - Any mid sized amp could be bridged mono, then you'd have plently of power.

    More pics to come
     
  6. unique2100

    unique2100 TRIBE Promoter

    Awesometastic. You can fix that up real purdy.
     
  7. Dr. Grinch

    Dr. Grinch TRIBE Member

  8. ghaleon

    ghaleon TRIBE Member

    The monoblocks are supposed to sound really nice :)

    So I took out the unit with the speakers and motor from that cavity, and upon inspection everything seems fine - belts are intact, cones seem to be in good shape... Maybe a little squeaky, but that could be normal. Next step is testing it and watching it work it's magic
     
  9. unique2100

    unique2100 TRIBE Promoter

    Hey Ryan I'm gonna try and make it by tonite to pick up those records, and check this monster out.
     
  10. Dr. Grinch

    Dr. Grinch TRIBE Member

    Any update on this project?
     
  11. ghaleon

    ghaleon TRIBE Member

    so far, I've taken the drive unit out of the bigger cabinet, and hooked that up to my car stereo amp. I played da phat conductor's glitch hop mix through it to test it.

    The thing absolutley pounds.... but there is definitely something up with it. You feel the bass in your chest, and you can hear it around the block. However, there is a distortion present that I've described before - it almost like a blown voice coil sound, but I know that's impossible b/c there are no voice coils involved. I think at this point I will have to disassemble the motor and go from there. Here's the last response I got from the guy that engineered this thing:

    A properly operating module, operated outside of the cabinet, will make some small amount of mechanical noise, most notably the "clicking" of the motor brushes as the shaft changes direction many times a second. Do not operate the module or complete subwoofer without a crossover high passed around 80-100hz. Have you used an air line with spritzer to blow any and all dust out of the motor, blower, the belts, arms, and generally any moving part?
    The worst case scenario is what you have to check for-is the motor damaged?
    You could have bad bearings, bad brushes, damaged commutator, overheated winding, or cracked winding. Typically, this means dismantling the motor from the drive shaft assembly, and get in your hands to look closely at it, and feel how it spins without anything attached.

    Best regards,

    John
     

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