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lower back pain & hip alignment

agentRC4

TRIBE Member
Polymorph said:
Hey. Research done.

I practice a combination of Feldenkrais, Swedish, and release technique.

(it's about using your own weight of your own body in the process...)

and I could fix his girl up there up in, oh, an hour or two...

And yes, I know of several cases where a choreo can totally throw yer back...

(and, yup, bias)


I can name at least 5-6 chiro's who suck balls and can name about 20-30 PT/MT who suck even worse.

Whats wrong with a chiro who does soft tissue work?

Most therapists on this board have a GOD complex thinking they are the only one who is any good and all other practitioners and therapies are wrong.

I say "GOOD DAY TO YOU" cause you are the worst kind out there.
 

Polymorph

TRIBE Member
agentRC4 said:
Whats wrong with a chiro who does soft tissue work?

Most therapists on this board have a GOD complex thinking they are the only one who is any good and all other practitioners and therapies are wrong.

I say "GOOD DAY TO YOU" cause you are the worst kind out there.

uh. no.

But anyways, if the practitioner knows what they are doing, then, all is well.

But sorry, idiot, but I really do have stories...
 
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debunct

TRIBE Promoter
OK....i still don't know why you said it that way.

I didn't mention that book because I "love" it. I mentioned it because there is pure evidence that knowledge is enough to alleviate the symptoms permanently. Read TMS.com if you know don't believe me. If someone just happens to be lurking on this board suffering in the same state, looking for answers that no chiro or ART specialist hasn't been able to give them, maybe, just maybe it might help. that is all.

It is easy to see why people in the "back" industry would resist his theory only because they simply don't know. How can a chiropractor know about emotions when all they have been taught is to look at things from a physical perspective? There is no blame, it is more of just an unintelligent society.

I go to a chiropractor for regular maintenance myself and he has been completely open to my experience and has used this knowledge himself to help his patients. A chiropractor, physio, all that stuff is good, but not for what you think you are doing. We solve the root problem and then good maintenance is where it is at.

Cheers.
 

MissBlu

TRIBE Member
debunct said:
It is easy to see why people in the "back" industry would resist his theory only because they simply don't know. How can a chiropractor know about emotions when all they have been taught is to look at things from a physical perspective? There is no blame, it is more of just an unintelligent society.

I go to a chiropractor for regular maintenance myself and he has been completely open to my experience and has used this knowledge himself to help his patients. A chiropractor, physio, all that stuff is good, but not for what you think you are doing. We solve the root problem and then good maintenance is where it is at.

Cheers.

There are so many things that worry me about the two posts in this thread...
If you step off a curb wrong and pull a muscle, is that due to emotion your holding in????




My physio therepist is doing some research on the back/spine/muscle & nerve area and how it effects the many different parts of the body, and how massage, physio, etc. can be used to help out other body issues. I should tell her it is all due to emotions, and that she is wasting her time.
 

debunct

TRIBE Promoter
i think i mentioned that we were talking about "chronic" pain.

i have been around this debate for years now...what you are saying is nothing new to me. of course, if you pull a muscle stepping off the street then you have an injury.

do a google search on Tension Mytosis Syndrome. see what you can find.
 

agentRC4

TRIBE Member
Polymorph said:
uh. no.

But anyways, if the practitioner knows what they are doing, then, all is well.

But sorry, idiot, but I really do have stories...


I rest my case. Proof is in the posts.
 
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KiX

TRIBE Member
Polymorph said:
'na. Sorry. But Chiros are the Quick Fix, the fast-food of physiotherapy.

Go see a real physio who practices release-technique, and get the long-term benefits.

PS: one wrong wrench, and a Chiro can totally destroy your spine.

whoa whoa whoa, might not want to be so quick to totally blacklist an entire health care profession, especially if you claim to be a practitioner yourself.

first off, chiros aren't just about cracking spines. they're fully qualified rehabilitation specialists, just as a physio is. as with all things, there are good ones and bad ones. The chiro i work with is an awesome rehab practitioner and doesn't just practice to be a quick fix for people, he designs treatment plans to see a person get 100% better using a variety of modalities.

a chiro can "totally destroy your spine" the same way a physio, massage therapist, athletic therapist, kin, osteopath, etc etc etc... can also "totally destroy your spine" or injure you if they don't pay attention to contraindications, or perform carelessly.... but it's not a big risk at all if you have someone who knows what they're doing, or it wouldn't be an accepted treatment modality. And as long as your practitioner is competent, as with all practitioners, you can trust that your treatment will be for your benefit. Chiropractic adjustments can be an excellent part of a rehabilitation plan, especially something joint-mechanics related. They're experts. You shouldn't be so quick to dismiss it like you are.

Truth of it is there are a variety of health care practitioners that are competent at postural/muscular alignment (osteopaths, RMTs, physios, chiros, etc..) and each will have their own modalities and offer you various levels and options of care. Regardelss of the way you go, you need a full assessment to see the full scope of your issue, probably some form of manual soft tissue treatment/postural alignment and a good self care program that stretches and strengthens where you need it. Might want to start on some core stability exercises also. Each of these practitioners should be able to offer you all of that.

debunct: i believe strongly in the mind-body connection and see it's effects daily, but dude, a curved spine is a curved spine. You can't argue with the physiological effects of scoliosis on the body, especially the low back and pelvis.

agentRC4: lol ironing=delicious! ;)

=tina=
 

the_fornicator

TRIBE Member
umm, also tell her to have better posture when doing everything... walking, sitting, standing, etc.

in my experience, bad posture is the main cause for people's back problems.
 

Polymorph

TRIBE Member
agentRC4 said:
I rest my case. Proof is in the posts.

I was going to make an intelligent post here, but, fuck that. Let's just get to the chase. Yer a tool.

Anyways. Trying to take the balanced pov here. Not all chiros are spine-destroyers. But some are. So, message sent. Watch yer back.
 

kyfe

TRIBE Member
sugar said:
Nah, sorry. Wrong.

I'd do a little research on the subject if I were you.

agreed, chiro is great if you find a good one, mine's been practicing for over 30 years and is awesome.

he fixed my back about 2 years ago and I think I've had to see him twice since

there are alot of misconceptions about this type of medical practice.
 
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i lix

TRIBE Member
if you've only had back pain for a day or two then try resting, a hot pad, gentle stretching and self-massage... if you have chronic pain then find what works for you.

i recently tried accupuncture after years of going on and off to a chiropractor. (combination of naturally bad alignment + degeneration from injury + anxiety = daily pain) i felt that the manipulations at the chiropractor wasn't good for me. the accupunture sessions were way longer so i could actually reach a state of relaxation, but the needle sensations are intense sometimes and i found that i was tender for a few hours after treatment. i liked the fact that accupuncture helps you access energy within to heal yourself. unfortunatly i can't afford to go anywhere on a regular basis, so i don't know if anything will ever help me live pain-free.

also, i recently found some arnica in gel form (i'd tried homeopathic stuff and ointment). it acted like a mild topical analgesic, which i liked and found less of a bother than tiger balm.

good luck!
 

DeepSix

TRIBE Promoter
Wow these threads get funny fast.

Just like there are bad automechanics and good automechanics, there are bad therapists/chiros and good therapists/chiros for both soft tissue/musculoskeletal ailments. It's the the discipline that is bad or good, it's the practicioner. Much like a gun lol.

I think I posted a link before about how to pick a good chiro. It's much like picking a good canteloup - you just need to know what to look for. If I can find the link, I'll post it again - the same criteria can generally be applied to ANY health care practitioner, whether their privately or publically funded.

p.s. AgentRC, I was thinking the exact thing that KiX posted when I read your post ;)
 

Craigee

TRIBE Member
DeepSix said:
Just like there are bad automechanics and good automechanics, there are bad therapists/chiros and good therapists/chiros for both soft tissue/musculoskeletal ailments. It's the the discipline that is bad or good, it's the practicioner.

Well said. I used to think that chiropractic was total bs, because I saw a guy who did everything like he was reading it from a textbook.

After trying just about every possible therapy out there for back pain, I'm convinced that it's less about finding a particular therapy that's superior to all the others and more about the person who helps you get better. Do they listen to what you are saying? Are they willing to keep an open mind and explore ideas and practices that will work for you? Do they have training and experience? Do you feel comfortable with them? These things matter as much as their particular field of expertise, IMO.
 

DeepSix

TRIBE Promoter
the first 'the' in what I wrote should be 'not' but yeah, I totally agree with you Craigee. There is no superior therapy in general (though evidence will show that in specific cases, there are some that are more effacacious / effective than others) - it's more a case of finding the therapy that's right for the illness AND the client all in one. Not all people respond the same way to the same treatment for a multitude of reasons.

The listening, open mind, comfort, etc. that you talk about is part of what we term "therapeutic rapport". In the healing arts (because, let's face it - it's as much of an art as it is a science), the rapport you build with your clients/patients is key to gaining trust, "buy in" to a particular modality of treatment, and compliance. Also, a health care practitioner needs to know when they're not what the client needs and when another profession may suit them better.
 

lucky1

TRIBE Member
i lix said:
if you've only had back pain for a day or two then try resting, a hot pad, gentle stretching and self-massage... if you have chronic pain then find what works for you.

i recently tried accupuncture after years of going on and off to a chiropractor. (combination of naturally bad alignment + degeneration from injury + anxiety = daily pain) i felt that the manipulations at the chiropractor wasn't good for me. the accupunture sessions were way longer so i could actually reach a state of relaxation, but the needle sensations are intense sometimes and i found that i was tender for a few hours after treatment. i liked the fact that accupuncture helps you access energy within to heal yourself. unfortunatly i can't afford to go anywhere on a regular basis, so i don't know if anything will ever help me live pain-free.

also, i recently found some arnica in gel form (i'd tried homeopathic stuff and ointment). it acted like a mild topical analgesic, which i liked and found less of a bother than tiger balm.

good luck!

I go to the Canadian College of Naturopathic medicine Clinic and you are paired with a 4 year student and a qualified ND. The cost is about 50% what I paid in Private Practice.. They do acupuncture and Eastern medicine there. I'm starting acupuncture in a month or so... I'd totally recomend the clinic...

http://www.ccnm.edu/clinic/index.html
 
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KiX

TRIBE Member
DeepSix said:
the first 'the' in what I wrote should be 'not' but yeah, I totally agree with you Craigee. There is no superior therapy in general (though evidence will show that in specific cases, there are some that are more effacacious / effective than others) - it's more a case of finding the therapy that's right for the illness AND the client all in one. Not all people respond the same way to the same treatment for a multitude of reasons.

The listening, open mind, comfort, etc. that you talk about is part of what we term "therapeutic rapport". In the healing arts (because, let's face it - it's as much of an art as it is a science), the rapport you build with your clients/patients is key to gaining trust, "buy in" to a particular modality of treatment, and compliance. Also, a health care practitioner needs to know when they're not what the client needs and when another profession may suit them better.

<3 yes.
 

peko

TRIBE Member
DeepSix said:
the first 'the' in what I wrote should be 'not' but yeah, I totally agree with you Craigee. There is no superior therapy in general (though evidence will show that in specific cases, there are some that are more effacacious / effective than others) - it's more a case of finding the therapy that's right for the illness AND the client all in one. Not all people respond the same way to the same treatment for a multitude of reasons.

The listening, open mind, comfort, etc. that you talk about is part of what we term "therapeutic rapport". In the healing arts (because, let's face it - it's as much of an art as it is a science), the rapport you build with your clients/patients is key to gaining trust, "buy in" to a particular modality of treatment, and compliance. Also, a health care practitioner needs to know when they're not what the client needs and when another profession may suit them better.

get 3 opitons from different chiroprators before you sign on with just one.

chiro and physio is all private now - no OHIP coverage.... so, sometimes the first thing asked is if you have extended coverage.

A friend of mine went to a 'great chiro' when she was 24 years old - not once did the chiro ask her what kind of shoes she wore, what kind of work she did or that high heels aren't the best support... in fact, he told he she had some 'vertibre.. (something)', but that he could heal her if she came in for adjustments 3 times a week.

IRONY: My friend is a Thai Massage and Naturalpath Practioner and we laughed at whatever the chiro told her that she has ---> so does everyone else in the world with a vertibrate.

MORAL: Treat yourself better then you would a potential car, house or large purchase.... because Chrio's are money grabbers too - AND, it's your spine so treat it with care.

p.s. Some Chiro's will push a Naturalpath on you too ---> be careful when you smell a sales 'add on' (and I do believe in Naturalpaths) because it's all about 'a program which fits you best.'

p.p.s. If the Chiro does XRays onsite, I'd enquire about who is taking the XRAy and what their qualifications are ---> lots private clinics are cheap and only hire inexperienced staff to keep operation costs down.
 
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i lix

TRIBE Member
lucky1 said:
I go to the Canadian College of Naturopathic medicine Clinic and you are paired with a 4 year student and a qualified ND. The cost is about 50% what I paid in Private Practice.. They do acupuncture and Eastern medicine there. I'm starting acupuncture in a month or so... I'd totally recomend the clinic...

http://www.ccnm.edu/clinic/index.html

hey thanks

i went to a chiropractor clinic before though and i found it hard to repeat my medical history every semester or whatever. plus, i have some particular areas that having someone manipulate who was inexperienced (even when supervised) was a really bad idea. although, i don't think massage would be as much of a concern.

the accupuncturist i found charges a very resonable rate and is >5min by bike away. the problem is even at 50%, i suddenly became unemployed as of friday... so any price is too much until i find a new (and better) job...

*sigh*
 

DeepSix

TRIBE Promoter
Here's a link that has several other links with how-to's on picking a chiropractor (as it seems to be a much-maligned profession).

http://www.home-n-stuff.net/health/chiropractic.html

There's some really good information there, and much of it written by chiros on how to avoid the "bad eggs".

It's really the same as picking any thing. Make informed decisions. If you get a bad vibe, that's probably not the sign of a good relationship. If you feel like you're being "up sold" or like it's a "pressure sales" environment, look elsewhere.

Lastly, if you're not getting what you're paying for or if you have qualms about the practitioner, you have every right to leave and to choose another.
 
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