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Israel attacks aid convoy in international waters

Discussion in 'Politics (deprecated)' started by alexd, May 31, 2010.

  1. alexd

    alexd Administrator Staff Member

    Someone has to reign in Israel. Attacking aid ships in international waters, assassinating people in other countries, bombing UN facilities, forging passports of foreign states, the list of international crimes is getting larger and larger, and nobody seems to want to hold them to account for their actions.

    Benjamin Netanyahoo is in Canada now, meeting with Harper. After the meeting, Harper really ought to make a statement condemning piracy and attacks of aid convoys, but I suspect this is not going to happen.

    Disgusted.

    Spain & Sweden have recalled their ambassadors over this recent incident, France has come out with a strong condemnation of the attack. Come on Harper, do something.
     
  2. alexd

    alexd Administrator Staff Member

    from bbc

    More than 10 people have been killed after Israeli commandos stormed a convoy of ships carrying aid to the Gaza Strip, the Israeli army says.

    Armed forces boarded the largest vessel overnight, clashing with some of the 500 people on board.

    It happened about 40 miles (64 km) out to sea, in international waters.

    Israel says its soldiers were shot at and attacked with weapons; the activists say Israeli troops came on board shooting.

    The activists were attempting to defy a blockade imposed by Israel after the Islamist movement Hamas took power in Gaza in 2007.

    There has been widespread condemnation of the violence, with several countries summoning the Israeli ambassadors serving there.

    UN chief Ban Ki-moon said he was "shocked by reports of killings and injuries" and called for a "full investigation" into what happened.

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who is in Canada, has cancelled a scheduled visit to Washington on Tuesday to return to Israel, officials said.

    Earlier, he expressed his "full backing" for the military involved in the raid, his office said.

    The White House said the US "deeply regrets the loss of life and injuries sustained" in the storming of the aid ship.

    'Guns and knives'
    The six-ship flotilla, carrying 10,000 tonnes of aid, left the coast of Cyprus on Sunday and had been due to arrive in Gaza on Monday. Israel had repeatedly said the boats would not be allowed to reach Gaza.

    Israel says its soldiers boarded the lead ship in the early hours but were attacked with axes, knives, bars and at least two guns.

    "Unfortunately this group were dead-set on confrontation," Israeli government spokesman Mark Regev told the BBC.

    "Live fire was used against our forces. They initiated the violence, that's 100% clear," he said.

    Organisers of the flotilla said at least 30 people were wounded in the incident. Israel says 10 of its soldiers were injured, one seriously.

    A leader of Israel's Islamic Movement, Raed Salah, who was on board, was among those hurt.

    Audrey Bomse, a spokesperson for the Free Gaza Movement, which is behind the convoy, told the BBC Israel's actions were disproportionate.

    "We were not going to pose any violent resistance. The only resistance that there might be would be passive resistance such as physically blocking the steering room, or blocking the engine room downstairs, so that they couldn't get taken over. But that was just symbolic resistance."


    She said there was "absolutely no evidence of live fire".

    Israel is towing the boats to the port of Ashdod and says it will deport the passengers from there.

    Condemnation
    Turkish TV pictures taken on board the Turkish ship leading the flotilla appeared to show Israeli soldiers fighting to control passengers.


    The footage showed a number of people, apparently injured, lying on the ground. A woman was seen holding a blood-stained stretcher.

    Al-Jazeera TV reported from the same ship that Israeli navy forces had opened fire and boarded the vessel, wounding the captain.

    The Al-Jazeera broadcast ended with a voice shouting in Hebrew, saying: "Everybody shut up!"

    Israel's deputy Foreign Minister Danny Ayalon said his country "regrets any loss of life and did everything to avoid this outcome".

    He accused the convoy of a "premeditated and outrageous provocation", describing the flotilla as an "armada of hate".

    Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas condemned Israel's actions, saying it had committed a massacre, while Hamas said Israel had committed a "great crime and a huge violation of international law".

    Turkey, whose nationals comprised the majority of those on board, accused Israel of "targeting innocent civilians".

    "We strongly denounce Israel's inhumane interception," it said, warning of "irreparable consequences" to the two countries' relations.


    Danny Ayalon, Israeli deputy foreign minister: "The organisers' intent was violent."

    Turkey was Israel's closest Muslim ally but relations have deteriorated over the past few years.

    In Turkey, thousands of protesters demonstrated against Israel in Istanbul, while several countries have summoned Israeli ambassadors to seek an explanation as to what happened.

    Greece has withdrawn from joint military exercises with Israel in protest at the raid on the flotilla.

    Israel had repeatedly said it would stop the boats, calling the campaign a "provocation intended to delegitimise Israel".

    Israel says it allows about 15,000 tonnes of humanitarian aid into Gaza every week.

    But the UN says this is less than a quarter of what is needed.
     
  3. Persephone

    Persephone TRIBE Member

    And the plot thickens...against Israel

    BBC News - Witnesses cast doubt on Israel's convoy raid account

    Witnesses cast doubt on Israel's convoy raid account

    Eyewitness accounts from ships raided by Israeli commandos have cast doubt on Israel's version of events that led to the deaths of at least 10 people.

    Eyewitness accounts from ships raided by Israeli commandos have cast doubt on Israel's version of events that led to the deaths of at least 10 people.

    German pro-Palestinian activist Norman Paech said he had only seen wooden sticks being brandished as troops abseiled on to the deck of the ship.

    Israel says its soldiers were attacked with "knives, clubs and other weapons" and opened fire in self defence.

    The raid led to widespread condemnation and the UN has called for an inquiry.
    LEGALITY OF CONVOY RAID
    Continue reading the main story Mavi Marmara just before it left Istanbul on 22 May

    * The UN Charter on the Law of the Sea says only if a vessel is suspected to be transporting weapons, or weapons of mass destruction, can it be boarded in international waters. Otherwise the permission of the ship's flag carrying nation must be sought.
    * The charter allows for naval blockades, but the effect of the blockade on civilians must be proportionate to the effect on the military element for the blockade to be legally enforceable.
    * A ship trying to breach a blockade can be boarded and force may be used to stop it as long as it is "necessary and proportionate".
    * The Israeli Defense Forces say soldiers acted in self-defence.
    * An investigation, either by the UN or by the ship's flag-carrier Turkey, is required to find if the use of force was proportionate to a claim of self defence.

    Q&A: Israeli raid on aid flotilla Israeli raid: What went wrong? Guide: Gaza under blockade Convoy raid sparks press fury In pictures: Aid flotilla raid protests

    The six ships, carrying aid and campaigners, had sailed from Cyprus in a bid to break Israel's blockade of the Gaza Strip.

    "This was not an act of self-defence," said Mr Paech, a politician, as he arrived back in Berlin wrapped in a blue blanket.

    "Personally I saw two and a half wooden batons that were used... There was really nothing else. We never saw any knives.

    "This was an attack in international waters on a peaceful mission... This was a clear act of piracy," he added.

    Mr Paech had been a passenger on the Turkish passenger ship Mavi Marmara where most, if not all, of the deaths occurred.

    Fellow German activist Inge Hoeger said they had been on the ships "for peaceful purposes".

    "We wanted to transport aid to Gaza," she said. "No-one had a weapon."

    She added: "We were aware that this would not be a simple cruise across the sea to deliver the goods to Gaza. But we did not count on this kind of brutality."

    Activist Bayram Kalyon, arriving back in Istanbul, had also been a passenger on the Mavi Marmara.

    "The captain... told us 'They are firing randomly, they are breaking the windows and entering inside. So you should get out of here as soon as possible'. That was our last conversation with him."

    Meanwhile, in Nazareth, Israeli Arab MP Haneen Zuabi - who was on the flotilla - told a press conference that Israeli forces began firing while still in the helicopters hovering over the ships.

    "We are calling for an international committee to investigate this tragedy," she said.

    Diplomatic sources in Ankara have said at least four of those killed were Turkish. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said the assault was a "bloody massacre" and must be punished. He said Israel should not test Turkey's patience.
    UN criticism

    Further criticism of Israel came from UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon on Tuesday.

    In an interview with the AFP news agency he said Israel's blockade of Gaza was responsible for the deadly raid.

    "Had Israelis heeded to my call and to the call of the international community by lifting the blockade of Gaza, this tragic incident would not have happened," he said.

    Nato Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen called on Israel to release people and boats it had seized.

    He spoke after an emergency meeting of Nato ambassadors in Brussels called by Turkey.
    AT THE SCENE
    Continue reading the main story Jon Donnison
    Jon Donnison
    BBC News, Israel

    Here at Beersheva prison in the Negev Desert, in the sweltering heat, a procession of foreign diplomats and lawyers has been trying to gain access to the prisoners.

    Most have been let in and so has a party from the International Red Cross. Those who have come out have not said much more than that they have been able to see their prisoners.

    Behind the blue and white 8m-high concrete walls, more than 600 people are being held.

    For how long and to what purpose is not yet clear. Perspiring journalists can be seen scanning the Israeli newspapers, the headlines reading "Botched raid on Free Gaza Flotilla" and "Flotilla Fiasco".

    Renewed violence broke out in Gaza on Tuesday, with five Palestinians reportedly killed by Israeli fire.

    Two Palestinian gunmen were shot dead after crossing the border in the south of the territory, a military spokesman said.

    Three more people died in an Israeli strike in the north of Gaza, according to Gaza's emergency services. Israel said it carried out an air strike after two rockets were fired from Gaza.

    Following the Israeli sea-born raid, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak ordered the border crossing between Egypt and the Gaza Strip to be opened.

    The Rafah crossing has been closed since 2007, although special medical cases are occasionally allowed through.

    The Egyptian state news agency said the latest opening was to allow humanitarian aid through. It is not clear how long it will be kept open.

    The UN Security Council issued a statement after deliberating through the night.

    It said an investigation should be "prompt, impartial, credible and transparent". It also condemned the "acts" which led to the deaths.

    The six ships, carrying aid and campaigners, had sailed from Cyprus in a bid to break Israel's blockade of the Gaza Strip.

    "This was not an act of self-defence," said Mr Paech, a politician, as he arrived back in Berlin wrapped in a blue blanket.

    "Personally I saw two and a half wooden batons that were used... There was really nothing else. We never saw any knives.

    "This was an attack in international waters on a peaceful mission... This was a clear act of piracy," he added.

    Mr Paech had been a passenger on the Turkish passenger ship Mavi Marmara where most, if not all, of the deaths occurred.

    Fellow German activist Inge Hoeger said they had been on the ships "for peaceful purposes".

    "We wanted to transport aid to Gaza," she said. "No-one had a weapon."

    She added: "We were aware that this would not be a simple cruise across the sea to deliver the goods to Gaza. But we did not count on this kind of brutality."

    Activist Bayram Kalyon, arriving back in Istanbul, had also been a passenger on the Mavi Marmara.

    "The captain... told us 'They are firing randomly, they are breaking the windows and entering inside. So you should get out of here as soon as possible'. That was our last conversation with him."

    Meanwhile, in Nazareth, Israeli Arab MP Haneen Zuabi - who was on the flotilla - told a press conference that Israeli forces began firing while still in the helicopters hovering over the ships.

    "We are calling for an international committee to investigate this tragedy," she said.

    Diplomatic sources in Ankara have said at least four of those killed were Turkish. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said the assault was a "bloody massacre" and must be punished. He said Israel should not test Turkey's patience.
    UN criticism

    Further criticism of Israel came from UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon on Tuesday.

    In an interview with the AFP news agency he said Israel's blockade of Gaza was responsible for the deadly raid.

    "Had Israelis heeded to my call and to the call of the international community by lifting the blockade of Gaza, this tragic incident would not have happened," he said.

    Nato Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen called on Israel to release people and boats it had seized.

    He spoke after an emergency meeting of Nato ambassadors in Brussels called by Turkey.

    Renewed violence broke out in Gaza on Tuesday, with five Palestinians reportedly killed by Israeli fire.

    Two Palestinian gunmen were shot dead after crossing the border in the south of the territory, a military spokesman said.

    Three more people died in an Israeli strike in the north of Gaza, according to Gaza's emergency services. Israel said it carried out an air strike after two rockets were fired from Gaza.

    Following the Israeli sea-born raid, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak ordered the border crossing between Egypt and the Gaza Strip to be opened.

    The Rafah crossing has been closed since 2007, although special medical cases are occasionally allowed through.

    The Egyptian state news agency said the latest opening was to allow humanitarian aid through. It is not clear how long it will be kept open.

    The UN Security Council issued a statement after deliberating through the night.

    It said an investigation should be "prompt, impartial, credible and transparent". It also condemned the "acts" which led to the deaths.

    Barbara Plett, the BBC's UN correspondent in New York, said the statement was the result of a compromise between Turkey and the US, Israel's closest ally.

    In its defence, Israel released footage showing soldiers landing on the Turkish ship and being apparently attacked.

    Captain Aria Shaliker of the Israel Defense Forces, who was part of Monday's operation, says the commandos began the raids armed with paint ball guns.

    "I was, myself, on one of the boats, the Israeli boats, approaching the flotilla," he told the BBC's World Today programme.

    "It is true that the Israeli commander unit... came on board with paint ball weapons... in order to disperse [people] if there was violence. They were ready for a violent... demonstration on board the flotilla, especially on the big boat, the Marmara.

    "No-one really expected that there would be such a violent outcome of what happened.

    "First, you know, the soldiers tried to disperse, but in the end when they were shot at, you know when there was shooting... from the other side, there's no other way than turning from paint ball to live ammunition."

    The Israeli government has accused the activists of links to Islamist groups.

    Video has emerged showing some on board the aid ship shouting anti-Jewish and radical Islamist slogans as they prepared to sail to Gaza last Friday.

    The pictures, from Arabic TV, showed the campaigners in a jubilant mood. One said she was determined either to get to Gaza or to die a martyr.

    Of the 679 activists brought to the Israeli port of Ashdod, only 50 agreed to be voluntarily deported and more than 30 are being treated in hospital for their injuries, reports the BBC's Wyre Davies in Jerusalem.

    That means that almost 600 people, from several countries, are still being held in detention centres across Israel and being questioned by the authorities.

    LEGALITY OF CONVOY RAID
    * The UN Charter on the Law of the Sea says only if a vessel is suspected to be transporting weapons, or weapons of mass destruction, can it be boarded in international waters. Otherwise the permission of the ship's flag carrying nation must be sought.
    * The charter allows for naval blockades, but the effect of the blockade on civilians must be proportionate to the effect on the military element for the blockade to be legally enforceable.
    * A ship trying to breach a blockade can be boarded and force may be used to stop it as long as it is "necessary and proportionate".
    * The Israeli Defense Forces say soldiers acted in self-defence.
    * An investigation, either by the UN or by the ship's flag-carrier Turkey, is required to find if the use of force was proportionate to a claim of self defence.
     
  4. Hi i'm God

    Hi i'm God TRIBE Member

    Interestingly enough (or not) Pro-Israel groups say the opposite.

     
  5. acheron

    acheron TRIBE Member

    I love the "firebomb" thrown at the Israeli soldiers - that's a thermal video we're watching and it doesn't glow or splash bright white when it lands. And that first soldier who falls to the deck from his fastrope? He's probably a noob soldier who forgot his gloves.
     
  6. Bass-Invader

    Bass-Invader TRIBE Member

  7. rentboy

    rentboy TRIBE Member

    ^^

    haha.
     
  8. acheron

    acheron TRIBE Member

    Israeli Knesset member rejects navy account of attack
    Birmingham Star
    Wednesday 2nd June, 2010
    Israeli Knesset member rejects navy account of attack

    An Arab member of the Israeli parliament who was on board the international flotilla that was attacked on Monday as it tried to take humanitarian aid to Gaza has accused Israel of intending to kill peace activists as a way to deter future convoys.

    Haneen Zoubi said Israeli naval vessels had surrounded the flotilla’s flagship, the Mavi Marmara, and fired on it a few minutes before commandos abseiled from a helicopter directly above them.

    Terrified passengers had been forced off the deck when water was sprayed at them. She said she was not aware of any provocation or resistance by the passengers, who were all unarmed.

    She added that within minutes of the raid beginning, three bodies had been brought to the main room on the upper deck in which she and most other passengers were confined. Two had gunshot wounds to the head, in what she suggested had been executions.

    Two other passengers slowly bled to death in the room after Israeli soldiers ignored messages in Hebrew she had held up at the window calling for medical help to save them. She said she saw seven other passengers seriously wounded.

    “Israel had days to plan this military operation,” she told a press conference in Nazareth. “They wanted many deaths to terrorise us and to send a message that no future aid convoys should try to break the siege of Gaza.”

    Released Tuesday by police, apparently because of her parliamentary immunity, she said she was speaking out while most of the hundreds of other peace activists were either being held by Israel for deportation or were under arrest.

    Three other leaders of Israel’s large Palestinian Arab minority, including Sheikh Raed Salah, a spiritual leader, were arrested as their ships docked in the southern port of Ashdod. Lawyers said that under Israeli law they could be held and questioned for up to 30 days without being charged.

    Contradicting Israeli claims, Ms Zoubi said a search by the soldiers after they took control of the Marmara discovered no arms or other weapons.

    It was vital, she added, that the world demand an independent UN inquiry to find out what had happened on the ship rather than allow Israel to carry out a “whitewash” with its own military investigation.

    Ms Zoubi spoke as Palestinians inside both Israel and the occupied territories observed a general strike called by their leaders.

    A statement from the High Follow-Up Committee, the main political body for Israel’s Palestinian citizens, described the raid on the flotilla as “state-sponsored terrorism”.

    Demonstrations and marches in most of the main Palestinian towns and villages in Israel passed off quietly. Local analysts described the mood as angry but subdued, not least because of the openly hostile climate that has developed towards Palestinian citizens since crackdowns on their protests during the Israeli attack on Gaza 18 months ago.

    However, police were reported to have been put on high alert, with thousands of extra officers drafted into the north, where most Palestinian citizens live.

    On Monday, clashes between protesters and police broke out close to the al Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem’s Old City and in the northern town of Umm al Fahm after false rumours circulated that Sheikh Salah, the leader of Israel’s main Islamic Movement, had been killed in the Israeli naval operation.

    Police were reported to have arrested 18 youths, mainly for throwing stones in various locations in the north.

    Scores of Palestinians demonstrated outside the Turkish consulate in East Jerusalem Tuesday to show their support for Ankara, which has harshly criticised Israeli actions. Two demonstrators were reported to have been arrested by police.

    In the West Bank, many Palestinians observed the first of three days of mourning decreed by Mahmoud Abbas, the Palestinian president, over the killings of international activists.

    Even before the attack on the flotilla, the country’s Palestinian minority, a fifth of the population, had been braced for a backlash from the government and Jewish public for its leaders’ participation in the flotilla. As the ships set sail, Ynet, Israel’s most popular news website, had asked whether Ms Zoubi was an “MP in the service of Hamas”.

    But faced with the severe diplomatic fall-out from Israel’s killing of peace activists, Israel’s Palestinian leaders warned that they were likely to come under even fiercer criticism in coming days.

    Tuesday right-wing parties launched their first attacks on Ms Zoubi, demanding the revocation of her immunity and her expulsion from the parliament. Danny Danon, a member of the prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s Likud party, called for her to be “tried for treason”.

    In her statement on the attack, Ms Zoubi said that at 4am on Monday she had seen at least 14 Israeli boats surround their ship 130km out at sea, in international waters.

    She said the passengers had been gripped with fear at the noise and confusion as the commandos abseiled on to the deck. “I did not believe we were going to survive more than five minutes,” she said.

    Taleb al Sana, another Arab MP, supported Ms Zoubi’s contention that Israeli claims that the commandos shot only at the passengers’ legs were false. “I have visited the wounded in hospital and they all have shot wounds to the head and body,” he said.

    Adalah, a legal centre for Israel’s Arab minority, said nine lawyers had been given limited access Tuesday afternoon to the hundreds of activists detained in Beersheva and were trying to take testimonies “in very difficult circumstances”.

    Its lawyers and human rights groups were also trying to track down who had been injured and where they being treated.

    “Our view is that Israel is intentionally trying to obstruct this work and is enforcing an information blackout,” said Gaby Rubin, a spokeswoman for Adalah.
     
  9. praktik

    praktik TRIBE Member

    Great time to have added Al Jazeera to my programming lineup..;)
     
  10. alexd

    alexd Administrator Staff Member

    Israel Sends Mixed Messages on Inquiry
    By ISABEL KERSHNER NYT

    JERUSALEM — Israel’s ambassador to Washington said Sunday that his country would reject an international inquiry into last week’s deadly raid on a Turkish ship, but there was still no formal announcement from Jerusalem on the matter.

    “We are rejecting the idea of an international commission,” Michael B. Oren, the ambassador, told Fox News Sunday. “We are discussing with the Obama administration the way in which our inquiry will take place.”

    He added, “At the end of the day, Israel has the right, the duty, as a democracy to investigate any military activity.”

    The remarks came after the United Nations secretary general, Ban Ki-moon, conveyed a proposal to Israel for an international panel to investigate the raid on the ship, which was trying to breach Israel’s naval blockade of Gaza.

    The Israeli commando operation, which took place in international waters last Monday, left nine Turkish activists dead, stirring international outrage. Israel said that its soldiers opened fire only as a last resort after they encountered fierce resistance on the Turkish ship.

    It was not immediately clear whether Mr. Oren was referring specifically to Mr. Ban’s proposal, and there was confusion in Israel over what the government’s position was.

    Earlier Sunday, Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, told a meeting of his Likud Party ministers that no agreement had been reached with Mr. Ban and suggested that he was keeping his options open.

    “I told the United Nations secretary general that an investigation of the facts has to be carried out responsibly and objectively,” Mr. Netanyahu said, according to an official who was in the room. “I am looking into other possibilities.”

    Even after Mr. Oren’s comments, the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly, insisted that Israel’s response to Mr. Ban had not been completed, and that the prime minister wanted to “decide things calmly, and not under the pressure of events.”

    The government was also discussing the possibility of foreign participation in an Israeli investigation. Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman said he would not be opposed to including a foreign observer or observers in an Israeli-led inquiry, according to his media adviser, Tzachi Moshe.

    “He thinks we have nothing to hide,” Mr. Moshe said.

    In a statement adopted unanimously last week, the United Nations Security Council called for a prompt, credible and impartial investigation into the raid. Israel is also under intense pressure to lift or significantly ease the blockade of the Hamas-run Palestinian enclave.

    Mr. Ban spoke by telephone over the weekend with Mr. Netanyahu, and Mr. Netanyahu was set to convene his top ministers on Sunday night to discuss the investigation and Israeli policy toward Gaza, officials here said.

    Mr. Ban proposed a panel that would include representatives from Turkey, Israel and two or three other countries, diplomats have said.

    It has been suggested that Sir Geoffrey Palmer, a former prime minister of New Zealand, would lead the panel. Sir Geoffrey is New Zealand’s commissioner to the International Whaling Commission and an expert on maritime law.

    Israel has balked at the notion of an international investigation, saying that it is being singled out for special treatment, and that it carries out its own investigations of such military operations.

    Still, faced with international fury, Israel appears to be trying to show some flexibility, and some ministers have floated ideas for changing the blockade policy.

    Mr. Netanyahu argues that the naval blockade is essential to prevent the smuggling of weapons into Gaza by Hamas, which is sworn to Israel’s destruction.

    But, he said Sunday: “We have no desire to make things difficult for the civilian population in Gaza. We would like for goods that are neither war matériel nor contraband to enter Gaza.”

    Mr. Lieberman has suggested opening the land crossings to Gaza in return for regular Red Cross visits to Staff Sgt. Gilad Shalit, the Israeli soldier captured by Hamas and other militant groups in a cross-border raid in 2006. Sergeant Shalit has not been allowed any visits so far.

    Similarly, ideas have been raised for some kind of international mechanism for the inspections of boats.

    Israeli officials confirmed that discussions on these matters were taking place between Israel and the White House.

    “We are not indifferent to the criticism,” Isaac Herzog, a government minister from the Labor Party, said Sunday in a telephone interview. “Out of this crisis may stem a new situation, a package.”

    He said such a package could include an increased flow of civilian goods to Gaza, visits to Sergeant Shalit and the blocking of arms to Hamas.

    At the start of the weekly cabinet meeting on Sunday, Mr. Netanyahu said Israel had information that the “dozens of thugs” armed with iron bars, clubs and knives who clashed with Israeli soldiers on the Turkish ship were a distinct group not associated with the hundreds of other passengers on board.

    He said the group “boarded the boat separately, in a different city, organized separately, equipped itself separately and went on deck under different procedures.”

    Huwaida Arraf, a leader of the Free Gaza Movement, which organized the flotilla, called Mr. Netanyahu’s assertions “another pack of lies,” The Associated Press reported. She said that all the passengers were screened for weapons, and that the group’s partners in the mission had agreed not to bring weapons on board.
     
  11. Hipsterave

    Hipsterave TRIBE Promoter

    [Youtube]c88HRYsvwCA[/Youtube]
     
  12. kyfe

    kyfe TRIBE Member

    i'd love to see his bank account after making those remarks, he's a cheerleader do you need proof? he's been spewing this shit for more than a year. also what does a video from 2009 have anything to do with Israelis attack on an aid ship?

    [YOUTUBE]WssrKJ3Iqcw[/YOUTUBE]
     
  13. tobywan

    tobywan TRIBE Member

    Saw a little tidbit that Iran is interested in putting their Revolutionary Guards on AID ships to act as security. Also a good chance that this will escalate over the next few weeks/months, to the point that dozens of ships could sail there together and take on the blockade.
     
  14. toney

    toney TRIBE Member

    What. She. Said.

    [​IMG]
     

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