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ipad. what's the point?

What will the new Apple tablet be called?

  • ipad

    Votes: 9 47.4%
  • itablet

    Votes: 1 5.3%
  • islate

    Votes: 6 31.6%
  • ibook

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • isomething else

    Votes: 4 21.1%

  • Total voters
    19

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
Well it looks like Apple will launch their ipad or islate or a new version of macpaint on the 27th (as one should deduce from the launch invite):



What's the point with tablet PCs? They are bigger than phones so you can't easily carry them, and maybe a little smaller than the smallest notebooks but not by much (and with less functionality) so if you are already carrying one of those, are you going to now carry around 3 devices - or just mothball the notebook just to pick up another device with sort of the same functionality.....

There doesn't seem to be a niche for these except perhaps technology reviewers...
 

acheron

TRIBE Member
I can see this thing being awesome for basically controlling one's life from your easy chair. At least, that's how I plan on using it. I expect to be able to use it with remote access to dial into my main PC, stream files to my television, read emails, magazines, newspapers, etc... this thing will kill the kindle-style e-readers right out of the gate. Bet that Apple is working on their own online book and magazine store/subscription service. They've been making links with media companies for the past year or two ahead of this. There's a whole lot of potential here as a media center/home commander kind of deal.
 

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
They've been making links with media companies for the past year or two ahead of this. There's a whole lot of potential here as a media center/home commander kind of deal.
I am surprised they have been able to keep this secret... You wuld think there would be chinese clone knockoffs of the product readily available already, or at least some phone cam snapshots of it from the factory floor...
 

Kalemic

TRIBE Promoter
I am surprised they have been able to keep this secret... You wuld think there would be chinese clone knockoffs of the product readily available already, or at least some phone cam snapshots of it from the factory floor...
I read an article about the internal security group at Apple once. If there is a leak from a department the lock down sounds insane.
 

videotronic

TRIBE Member
there was a famous story back when the iphone launched in the US that the hardware and software teams working on it were kept totally independent of one another..all the test units to debug the software were apparently square, sealed boxes
 

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
I read an article about the internal security group at Apple once. If there is a leak from a department the lock down sounds insane.
Maybe they have the Chinese assemble them with blindfolds on, in darkened factories, naked (so there are no cameras or cell phones).
 

Kalemic

TRIBE Promoter
Found it.

Apple Gestapo: How Apple Hunts Down Leaks

They call themselves the Worldwide Loyalty Team. Among some employees, they are known as the Apple Gestapo, a group of moles always spying in headquarters and stores, reporting directly to Jobs and Oppenheimer. Here's how they hunt people down.

"You may want to know about their Worldwide Loyalty Team," Tom told me recently in an email. I read what he had to say. It felt like a description of the Gestapo, without the torture and killing part.

Tom never lived in Nazi Germany, back in the time when the Geheime Staatspolize had the power to get into any house or any office, at any time of the day or night, without any warrant or reason, to seize whatever or whoever they wanted in their never ending search to find enemies of the state. A place in which you had no right to privacy whatsoever. A place in which you were guilty until proven otherwise.

No, Tom never lived in Nazi Germany, nor in East Germany, nor in the Soviet Union, nor in Communist China. He lives in the United States. For sure, he has never been scared of losing his life nor the ones he loves, like thousands of millions in those countries. But he knows how it feels to be watched, to always be considered guilty of crimes against another kind of state. He knew how it felt to have no privacy whatsoever when he was working right here, in a little Californian town called Cupertino, in a legendary place located in One Infinite Loop.

Tom knew about all that pretty well, back when he was working at Apple Inc.

Operation Lockdown
Of course, if Tom had never sent any sensitive information to media outlets, he would have never had the fear of being caught, only to get fired and sued into oblivion by Apple Legal. But the lack of any privacy whatsoever is something that he shared with all his fellow employees.

"Apple has these moles working everywhere, especially in departments where leaks are suspected. Management is not aware of them," he told me, "once they suspect a leak, the special forces—as we call them—will walk in the office at any hour, especially in the mornings. They will contact whoever was the most senior manager in the building, and ask them to coordinate the operation."

The operation, as Tom calls it, is not anything special. It is not one of a kind event. It's just a normal practice, and the process is pretty simple: The manager will instruct all employees to stay at their desks, telling them what to do and what to expect at any given time. The Apple Gestapo never handles the communication. They are there, present, supervising the supervisors, making sure everything goes as planned.

All cellphones are then taken. Usually, they collect them all at the same time, which means that the process could take a long time. If you need to contact the exterior during the time your cellphone is under examination, you will have to ask for permission, and your call will be monitored.

They don't ask for cameras because there are no cameras at Apple: Employees are not allowed to get into the campus with them. If the cellphone is an iPhone, it gets backed up onto a laptop. "In fact, at the beginning they used to say that the iPhones were really their property, since Apple gave every employee a free iPhone," he points out. All the employees are asked to unlock and disable any locking features in their cellphones, and then the special forces will proceed to check them for recent activity.

They back up everything and go through all the other phones' text messages and pictures. If you have porn in your phone, they will see it. If you have text messages to your spouse, lover, or Tiger Woods, they will see them, too. Just like that. No privacy, no limits.

While all this is happening, the employees are ordered to activate the screensaver on their computers, so the special forces are sure there are no chats happening between employees or with the exterior. They are told not to speak, text or call one other when the lockdown is happening: "It is like a gag order, and if the employee does not want to participate, they are basically asked to leave and never come back."

2009 Is Like "1984"
Of course, all this is voluntary. Management recommends that you relinquish your phones. If you don't do it they will fire you, or they will investigate why you didn't want to give them your cellphone. Simultaneously, everyone is asked to sign NDA's during the investigations, even though they already signed Apple NDAs to work there.

"I was at several events. When they find what they are looking for—which they usually do—the person is asked to stay until the end of the business day. Then he is asked to leave the premises quietly, escorted by security," Tom says. While he's there, the special forces hang around, watching. "There is a lot that goes behind doors that I don't really know about. I do know, however, that they really interrogate people that are serious suspects, intimidating them by threatening to sue."

There is no way to know how often this happens, however, as everything is handled very quietly. The same Worldwide Loyalty Team does many other things to keep everyone in check, from searching out the email history of every employee—which is also a normal practice in other corporations and government agencies—to seeding fake images to catch potential leaks and diffuse the hype about some product introductions.

As Tom was describing all this, my mind was getting back to all I've read about Steve Jobs and Apple, back when he was El Capitán of the brave group of free pirates who created the Macintosh. The Mac was a secret project too, but there was no secret police making sure there were no leaks. After a hard day of work, all the Mac team sometimes played on the beaches of California, careless and happy, confident that this new revolutionary computer would change the world, one desktop at a time. All of them shared information, there were no seeeecrets, and that's why they came up with an "insanely great" computer, as Steve Jobs himself used to refer to it.

And while I understand that secrecy is paramount to success in today's extremely competitive market—hello, dear marketdrones—now I look at this story on the Worldwide Loyalty Team, and it makes me realize how much Apple has changed. From a happy hippie company, to a company that does KGB-style lockdowns and Gestapo interrogations that end in suicides.

I wonder if the special forces have ever chased anyone through the Infinite Loop campus, dressed in their full regalia:
Source: http://gizmodo.com/5427058/apple-gestapo-how-apple-hunts-down-leaks?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+gizmodo/full+(Gizmodo)&utm_content=Google+Reader
 

tripleup

TRIBE Member
I can see this thing being awesome for basically controlling one's life from your easy chair. At least, that's how I plan on using it. I expect to be able to use it with remote access to dial into my main PC, stream files to my television, read emails, magazines, newspapers, etc... this thing will kill the kindle-style e-readers right out of the gate. Bet that Apple is working on their own online book and magazine store/subscription service. They've been making links with media companies for the past year or two ahead of this. There's a whole lot of potential here as a media center/home commander kind of deal.
So everything I currently do through my laptop?
 

Jam

TRIBE Member
I can see this thing being awesome for basically controlling one's life from your easy chair. At least, that's how I plan on using it. I expect to be able to use it with remote access to dial into my main PC, stream files to my television, read emails, magazines, newspapers, etc... this thing will kill the kindle-style e-readers right out of the gate. Bet that Apple is working on their own online book and magazine store/subscription service. They've been making links with media companies for the past year or two ahead of this. There's a whole lot of potential here as a media center/home commander kind of deal.
I thought the major advantage the kindle style E-readers had over a computer screen was the E-ink that doesn't refresh and strain your eyes...

How will reading a book on a tablet PC be different than reading from a laptop screen now?
 

CiG

TRIBE Member
At my work we use them to mark up drawings/documents. Much easier then printing, marking up with a marker, scanning, etc.

In the home? Not sure.
 

diablo

TRIBE Member
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Dark-Rave

TRIBE Member
anyone tried dj'ing with a tablet or touch screen laptop?

i had been toying with the idea of using a tablet or a laptop with touchscreen but havent gotten around to actually trying it. anyone?

p
 

RumRogerz

TRIBE Member
this is a great thing for the computer world. Computers will end up being just like the apple tablet in the next decade anyhow - this is just an essential stepping stone towards consumer based tech evolution.

Think how handy this tablet will be around the house. People have here have already mentioned it - sitting back in my lazy chair, reading the news, streaming movies, checkin mah emails - i can only imagine the games becoming far more embracing due to the larger screen and better resolution.

I'm personally gonna wait it out till the 2nd generation goes on the shelves. 1st generation anything has a plethora of bugs they still have to iron out and the processor speeds always jump significantly after 5 or 6 months.
 

deevah

TRIBE Member
I can see this thing being awesome for basically controlling one's life from your easy chair. At least, that's how I plan on using it. I expect to be able to use it with remote access to dial into my main PC, stream files to my television, read emails, magazines, newspapers, etc... this thing will kill the kindle-style e-readers right out of the gate. Bet that Apple is working on their own online book and magazine store/subscription service. They've been making links with media companies for the past year or two ahead of this. There's a whole lot of potential here as a media center/home commander kind of deal.

bingo
 

Dialog

TRIBE Member
ahhh, just reminiscing about the Apple Newton.... Maybe it'll have an optional keyboard you can buy for $$$!


My old friend Grant in Calgary was and still is the hugest Newton superfreak. Not only does he appear to own the above "Cadillac" prototype, but he also has a prototype Kanji Newton 2000; just the touchscreen and motherboard mounted between two slabs of lexan, and it was some kind of functional. Not that either one of us could read what it was spitting out.

Let's also not forget one of the other fruits of the Newton's development; Apple's founding investment in ARM. Dividends from it kept Apple afloat during the tough times of 96-8, and some pundits are saying in a few years ARM designs could be giving x86/Atom a serious run for it's money.
 
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