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'Idol' knockoff to bump Mansbridge

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
'Idol' knockoff to bump Mansbridge

GAYLE MACDONALD
With a report from Unnati Gandhi

Veteran news anchor Peter Mansbridge and The National will be bumped from their 10 p.m. time slot this summer to make way for an American Idol knockoff reality series, The One: Making a Music Star.

CBC has confirmed it is moving its flagship national newscast back to 11 p.m. to make way for the flashy American import, produced by Endemol USA, which will make its two-hour debut July 18 and run through Sept. 6.

The change has raised the ire of Mr. Mansbridge, anchor of The National for 18 years, who said the newscast went through months of being delayed this year -- first for the Olympics, then for hockey.

"I always object to that and make my voice heard on that and sometimes they listen to me, and other times they don't," he said.

ABC's new 16-part reality show, which will be simulcast on CBC, will air Tuesday nights from 9:30 to 11 p.m. EST, as well as on Wednesdays from 8 to 9 p.m.

CBC spokesman Jeff Keay said The National will definitely be bumped Tuesdays in Central Canada, but may not be affected in other parts of Canada.

"We're very excited about this program," Mr. Keay said. "We think it's got terrific potential.

"We recognize some people may be uncomfortable with it. We recognize that," he said. "We are trying to accommodate everyone's needs. In a perfect world we wouldn't need to move things around, but given the strengths of the new program, we thought it was applicable under the circumstances."

This fall, CBC plans to make a local version of The One, the musical-talent contest show that has also been a hit in other territories. Similar to the Idol franchise, with contestants performing their hearts out and vying for the top prize of a recording contract, The One is different in that contestants will get vocal coaching and tutoring by celebrity mentors.

Mr. Mansbridge said in an interview that while moving The National upsets him, "I also see the possibility of it helping us in the long run. Because if the Canadian version is a success in the fall, then it can precede us, and it can deliver an audience to The National."

Arthur Lewis, executive director of Our Public Airwaves, said the decision to bump The National for a reality show is "sad testimony of the extent to which CBC Television has become a commercial network.

"The very fact that they're running an American program, simulcast with ABC, is appalling," Mr. Lewis said. "The CBC has got to find a way to wean itself off this incredible dependence on commercial sales in order to pay its bills."

In October, 2005, CBC president Robert Rabinovitch told the House of Commons Heritage Committee that "there are certain types of programming that we don't have to do or should do. For example, we don't do reality television.

"We think we're enough of a reality on our own, in terms of surviving. But we do not do reality programming. If we only were chasing rating points, we could do reality programming," he said, in response to a question from Bev Oda, then Conservative Party heritage critic. "Quite frankly, some public broadcasters in the world do reality programming. But we don't do that."

At CBC's fall 2006 launch last week, the network also unveiled two more reality shows, Dragon's Den, as well as a game show, Test the Nation: National IQ Test.

Ian Morrison, spokesman for Friends of Canadian Broadcasting, said the schedule change for The National "proves that hockey is not the only thing that the current management of CBC thinks is more important than the news. We've noticed during the period Mr. Rabinovitch has been president a decline in Canadian content that's available in prime time.

"It's a steady erosion and . . . reflects the values of the current management."

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20060621.MANSBRIDGE21/TPStory/TPNational/Music/

For real. Let's keep our priorities straight!
 

noodle

TRIBE Member
Good old CBC! Always 5 years behind the times in terms of television.

I find this pretty funny considering CBC passed on Canadian Idol back when it was being shopped around. They claimed the franchise wasn't distinctly canadian enough. Now they're going with endemol (who also produce fear factor) to do this.
 

Vincent Vega

TRIBE Member
Boss Hog said:
'Idol' knockoff to bump Mansbridge

In October, 2005, CBC president Robert Rabinovitch told the House of Commons Heritage Committee that.....we don't do reality television.

....But we do not do reality programming. If we only were chasing rating points, we could do reality programming," he said, in response to a question from Bev Oda, then Conservative Party heritage critic. "Quite frankly, some public broadcasters in the world do reality programming. But we don't do that."

Now where's that foot-in-mouth thread when we need it.....
 
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noodle

TRIBE Member
The only good I see in this is (besides increased ad revenue) is that CBC will be able reach a larger audience to promote their other shows within the broadcast of this one because of the simulcast (people won't instinctually go to CBC for this kind of program, they'll still go to ABC).

Now they just have to go out and make better shows!!!!
 

Chris

Well-Known TRIBEr
Peter Mansbridge is the &#$%$*@( PIMP of the CBC!
2003_PeterMansbridge.jpg
 
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Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
TaCk OnE? said:
who is this "our" you're referring to?


You know how kindergarten teachers talk to people even when they're outside of class?

"Well now, we don't want to hurt others when we play, do we?"

Sort of like that.

And isn't it great that CBC is going to shit? Perfect excuse to cut its funding!
 

Sunshyne Jones

TRIBE Member
I'm not onside with CBC's decision making, haven't been for a while now ... just posting this presser from CBC I received in my inbox today ...

CBC Television values the national and all its CBC news programming


TORONTO, June 23 /CNW/ -

A letter from Richard Stursberg
Executive Vice-President
CBC Television

Much has been made over the past three days of the CBC's decision to
temporarily pre-empt The National newscast for eight Tuesdays to make room for a U.S.-based simulcast of the music reality program The One. The attention our announcement attracted was further amplified by the just-released Senate report on media concentration. I'd like to shed some light on our decision and paint a broader picture of the financial realities of public broadcasting in this country.

First, it is important to note that CBC Television's prime time schedule
is overwhelmingly Canadian. From 7 p.m. to midnight, almost every night, our
schedule consists of Canadian comedies, dramas, documentaries, news, current affairs and sports. No private broadcaster can make the same claim. In fact, their prime time schedules are dominated by American programming.

The decision to add the U.S. simulcast of The One to our summer schedule
will help build a platform for the Canadian version of the program that we
will be airing in the fall. The show has already enjoyed incredible success in
Québec, as Star Academie, and we felt that an English Canadian version would be an excellent vehicle for showcasing new Canadian talent. By simulcasting the U.S. version this summer we will also generate some much-needed revenue for the CBC at a time of the year when the viewing of Canadian news and programming falls off.

I would also like to point out that, despite the hue and cry, this is a
case of much ado about little. Canadians are not being denied access to The
National. For viewers in Ontario and points east, it will be moved out of its
regular time slot on just eight Tuesday nights this summer. For audiences west of Ontario, viewing is not affected at all. Canadians will still be able to
watch The National at its regularly scheduled times (9 & 10 p.m.) on
Newsworld, Canada's number one news network, and at 11 pm on the main CBC network.

Ultimately, the decision to air the U.S. simulcast of The One, and its
Canadian offshoot, was borne of a strategy to fulfill the difficult, but not
impossible, goal we have set for the network: to make CBC Television the most important and popular video platform for Canadian News, Current Affairs, Kids, and Entertainment programming.

The greatest cultural challenge English Canada faces is providing
Canadians with homegrown programming that they actually want to watch. We are the only country in the industrialized world where its citizens prefer to
watch another country's programming. Only the CBC can help to resolve this
considerable cultural issue because only the CBC has the shelf space in its
schedule to make Canadian programming available in deep prime time when the greatest number of Canadians are watching television. Private broadcasters cannot do this because their business model requires that they show U.S. programming in prime time. If they do not they cannot sustain their
businesses.

The question is how are we going to pay for the CBC? There has been much
well-intentioned discussion this week of CBC Television getting out of
advertising and not competing with the private broadcasters for sports or
other properties. But the simple fact is that without commercial revenues to
complement its parliamentary appropriation, the CBC cannot survive.

To suggest, as some have this week, that the government replace the money
we would lose by getting out of advertising is unlikely given the experience
of the last 30 years during which time CBC/Radio-Canada has not had a
permanent increase to its base operating funding beyond the standard salary
increases. In real dollar terms the value of our parliamentary appropriation
has declined by close to $400 million dollars in the last 15 years.

How does that compare to the manner in which other countries fund their
public broadcasters? Of the G7 nations, Canada offers the lowest level of
public support to its public broadcaster than any other nation other than the
U.S. A recent study of public broadcasting systems around the world shows that next to the U.S. and New Zealand, Canada spends the least amount of money per capita on its national public broadcaster. Italy, Spain, Germany, the UK, France, Finland and others are all ahead of us in terms of spending. In the UK, where they are hardly under the cultural pressure from the U.S. that Canada is, the BBC is funded to the tune of more than $120 Canadian per
capita. France, Germany and Italy, all of which have intensely vibrant
national cultures, spend an average of $81 per capita on public broadcasting.
Canada, on the other hand, provides roughly $32 per capita in funding to
CBC/Radio-Canada as a whole - that's for 27 platforms, including a range of
television, radio and online services in French and English, and eight
aboriginal languages in the North.

In terms of how it is financed, this means that CBC Television must
unfortunately rely on private sources of revenue in order to support its
Canadian schedule. In fact, more than 50% of our revenues are commercially
derived - from advertising, program sales, etc. To put it more concretely, of
the more than $580 million budget for CBC Television (including Newsworld),
less than $275 million comes from the corporation's parliamentary
appropriation.

Relying on commercial revenues means that audiences are doubly important.
Above and beyond the simple fact that as a public broadcaster we should offer programming that appeals to the greatest number of Canadians, all of whom are paying for the CBC, losing audience also means that we have less money to make programs. For instance, every audience share point that CBC Television loses is worth approximately $25 million in revenue.

So when we lose ground we lose the means to produce or procure Canadian
shows. We're forced to cut back our activity and even cancel shows. If,
however, we're able to grow our audiences, the extra revenue gets put right
back onto the screen as more Canadian programming.

In closing, I would like to reiterate that we are trying to build the
best, most successful broadcaster of entertaining, informative and
enlightening programming by, for and about Canadians. This is an enormous
challenge. If we can achieve this we will have helped to resolve a significant
cultural issue. Like every self-respecting country in the world we'll have
made shows we ourselves will want to watch in large numbers.

Richard Stursberg

-30-

/For further information: Jay Walsh, CBC Communications, (416) 205-6506/
 

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
Sunshyne Jones said:
Canadians will still be able to
watch The National at its regularly scheduled times (9 & 10 p.m.) on
Newsworld, Canada's number one news network, and at 11 pm on the main CBC network.


So... so much for a reasonable time slot for those in Eastern Canada.
 
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Stormshadow

TRIBE Member
A senate standing commitee, headed by the former editor of the Montreal Gazette has reccomended that CBC get their priorities back on track and recalibrate themselves as a public broadcaster that fills niches that private broadcasters can't and won't fill.

While I'm not so sure the network needs to abandon its pseudo-commercial model bumping the National for a reality show just doesn't make sense.
 

noodle

TRIBE Member
The more I think about it, the more I realize US shows on CBC primetime isn't necessarily a bad thing. Like it or not, it's a necessity for broadcasters in this day and age. More money from advertisers = more money to spend on CanCon (there are even regulations in place to ensure this happens, especially for the CBC). CBC and Canadian productions in general for that matter need all the help they can get.

The fact that they bumped the National competely boggles my mind though.

I'm all for risk taking, but this was a very poorly thought out strategy.
 

Chris

Well-Known TRIBEr
Stormshadow said:
A senate standing commitee, headed by the former editor of the Montreal Gazette has reccomended that CBC get their priorities back on track and recalibrate themselves as a public broadcaster that fills niches that private broadcasters can't and won't fill.

While I'm not so sure the network needs to abandon its pseudo-commercial model bumping the National for a reality show just doesn't make sense.
also said they need more funding beyond the $1B they currently recieve. There is no way I could support that in order to get back to a traditional public broadcaster.

I love thee CBC, and its current format, I think its a happy medium.
 

Booty Bits

TRIBE Member
their argument is also that they will be heavily advertising their canadian content during the commercials when they are airing The One, which will give them a chance to grab new audiences for their canadian programming as well.
 

noodle

TRIBE Member
Sometimes I think they should just ditch the cash hemorrhaging television division and focus on what they do well: web and radio.
 
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noodle

TRIBE Member
You are one of the few unfortunately.

With in the next 10-20 years a HUGE chunk of CBC television's audience will be dead.
 

noodle

TRIBE Member
What I should have said is one of the few who is under 55.

Old people make up a pretty sizable percentage of CBC's audience and well, old people die.

One of CBC's televisions main priorities right now is capturing a younger audience.
 
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