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"I ain't into faggots," 50 says

mondo

TRIBE Promoter
...think about this in his perspective and why he is allowed to say it and how it would be beneficial to say it. I personally can't understand how Interscope would even allow that interview to be published. I remember Marky Mark was in hot water about the same topic w/ Shabba Ranks. Or is controversy the way it goes with gangsta rappers to stay in the news?





www.mtv.com
www.playboy.com

In a wide-ranging interview with Playboy magazine, 50 Cent has let his feelings on homosexuality be known, in language sure to draw the ire of gay-rights supporters.

"I ain't into f----ts," 50 says in an interview in the April issue of Playboy, which hits stands Friday. "I don't like gay people around me, because I'm not comfortable with what their thoughts are. I'm not prejudiced. I just don't go with gay people and kick it — we don't have that much in common. I'd rather hang out with a straight dude. But women who like women, that's cool."

50's statements follow in the footsteps of remarks made by two other stars in his rap family, Eminem and Dr. Dre, who have each run afoul of gay-rights and civil-liberties groups with past anti-homosexual comments.

50 Cent's comments came while admitting that his mother was bisexual. Later, he unapologetically explains his words, saying, "It's OK to write that I'm prejudiced. This is as honest as I could possibly be with you. When people become celebrities they change the way they speak. But my conversation with you is exactly the way I would have a conversation on the street. We refer to gay people as f----ts, as h--os. It could be disrespectful, but that's the facts."

Elsewhere in the interview, 50 recalls the first time he ever shot someone, discusses his own experiences with getting shot and says he wants to build a community center for children.

A spokesperson for 50 Cent had no comment on the story.

Meanwhile, on Tuesday night, talk show host Bill O' Reilly followed up his critique of Ludacris by blasting 50 Cent and the companies, like Reebok, that do business with the rapper. On his show, "The O'Reilly Factor," the talking head said 50 was a "horrible influence on children" and that Reebok is "embracing a guy who's hurting children." Last year, Reebok signed an endorsement deal with 50 Cent to develop a line of casual sneakers (see "50 Cent Can Now Throw Out His S. Carters").


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Littlest Hobo

TRIBE Member
Ah hip-hop culture, so enlightening. Mind you, he probably loves chicks getting it one, so he's an hypocrite. Hardly suprising, one does not look to rappers for progressive thinking. Most of the rappers have been to prison and probably got head from dudes anyways. If I were an interviewer I'd ask that question!
 

Adam

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by mondo
"I don't like gay people around me, because I'm not comfortable with what their thoughts are.

Here's one thought: You're an ugly, no-talent, one-hit-wonder hack.
 
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2canplay

TRIBE Member
I think its just Politically Incorrect, not political. This would be a popular post in the General or Hip-Hop room.

About 50 though....two years, he'll be flipping burgers at Denny's.
 
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Jazz

TRIBE Member
US police put hip-hop under surveillance

Hotels staked out and lyrics scrutinised in battle to stop rap's violence

Gary Younge in New York
Thursday March 11, 2004
The Guardian

In the money, and under surveillance: 50 Cent

The Miami and Miami Beach police have a black ring-binder six inches thick that starts with 50 Cent and ends with Ja Rule. In between come photographs, arrest records and other information on all the other major rappers in the US, from P Diddy to DMX. The police photograph them arriving at Miami airport, stake out hotels and video shoots and scrutinise their lyrics and connections in search of hints of potential violent conflict.
It is the latest development in a nationwide effort to place every aspect of hip-hop culture under state surveillance.

Miami officials say the binder was given to them by the New York police department during a three-day "hip-hop training session" in May that was also attended by officers from Atlanta and Los Angeles.

"Everyone that went got a binder with information on rappers that have been arrested, outlining charges," says Miami police sergeant Rafael Tapanes.

"They were trained what to look for in the lyrics, what to look for when they go to hip-hop concerts, what radio stations and TV stations to monitor to keep abreast of any rift between these rappers."

Miami police say they are just doing their job, monitoring a section of the music industry that has lost some of its most prominent talent, including Tupac Shakur, the Notorious BIG and Jam Master Jay, to violence.

"We have to keep an eye on these rivalries," the Miami Beach assistant police chief, Charles Press, told the Miami Herald. "What would law enforcement be if we closed our eyes? Our job is to know as much about things that could hurt innocent people."

Racial stereotyping
But rappers and civil rights advocates say it is an unnecessary intrusion on their civil liberties that smacks of racial profiling. "This kind of conduct shows insensitivity to constitutional limitations," says Bruce Rogow, a lawyer who represented 2 Live Crew in their successful defence against obscenity charges in the early 1990s. "It also implicates racial stereotyping."

The rap world has all the terminology of a modern state, it was only a matter of time before it got a dedicated police unit.

What has become known as the hip-hop "nation" is governed by a hip-hop "generation", where conflicts are resolved and agendas mapped out at hip-hop "summits", during which the hip-hop "community" decide how to protect and promote hip-hop "culture".

Rap is an adversarial genre in which artists do battle through their lyrics. In the past few years, there has been a concerted attempt to channel the creative energy - and billions of dollars - that have emerged into political activism, social responsibility and lobbying. This has been done most notably by rap impresario Russell Simmons through his Hip-Hop Summit Action Network.

Meanwhile, rappers have tried to improve their image. After running the marathon, P Diddy (who was acquitted of gun possession and bribing a witness in 2001 after a shoot-out in a New York nightclub) donated $2m (now £1.1m) to the children of New York city.

On her single Wake Up, Missy Elliott sings: "If you don't got a gun, it's all right/ If you're makin' legal money, it's all right."

The hip-hop label Murder Inc, which is under investigation by nearly a dozen law enforcement agencies for (among other things) its relationships with drug traffickers, has said it will drop the word "murder" from its title.

None the less, violence, all too often explicit in the lyrics, can spill out into real life with deadly consequences.

Last week, Chauncey Hawkins (otherwise known as Rapper Loon) was charged with assault with a deadly weapon after attacking a guard in Los Angeles.

Six months ago, Gerard Fields, 26, a rapper with what was Murder Inc, was shot dead. And, in recent times, there have been several attempts on the life of 50 Cent.

The intensity has abated since the east coast/west coast rivalry of the mid-1990s, which took the lives of two of rap's most promising stars: the Notorious BIG and Tupac Shakur.

Monitoring the 'crews'
But 18 months ago, Jam Master Jay, the DJ for Run-DMC, was shot in the head as he sat on a sofa in the lounge of a recording studio. Jay's murder sparked the NYPD to establish a special section within its gang intelligence unit. According to the New York Times, a team of six detectives monitor sales and keep track of the movements of different "crews" to make sure that rivals do not get in each other's way.

Miami police started collecting data after 250,000 hip-hop fans came to South Beach for a four-day party and there were 211 arrests, mostly for disorderly conduct and excessive drinking.

While no rap stars were arrested, the police felt their ignorance left them vulnerable. "Nobody on the beach had a handle on who the players were," said Mr Press.

"We didn't know anything, we didn't know who were the big record labels, who were the kingpins; we didn't know why there were rivalries with Ja Rule and Eminem."
 

janiecakes

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by mondo
Elsewhere in the interview, 50 recalls the first time he ever shot someone, discusses his own experiences with getting shot and says he wants to build a community center for children.

No gay kids allowed I presume.

Boooooooooooooooooooooooooo.
 

docta seuss

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Littlest Hobo
one does not look to rappers for progressive thinking.
you're incorrect. one does not look to pop[/]-rap for progressive thinking, but there are countless 'underground' rappers who shun the 'bling bling' attitude, while trying to raise awareness on the real issues facing their communites, and the world as a whole.

jeru and talib kweli are notable examples... they're a couple of the most well-known guys, but like i said, there's countless others.

as a general rule, it's the good music, movies, plays, art etc. that most people never even hear about.
 
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Bernnie Federko

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by kerouacdude
He also said, "Immigrants - they make no sense to me." :p

Immigrant's, or Immigration? If it's the latter, I would say the same thing if I was living in the states. The last thing they need is more people.
 

wayne kenoff

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Bernnie Federko
Immigrant's, or Immigration? If it's the latter, I would say the same thing if I was living in the states. The last thing they need is more people.

It's from a Guns'n'Roses song. Nice nic dude. I used to have your hockey card.
 
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2canplay

TRIBE Member
"I ain't into Hockey," 50 says in an interview in the April issue of Playboy, which hits stands Friday. "I don't like Hockey people around me, because I'm not comfortable with what their thoughts are. I'm not prejudiced. I just don't go with Hockey people and kick it — we don't have that much in common. I'd rather hang out with a straight dude."

:D
 

Bernnie Federko

TRIBE Member
I say 50 cent doesn't want to change right now, you can't make him. It may be wrong, or un-PC, for him to have opinions like he does, but hey, isn't free speech great?

* Cue classic Eminem style PR circus, making all them another million dollars and a ton of publicity. (repeat ad nauseum)
 

mondo

TRIBE Promoter
Originally posted by JayIsBored
how is this political?



...with all the hype surrounding same sex marriages and the government's involvement with that issue-


...I personally hope that ALL gangsta rap dies.
 
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