• Hi Guest: Welcome to TRIBE, Toronto's largest and longest running online community. If you'd like to post here, or reply to existing posts on TRIBE, you first have to register on the forum. You can register with your facebook ID or with an email address. Join us!

How-To Guide: Growing Techno in Toronto

JeremyK

TRIBE Promoter
Hello all!

I wanted to start a thread on a more postive note. The techno I know is fun, supportive and community based. Lets keep it that way!

So, what positive steps can we take to grow the Techno community in Toronto?

I want to hear some constructive answers.. We don't get help from the city, from the nightclubs, from most other genre's.. we don't have raves anymore where young kids get exposed to techno music in a life changing manner.. maybe there's an opportinity for something to change? maybe there's better opportunities available to us now?

How can we bring new open-minds into our community in a heathly sustainable fashion?

I'm all ears.. and I'm ready to rockno.. :cool:
 

vveerrgg

TRIBE Promoter
OhNo! said:
stop booking the same techno djs.
but what other dj's are going to bring a crowd?

thats what I wanna know. dj's gotta build their audience again... the audiences from the 90's are getting old.
 

musork

TRIBE Member
the plan is simple expand and stop play to the same crowds...
create alliences out side of techno circles polmo popo is the perfect example of doing this, I have made a huge effort also since day one to not only play exclusively for techno events...I mean if you limit your self to techno only events our shooting your self in the foot ultimatly as your limiting your self period...
you cant expect to draw in new blood to the events your at home with (ie techno events) if you your self dont reach out and expand your self first... its you that has to explore the foreign scenes and draw new fans in. the way your all suggesting is not going to work simply becasue your explecting far to much of people... your average person is to afraid to step out of what is known to them and in to a new situation its much easier for you as the artist to break new ground and expose these new scenes to what your doing and then eventually they will start following you where ever you play... that is how you build a fan base and then the rest follows suit, new fans forthe artists means new blood to his or her scene... it just takes one artists to give a taste of the techno drug to a new listener then they are hooked and want to know all about it...
 

Skipper

TRIBE Member
OhNo! said:
stop booking the same techno djs.
Personally I think there's a good range of techno DJs in this city - maybe because I'm not looking to go out and hear a new one every week. but between what you're doing, the transmit nights, the ADD folks, the odd Neon party and the big names that get booked here and there at guv/TIL, I feel pretty satisfied with my options.

The problem is that the people in this scene who consistently listen to techno are generally older, have more commitments, are picky as fuck and can't afford to go out and party every weekend. The sad reality is that to build a regular night you need to include people who are young, have the money and the desire to go out every weekend and aren't going to nitpick about the pocket protectors at the drake or that they couldn't get guest list when cover was 10 bucks. and generally, those people probably don't listen to techno regularly - they are just looking for the "it" thing to do.

The techno scene has to stop relying on the die hard techno lovers to keep this scene going. We're gettin old!
 

vveerrgg

TRIBE Promoter
true true....

like i said... banquet halls and all ages techno events. Promote it well, bring in some sick sound and make the place rattle the fillings out of yer teeth! A good mix of new school and old school is where it's at!
 

Skipper

TRIBE Member
I don't think people want that kind of party anymore...I think the only way for the techno scene to grow is for it to become more "mainstream" (and I dont' mean tiesto mainstream but I can't think of a better word) - however, it's a catch-22, because I get the impression that the people who have been in the scene the longest are the ones who want their music to stay "underground" and "true" and they don't want ignorant early 20-something pricks ruining their night with obnoxious drunken antics and general ignorance about techno.

Unfortunately, I think the 20 something pricks who don't know FA about techno are going to be necessary if techno is going to gain more momentum in this city (or any city!)
 

vveerrgg

TRIBE Promoter
same diff...... anyone from 18 - 20 year olds whos got nothing else to do but go to parties.... they'll be in it for life! and those are the ones worth entertianing
 

oddmyth

TRIBE Member
Means to an end : A short diatribe on why techno isn't going anywhere fast in North America.

1. Divergent Media Multiplying.

As the internet expands into a multimedia paradise, music listeners are faced with an ever expanding array of things to listen to. Techno which is what some of us solely listened to in the late 90's is becoming harder to spot in this ever expanding array of aural tasties. Moreover cross genre hybridization has allowed the pop world to become more intrinsically entwined into the electronic universe. Almost enough to make it seem like "pure" techno is non existent to the mass populace. Since popular DJ's follow the times, the "pure" techno records are also being phased out in favour of sounds that will draw crowds.

2. No rebirth .. little growth.

The crowds that flocked in the mid to latel 90's are now nearing or have surpassed the age of 30. Many have careers, children etc. and have moved on from the techno scene as a whole. Staltwart soldiers of techno who attended every event in the past are now casual observers. There are of course exceptions to the rule, but I would say for the majority (myself included) this rings true. As such there must be new blood to suckle at the teet of techno. This is a hard fought battle as many of us discovered techno on the verge of raving or in the early days of it. There are no longer raves, only clubs. Clubs mean 19+, clubs mean drinking and clubs mean 3am cutoff. All things we didn't have to endure previously. There is no taboo related to a club, there is little sense of adventure and the venues are not creative but are driven more towards drinking and making money for the bar rather than creating a night to be remembered. Consumerism and the ability to draw steady money from techno have in fact taken away one of the most unique parts of techno culture. We have very few new recruits in North America -- even after this recent OMG-minimal-roolz period. RE: Skippers point regarding techno hitting the mainstream. It already has .. just like it did in the late 80's early 90's with "dance" music, it has done so again with all the rock-electro-techno-disco crossover bands. "Pure" techno will be hard fought against this type of music to draw much of a crowd. It would be better off to assimilate techno into this, than to remain elitist and snub it. This assimilation is occuring and anyone who can play to this new crowd knows they can throw a "pure" techno tune or so in, but for the new crowd the rest of it has to be somewhat familiar to them for them to remain on the dancefloor. This is exactly how techno was brought to me .. alongside bands like Ministry, Front 242, FLA, Skinny Puppy etc. etc.

3. The same.

You will hear this all the time .. the same djs, the same venues, the same people going out .. the same, the same, the same. This market is very fickle both in terms of attendance, who the headliner is, what the venue is etc. etc.. There are far too many variables and far too many restrictions to make money on techno these days for most small time promoters to think about making a dime off of bringing in new blood. Those small promoters who continue to do it, do so for the love of it. You will find its been the same people throwing parties in toronto for the last 5 years.

I have no idea how to solve these problems .. nor do I want to. I would rather see techno slip off the edge of the earth again to be reborn 10 years later with far less inherent trash being produced.
 

ravinjunkie

TRIBE Member
ian said:
^^^^^ Directed mostly at Bigfat
Harvest had the same type of line-up as it has had for years and years (including very similar artists, many of whom are Harvest regulars). If you didn't like the music in the techno room, it's probably because the DJs were playing this year's music while you must be stuck in the past.

Note: to all techno dj's.

stop playing "this year's trend in techno" cause it fucking sucks.
 

Rude1_247

TRIBE Member
Todd, I'm curious as to why the issues you mentioned haven't affected the "house" scene in a similar matter?

Moreover, I wonder if/how gender plays a role as, to me anyways, it seems as though most techno fans in Toronto seem to be male, whereas within the "house" community the gender balance is equal.

That gender pattern also extends its way into the scene's infrastructure, meaning that a fair number of the local promoters for house in Toronto are female. I realize that the kick girls have done a lot for Techno in this city, but I'm not really familiar with too many females involved in the scene otherwise (and I realize this could be in large part due to my relative ignorance of the techno scene as a whole).

Is there a connection between gender trends and the success of a music scene?
 

Skipper

TRIBE Member
Rude1_247 said:
Is there a connection between gender trends and the success of a music scene?
To some extent obviously, because if women don't want to come to your party because it's a guaranteed sausage fest, then you're missing out on half of the target market.

I genuinely think house music is just more accessible; it's more friendly to the untrained ear and is easier for a new listener to get into, which gives it a much wider audience, at least in this city. My impression is that there are many women out there who frequent clubs/parties with house music that would just find it strange to spend a night listening to music without any words.
 

musork

TRIBE Member
the plan is simple expand and stop play to the same crowds...
create alliences out side of techno circles polmo popo is the perfect example of doing this, I have made a huge effort also since day one to not only play exclusively for techno events...I mean if you limit your self to techno only events our shooting your self in the foot ultimatly as your limiting your self period...
you cant expect to draw in new blood to the events your at home with (ie techno events) if you your self dont reach out and expand your self first... its you that has to explore the foreign scenes and draw new fans in. the way your all suggesting is not going to work simply becasue your explecting far to much of people... your average person is to afraid to step out of what is known to them and in to a new situation its much easier for you as the artist to break new ground and expose these new scenes to what your doing and then eventually they will start following you where ever you play... that is how you build a fan base and then the rest follows suit, new fans forthe artists means new blood to his or her scene... it just takes one artists to give a taste of the techno drug to a new listener then they are hooked and want to know all about it...
 
Top